NFP During Menapause


#1

My wife feels it is OK to use birth control since she is going through menapause since her cycles are all across the board. She figured since we had 5 kids she was opened to life. After 5 c-sections and being 46 a baby would danger her health. So she feels that during this transition condoms are acceptable because it is temporary. A Priest told her it was also OK. Not sure I agree with that. I get a different answer from every priest.


#2

There is only one answer to the question of contraception, and it is in black and white in the Catechism.

Contraception is intrinsically evil. It is **always **a grave sin against the sixth commandment.

Either your wife misunderstood, or you have a priest who needs to be reported to his bishop for such a statement and leading your wife astray.

If you wife is concerned, she should speak to her NFP instructor regarding specific charting for menopause. Her instructor can assist her. The Creighton Model has good instructions for this time of life.


#3

In addition to what 1ke said, she is not planning to use contraception - she is planning to make YOU use contraception (condom). There is no circumstance where a wife is justified in tempting her husband to commit sin.

edit - I just read some of your previous posts. There is a whole lot more going on than just menopause. It sounds like this is not the only thing going on with your wife's understanding of marriage. I hope you are able to find good, Catholic counseling.


#4

The Couple to Couple League also offers a class on NFP during Premenopause, as there are special considerations. It is definitely possible to chart and to read the fertility signs during this time. Check out www.ccli.org to find a teaching couple in your area and ask them about the Premenopause class.


#5

[quote="dgeier0725, post:1, topic:242471"]
My wife feels it is OK to use birth control since she is going through menapause since her cycles are all across the board. She figured since we had 5 kids she was opened to life. After 5 c-sections and being 46 a baby would danger her health. So she feels that during this transition condoms are acceptable because it is temporary. A Priest told her it was also OK. Not sure I agree with that. I get a different answer from every priest.

[/quote]

If you think her health is endangered you might wanna abstain from having sex with her until she is out on the other side of this.


#6

[quote="1ke, post:2, topic:242471"]

Contraception is intrinsically evil.

[/quote]

The USCCB disagrees with you and says that contraception is allowable in rare circumstances. Please do not preach error in this forum.


#7

Micah, you're going to have to provide some documentation of that claim. First I've ever heard of anything like that.


#8

Gladly! Don;t feel bad, lots of people are unaware of this. “Contraception is an intrinsic evil.” is a lie that is so often repeated by those who should know better that it is often mistaken for truth.

usccb.org/prolife/issues/abortion/ecfact.shtml

“Hospitals can offer rape victims treatments that are truly contraceptive and address their other needs with compassion and respect.”

This doesn’t address the OP’s concerns, it merely corrects the errant poster and seeks to stop the spread of misinformation.


#9

Ok, I see what you (and the USCCB) are saying. I believe 1ke is saying contraception in marriage is intrinsically evil. Her statement is accurate in that context (which is the context the original poster provided).

edit: Thanks for the link! Many times people make claims and refuse to provide any support.


#10

Right on. The word "intrinsic" is what sometimes trips people up, they often tend to use it as a synonym to "very", which it isn't. It might seem trivial, but I think it's important to be precise when speaking about what the Church does and does not teach.


#11

[quote="micahmike, post:8, topic:242471"]
Gladly! Don;t feel bad, lots of people are unaware of this. "Contraception is an intrinsic evil." is a lie that is so often repeated by those who should know better that it is often mistaken for truth.

usccb.org/prolife/issues/abortion/ecfact.shtml

"Hospitals can offer rape victims treatments that are truly contraceptive and address their other needs with compassion and respect."

This doesn't address the OP's concerns, it merely corrects the errant poster and seeks to stop the spread of misinformation.

[/quote]

*Conclusion
The law should not require hospitals to administer so-called "emergency contraception" when those drugs will end the life of a newly conceived human embryo. Hospitals can offer rape victims treatments that are truly contraceptive and address their other needs with compassion and respect.
*

I am not sure what the bishops mean by "truly contraceptive," but that was not a good word choice.


#12

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:11, topic:242471"]
*Conclusion
The law should not require hospitals to administer so-called "emergency contraception" when those drugs will end the life of a newly conceived human embryo. Hospitals can offer rape victims treatments that are truly contraceptive and address their other needs with compassion and respect.
*

I am not sure what the bishops mean by "truly contraceptive," but that was not a good word choice.

[/quote]

"Truly contraceptive" in this case means something that acts only to prevent conception. Other treatments, for example those that prevent implantaton, are not included as moral options in the case of the treatment of a victim of rape.

This directive is also very narrow. It applies only to the treatment of rape victims by medical personnel in hospitals. It can in no way be expanded to any kind of permission to use contraception by a married couple as is the case with the OP.


#13

[quote="Corki, post:12, topic:242471"]
"Truly contraceptive" in this case means something that acts only to prevent conception. Other treatments, for example those that prevent implantaton, are not included as moral options in the case of the treatment of a victim of rape.

This directive is also very narrow. It applies only to the treatment of rape victims by medical personnel in hospitals. It can in no way be expanded to any kind of permission to use contraception by a married couple as is the case with the OP.

[/quote]

Does this apply to Catholic hospitals too? I have to say, it makes me uncomfortable that even this statement is included - doesn't it say that it is sometimes justified to interfere with conception?


#14

The directive is specifically for Catholic hospitals. And yes, it provides justification for preventing ovulation or preventing fertilization as a compassionate option in the case of rape. In the case of rape, the USCCB’s committee made the case that the sperm would be the product of an unwanted agressor and that it would not be wrong to repel them. In the case of rape, the idea of the sex act being both unitive and procreative has already been broken since rape cannot be unitive.

All of the Church’s teaching about contraception is framed around it being a sin against marriage. Treatment of a rape victim is outside that context of marriage.


#15

I see now. Rape is not unitive, and if it is procreative, if the baby has already been conceived, then it cannot be aborted, but if it hasn’t been conceived, then preventing conception is not a sin? Am I getting it?


#16

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:15, topic:242471"]
I see now. Rape is not unitive, and if it is procreative, if the baby has already been conceived, then it cannot be aborted, but if it hasn't been conceived, then preventing conception is not a sin? Am I getting it?

[/quote]

Basically, that's it as long as you are a medical professional treating a rape victim.


#17

Can I ask you, who said your signature quote? Because that’s just how I view the Church today - too concerned with everything except abortion and its affects on society.


#18

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:17, topic:242471"]
Can I ask you, who said your signature quote? Because that's just how I view the Church today - too concerned with everything except abortion and its affects on society.

[/quote]

Blessed John Paul II :thumbsup: I ran out of characters to put the cite in.


#19

Thanks for all of the replies.


#20

Back to the question of the OP, are most women in this age group/circumstance using NFP? Is it irresponsible to stay open to life? I figure that if you are still fertile, God must have made you that way for a reason. So, I am not judging the circumstances of the OP - but is just being in that age group a good reason not to have a baby?


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