NFP question


#1

For last 4 months or so, I have been keeping track of my cycle as in when my friend comes every month. Lately I've been thinking about taking my temperature with the basal thermometer to get a more accurate idea. Are these two enough to reliably figure out when I am ovulating, or do I need to do the mucus as well?

Although I am not married, I am in a serious relationship and I think we might be headed toward marriage sometime in the near-ish future. I read that it is good to start tracking a while before marriage so I can have a good idea of when my fertile times are. Anyway, I was hoping some of you could give me advice because reading all the information on websites made NFP seem so complicated to me.

Thanks! :D


#2

Personally the mucus method was the easiest for me to understand and it's been pretty accurate so far. I can pinpoint the period of days when I conceived in November, for instance. And knew enough at the time to where I knew I was pregnant even before I missed my next period. NFP just makes you much more aware of, in tune with, your body.

So yeah, I would recommend adding the mucus method. I do mucus only and it's not complicated at all. :)


#3

I definately recommend to add the mucus. I do both, and I think both parts are essential. Actually, I think mucus is more important for avoiding or achieving pregnancy, but the added temperature allows you to see if you actually ovulated. I’ve had several anovulatory cycles, and I wouldn’t have known this without the temperature reading. In addition, there are temperature and mucus only guidelines that I use if the two don’t match up, but there is a shorter period of abstinence if the two do match up.

So, definately add the mucus - at least externally. That’s my opinion, of course.


#4

In order to know when you’re actually ovulating, you’ll have to look at the cervical mucous and/or cervical position signs.
The temperature sign is a helpful, but SECONDARY, sign… in that it only gives you information AFTER ovulation has already taken place. It’s a confirmation after the fact, not a real-time indicator of what’s going on.

Here is a great place to start with tracking your cycle… they have a free how-to booklet and free charts to print…
nfpandmore.com/

HTH!


#5

NFP International, www.NFPandmore.org, also has a Home Study Course for beginners using the online manual. Click at the top of the home page for information on this. Sheila Kippley, volunteer for NFP International


#6

Definitely do mucus, too, especially when you’re first learning NFP.

After several cycles (like 12) of accurately observing both, you may develop a preference for one sign over the other, and at that point, you may have the experience to rely more heavily on just the one. I went a period of time preferring my temps, but once I had my second baby (I’m on Baby #3 now), I prefer mucus. I’d rather rely on mucus now because my sleep patterns are erratic when nursing – especially when nursing a teething kiddo – and I’d rather not have the alarm clock go off and wake me if I just fell asleep for the thousandth time. :smiley:


#7

Readers should not think that getting up several times to take care of children will interfere with good temperature readings. All one needs is about an hour’s rest prior to the temperature-taking time. There are so many benefits to the temperature sign besides getting the husband involved.


#8

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.