NFP questions for Catholics

I hope people do not take this question wrong, but I am confused. I have read other posts especially in the family living portions of the forum where there have been “unplanned” pregnancies using NFP and the posters seem a little on the unhappy side.

Whats the problem? Using NFP is supposed to mean you are open to life… so why are so many upset when they get pregnant? Are they told that it is reliable?

I am a health care provider and the ONLY 100% method of avoiding pregnancy is abstinence. I actually find it almost annoying when I hear people using NFP and then complain that they weren’t ready for another baby. Sorry it’s just frustrating to hear.

My thinking is… if you don’t want to get pregnant… don’t have sex…period.

Of course all Christians should see children as a blessing from God. That doesn’t mean that a new pregnancy may not come as something of a shock. We should all catch ourselves, however, before we voice any anti-child sentiments.

Something to probably consider when reading some of the concerns is that you are reading first and early reactions.

It’s always a surprise, even when you are expecting it or know you work, to get the confirm.

All of our 7 pregnancies (6 through to birth) were unplanned in the sense that we didn’t sit down and chart out when to have kids. We did (and do) accept responsibility for our actions lovingly and have a great family.

After a while when you figure out you work, that early shock becomes understanding or expectation considering your actions.

Most would agree with you on how to not get pregnant, please inform your politicians that teaching this method (abstinance) is important.

It just doesn’t have any $$$ on the back end if taught and practiced. So public schools ignore it.

The only problem with abstinence is… well, no sex. :shrug:

I just remembered a great story.

My brother-in-law is much younger than the rest of his siblings.

One day when he was young, he asked his mom if he was an accident.

His mom answered “Oh John, you were all accidents.”

I was cracking up when I first heard that story.

Our NFP practitioner commented once that many of her clients are not Catholic, Christian, or anything, but what could be called ‘new-age’ people; that is, they like to do everything as naturally as possible. So, their motivation for using NFP is not to monitor fertility and try to plan out a family, but to prevent pregnancy without using artificial means. That is, they are not open to life, just planned ‘recreational sex.’ So, their reaction when conception occurs, could very well be shock and disappointment, similar to a couple who use artificial ‘birth control.’

The period is only part of the problem for those using NFP. :stuck_out_tongue:

But seriously, the Church recognizes that couples may need to plan their pregnancies for any number of reasons, and when things don’t go according to those plans, people may not handle the added stress well.

Of course, God has His plans, too.

[quote=Hockeygurl] I hope people do not take this question wrong, but I am confused. I have read other posts especially in the family living portions of the forum where there have been “unplanned” pregnancies using NFP and the posters seem a little on the unhappy side.

Whats the problem? Using NFP is supposed to mean you are open to life… so why are so many upset when they get pregnant? Are they told that it is reliable?

I am a health care provider and the ONLY 100% method of avoiding pregnancy is abstinence. I actually find it almost annoying when I hear people using NFP and then complain that they weren’t ready for another baby. Sorry it’s just frustrating to hear.

My thinking is… if you don’t want to get pregnant… don’t have sex…period.
[/quote]

Maybe they are using NFP with a contraceptive mentally which means they would of course be upset if it did not work.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.