Nightcrawler is Catholic (X Men 2)

Nightcrawler: You know, outside the circus, most people were afraid of me. But I didn't hate them. I pitied them. Do you know why? Because most people will never know anything beyond what they see with their own two eyes.
Storm: Well, I gave up on pity a long time ago.
Nightcrawler: Someone so beautiful should not be so angry.
Storm: Sometimes anger can help you survive.
Nightcrawler: So can faith.

"Most people will never know anything beyond what they see with their own two eyes."
That quote always haunted me, and made me think about religion though I am not sure weather he was talking about faith, or his mutant stuff... I just imagined it worked, for faith.

If I remember right, he also said he had a tattoo for every sin he had committed.

I don’t remember that line in the movie. I was at the theatre two days ago and noticed a floor ad for a new x-men movie subtitled first class. I’m not sure if night crawler is in that one, but crossing my fingers. Other catholic heros off the top of my head ghostrider, daredevil, and the punisher. First class is obviously a prequel here is imdb link

imdb.com/title/tt1270798/

Not just a Catholic, he was also a seminarian for a time and sort of a priest.

I say sort of a priest because while he believed himself one he was actually mind-wiped by a psychic mutant into believing he had been ordained as part of long crazy scheme to bring down the Catholic Church and forcefully bring about end-times, but hey thats comics for you. Hard to keep your stories from sounding ridiculous when any guy with a good head on his shoulders can build some sort of device to grant them super-powers.

[quote="PatrickSebast, post:4, topic:234271"]
Not just a Catholic, he was also a seminarian for a time and sort of a priest.

I say sort of a priest because while he believed himself one he was actually mind-wiped by a psychic mutant into believing he had been ordained as part of long crazy scheme to bring down the Catholic Church and forcefully bring about end-times, but hey thats comics for you. Hard to keep your stories from sounding ridiculous when any guy with a good head on his shoulders can build some sort of device to grant them super-powers.

[/quote]

Please do not reference Chuck Austen's absolutely awful story about that. It is so bad I still shudder thinking about it. Austen plainly hadn't got a clue about Catholic theology of even the most basic kind. Christ Claremont is the writer who first showed Nightcrawler as a devbout Catholic in the early 1980's and he had far more respect for people's faith and managed to make it a positive part of Kurt's personality and even used it as a key part of the close friendship between Wolverine and Nightcrawler that evolved over time.

Nightcrawler in the comics is somewhat different personality wise than the movie. He was usually portrayed as more of a swashbuckler type who was humorous and somewhat flirtatious but with a deep underlying faith and morality. One of the best instances is when the X-men are forced to fight Dracula (or the Marvel universe version of him) and Wolverine uses his claws to make the sign of the cross. Dracula laughs at him telling him that only works if you believe. At which point Nightcrawler tells Dracula he has lost, because 'he does believe' and makes the sign of the cross with fallen twigs as they are in Central Park in NYC, causing Dracula to recoil in noticeable pain.

By the way the Punisher was also a seminarian at one point, unless that has bee retconned out lately. There's also a more obscure Marvel hero Firebird who is very devoutly Catholic. But few writers can handle her without making her into a parody of herself.

I think X-Men was the most diverse of the Marvel Comic Books, there was a lot of religion in it from Magneto’s Judiasm, to

I read that Angel, Phoenix, Emma Frost, Marvel Girl and The Beast were Episcopalian.
Cyclops was Protestant.
Other Christians included Jubilee.
Rogue was Southern Baptist.
Yukio, Sunpyre and Sunfire were Shinto.

Other Catholics in X Men include Havoc, Siryn,
Gambit was also Catholic from what I read, with that very Southern Cajun Catholicism.

Storm was supposed to be a God herself!!! Or well, worshipped as a Goddess by tribesmen.

My hubby is a big comic books guy (specifically X-Men, and one of his favorites is Nightcrawler). Awhile back, I stumbled upon this website that you all might find interesting.
And no, I don't think Kurt Wagner will be in the First Class.

Oh yep I'm familiar with this website. A word of warning, some of the articles are purely speculative. For example where they try and argue is Bruce Wayne Catholic or Anglican. Although Superman is definitely Methodist though and has been shown on the page as such. :)

Nightcrawler is my favourite member of The X-Men and him being a devout Catholic adds to it so much!

[quote="JharekCarnelian, post:8, topic:234271"]
Oh yep I'm familiar with this website. A word of warning, some of the articles are purely speculative. For example where they try and argue is Bruce Wayne Catholic or Anglican. Although Superman is definitely Methodist though and has been shown on the page as such. :)

[/quote]

I'm so glad Nightcrawler is a devout Catholic:D. Even though I doubt writers would write about it, I REALLY wish that Nightcrawler is what you call a Marian Catholic like Saint Louis de Montfort and Saint Alphonsus. It'd be the most awesome thing ever.

Also, Daredevil is Catholic, an so is helloboy. In fact, he's the only traditionalist Catholic superhero I know. I heared that the Church accepted him for what he is publicly (in the comics not in real life you idiot!) and I'm glad that there are non-catholics and not so devout ones who do show our church in a positive light.

I'm so glad Nightcrawler is a devout Catholic. Even though I doubt writers would write about it, I REALLY wish that Nightcrawler is what you call a Marian Catholic like Saint Louis de Montfort and Saint Alphonsus. It'd be the most awesome thing ever.

When Professor X locates Nightcrawler in the Cerebro machine, he's praying the Rosary and is in the middle of the Our Father, which he also prays later on in the climax of the film.

[quote="Blood_Angel, post:1, topic:234271"]

"Most people will never know anything beyond what they see with their own two eyes."
That quote always haunted me, and made me think about religion though I am not sure weather he was talking about faith, or his mutant stuff... I just imagined it worked, for faith.

[/quote]

See my above post, he's talking about faith....

Nightcrawler: You know, outside the circus, most people were afraid of me. But I didn't hate them. I pitied them. Do you know why? Because most people will never know anything beyond what they see with their own two eyes.
Storm: Well, I gave up on pity a long time ago.
Nightcrawler: Someone so beautiful should not be so angry.
Storm: Sometimes anger can help you survive.
Nightcrawler: So can faith

This is one of the reasons I never was too attached to the X-men comics/shows.

It seemed the mutants most capable of hiding within society were the most angry with it.

Look at Storm: "Oh woe is me! I have the ability to control the weather, and look like an attractive woman."

Then there is nightcrawler who can remain pious and saintly even when he can't hide the fact he is a mutant to the world.

[quote="Disinherited, post:10, topic:234271"]
I'm so glad Nightcrawler is a devout Catholic:D. Even though I doubt writers would write about it, I REALLY wish that Nightcrawler is what you call a Marian Catholic like Saint Louis de Montfort and Saint Alphonsus. It'd be the most awesome thing ever.

Also, Daredevil is Catholic, an so is helloboy. In fact, he's the only traditionalist Catholic superhero I know. I heared that the Church accepted him for what he is publicly (in the comics not in real life you idiot!) and I'm glad that there are non-catholics and not so devout ones who do show our church in a positive light.

[/quote]

Most writers simply don't possess a working knowledge of Catholicism and in their hands Kurt becomes a sort of generic Christian. Although the better writers even when they did that showed his faith with respect. Claremont who introduced the whole idea knew enough to have him praying in Latin on panel at several points, although he didn't always develop his faith as distinctively as he migth. But in fairness the whole idea of an openly religious hero itself was fairly radical and new in mainstream superhero comics in the late 70's and early 80's. Witness this conversation between Wolverine and Nightcrawler whom Claremont established as best friends despite their very different outlooks at times:-

Logan: "What's doin', bub?"

Kurt: "What does it look like?"

Logan: "Incongruous. I guess I never figured you for the religious type."

Kurt: "Why, don't I look the part? I admit I'm rarely seen in a church - but I draw comfort from my beliefs and from prayer. Such comfort is dearly needed now - by us all. You should try it, Logan. Who knows, you might like it."

Logan: "I did, in the army. A mistake. I believe in nothin' - never have, never will. What matters is what I can see, hear, smell, taste, thouch - tangible things, physical things. Reality. The rest is imagination."

Nightcrawler: "And you have no use for that?"

Wolverine: "Nope."

Nightcrawler: "I am sorry, my friend. I never realized how utterly, inescapably alone you must be - with nothing to hold onto but yourself. More alone than I - despite my outre appearance - could ever be."

Wolverine: "I ain't alone, bub - I got you. C'mon, lessee if they got any brew on this bucket."

The sequence actually starts with Kurt praying in Latin and Logan overhearing them. Claremont made marvellous use at times of these two characters as foils for each other. With Kurt highlighting that Logan's cynicism wasn't quite as real as the latter believed it to be and that he too might be regarded as a man of faith in his own way. In return Logan's nature some times served to teach Kurt a lesson in confidence or self-discipline. But this was a different era where Kurt could argue with Logan on panel about the latter's use of lethal force and try and show him how morally it was not always acceptable.

Other Catholic heroes. I can think of lots of nominal ones but the only one who is openly devout I can call to mind is Firebird who is a Mexican Catholic hero in Marvel comics. She's rarely seen though and only Steve Englehart who created her and one or two other writers made good use of her faith.

I forgot Huntress. Probably DC's most Catholic hero. DC generally has tended to shy away till recent years from having it's heroes show particular faiths too openly. The Huntress is a character who originally started out as the daughter of Batman and Catwoman from a parallel Earth and who had no particular faith identified on panel. However this version of the character was wiped out in a reboot and she was reinvented as the child of Sicilian mafioso who sees her family wiped out as a child. Her faith plays an immense part in many stories she appears in, although she struggles greatly with it at times it is obviously of huge importance to her. Notably the man who trained her as a young woman in martial arts and the use of weapons was a relative who was a hitman for the mafioso. He later repents bitterly of his ways and becomes a priest and is constantly seeking to have Huntress use less vicious methods in her activities as a hero and to perhaps abandon what he sees as an empty quest for vengeance. She is often shown to regard Batman as a father figure of a sort although it's an uneasy relationship at times.

I think Thor is a Neo-Pagan.

Thor is an Asgardian, he is portrayed (along with his people) as part of one of the many pantheons of gods in the Marvel Universe. I belived the incarnation of Thor in one iteration si closer to been a pagan, although I believe it’s been established now that even he is a god.

Mentioning Huntress if we have any comics fans reading besides the obvious few contributing this story is probably one fo the best she ever appeared in:-

Especially noteable for the climax which was interesting and unexpected for a comic. The character on her right is The Question who is an extremely lapsed Catholic who ironically enough in this series is actually more in tune morally with Church teaching than the Huntress.

adherents.com/lit/comics/comic_book_religion.html
This site has quite a comprehensive list. Characters like Cutey Honey, Punisher, Venom, the Magdalena, Daredevil and Zorro I already knew were Catholic, but I'm surprised by many other characters listed as Catholic, such as Catwoman, Lois Lane, Betty Ross, Ghost Rider, the Darkness, Powdered Toast Man(!), and Lizard.

That site is an interesting read. But with regards to some character it does speculate some what. Lois Lane is a case in point, if you read the article on her faith it shows she might be Catholic but there's no absolute proof for it as her faith has never been offficially stated on panel over the years. Contrary to her husband Clark Kent who has been shown to be definitely a Methodist and at points has been shown addressing his pastor for spiritual guidance.

I forgot Catwoman. She is most definitely Catholic, although that's something that was only introduced to the character's back story in the last twenty or so years. She is seriously lapsed though and has been shown to be conflicted in her feelings about faith generally. Her sister was a nun at one point however, until she left her order to marry and was rendered catatonic by a truly gruesome attack on her by one of Batman's nastier villians in which he forced her to eat parts of her still living husband as he tortured him. Catwoman was established as been of Hispanic heritage some years back I remember and coming from an extremely abusive family. Her late mother was shown as been a fairly devout Catholic whilst her father was a brutal and particuraly nasty man.

The Earth Two version of Catwoman was shown marrying Bruce Wayne in a Catholic Church in the 1970's. I will see if I can a scan of this. The Earth Two Batman and indeed the silver age and bronze age Batman were often shown as far less cynical than the modern take. As oppossed to the modern version who has often been shown as cynical (or at least he likes to say he is) about religion in general.

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