Nightly prayers in latin

I tried doing a websearch (Of Course using prolifesearch.com), however I couldn’t find the results I was looking for. So does anyone know any evening prayers in latin (those that you say before falling asleep)? If possible I’d like one that has the “god bless X, Y, Z” in it.

Thanks,

Catholig

How about reciting the Compline?breviary.net/ordinary/ordineastoctcomp.htm
Or saying Psalm 129breviary.net/comment/commentps/commentps129.htm

Just to let you know this site is sedevacantist, but there is no fault with their prayers etc.

God Bless,
Kieran

Benedice, domine, X, Y, Zque.

However I am not sure whether using the imperative to God is idiomatic.

Incidently, try doing Latin prayers with your kids. My 4 year old LOVES Wednesday because that’s Latin Prayer day. We even say grace in Latin. He’s memorized grace before meals, the Pater Noster, Ave Maria, Gloria Patri, and others. It’s a neat change.

Benedic, Domine nos, et haec tua dona, quae de tua largitate sumus sumpturi, per Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Bless us O Lord and these thy gifts…

You can write something of your own. But why in Latin? I know the language, I like praying in it, but whenever I feel like talking to God in Latin rather than my language, I’m getting a nudging feeling it’s superfluous because He understands any language and my use of Latin doesn’t give Him any glory. :slight_smile:

If you feel bad about the imperative (grammatically, whatever you add “please” or “I beg you” after, is also imperative), you can use the conjunctive. But even the Our Father is full of imperatives. :wink:

But why in Latin? I know the language, I like praying in it, but whenever I feel like talking to God in Latin rather than my language, I’m getting a nudging feeling it’s superfluous because He understands any language and my use of Latin doesn’t give Him any glory.

Latin is fine.

But that’s true; Latin was traditionally the language of public prayer, while private prayer was usually said in the vernacular.

That is SO cool!

Also known as the jussive subjunctive.
Deus benedicat X, Y, Zque
"May God bless…"

Otherwise, I myself prefer the *Nunc Dimittis *and its antiphon, from the post-conciliar compline:

*Ant. Salva nos, Domine, vigilantes, custodi nos dormientes, ut vigilemus cum Christo et requiescamus in pace.

(Lc ii, 29-32)
Nunc dimittis servum tuum, Domine, secundum verbum tuum in pace,
quia viderunt oculi mei salutare tuum,
quod parasti ante faciem omnium populorum,
lumen ad revelationem gentium et gloriam plebis tuae Israel.*

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake, watch over us as we sleep, that awake we may keep watch with Christ and asleep rest in his peace.

(Lk 2:29-32)
Lord, now, you let your servant go in peace,
your word has been fulfilled,
for my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people,
a light to reveal you to the nations,
and the glory of your people, Israel.

tee

The pre-concilar is the same. :slight_smile:

That’s more like it. My Latin ended at GCSE.

So it is. :slight_smile:

I did not see the *Salva nos *antiphon at the URL above, but also had failed to note that the above is specific to the Easter Octave, which replaced that antiphon by *<ahem> Haec dies quam fecit *(and which takes a different position in the post-conciliar Easter Octave Compline).

:tiphat:
tee

Angele Dei qui custos es mei, me tibi comissum pietate superna, haec nocte illumina, custodi, rege et guberna.

Angel of God.

It is so encouraging to read about another family teaching their children Latin. After reading the documents of Vatican II, I determined that I had an obligation to teach my children the Catholic prayers in Latin so we have Latin school on Saturdays (the same day several of my kids friends go to Greek school or Hebrew school).

Latin School? Is it run by some agency?

Catholig

Angele Dei, also known as the Prayer to One’s Guardian Angel, was in the past attributed to St. Anselm (c1033-1109), for it appears in medieval collections of St. Anselm’s works. However, it is clear that this prayer was added to Anselm’s works sometime after his death.
As best can be determined, this prayer is an 11th/12th century interpolation of a prayer composed by Reginald of Canterbury, who died sometime after 1109. This prayer is from Reginald’s Life of St. Malchus (d. c 390), a famous hermit who was a friend of St. Jerome (c 341-420). The popular English translation given below is from the later half of the 19th century and appears in the Baltimore Manual of Prayers (1888).
Guardian Angels protect their charges against the assaults of demons to preserve them from sin. Several passages in Scripture mention them in passing. (Dn 10: 13,20-21, Tob 12:12, Mt 18:10, Acts 12:11,15). October 2 is the memorial to the Guardian Angels. This prayer carries a partial indulgence.
ANGELE DEI,
qui custos es mei,
Me tibi commissum pietate superna;
(Hodie, Hac nocte) illumina, custodi, rege, et guberna.
Amen.
Then:
Benedìcat Deus + names of the persons to be blessed.

ANGEL OF GOD,
my guardian dear,
To whom his love commits me here;
Ever this (day, night) be at my side,
To light and guard, to rule and guide.
Amen.

Then :
God Bless + names of the persons to be blessed.

Note that the English is easy for young ones as it has a rhyme in it.

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