Nimrod


#1

I'm going through Genesis right now and I found these passages interesting (quotes are from the RSV: Catholic Edition; apparently I'm not allowed to put quotes from the Jerusalem Bible online due to copyright issues, so another translation will have to do:)):

"8 Cush became the father of Nimrod; he was the first on earth to be a mighty man. 9 He was a mighty hunter before the Lord; therefore it is said, “Like Nimrod a mighty hunter before the Lord.” 10 The beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Erech, and Accad, all of them in the land of Shinar." -Genesis 10:8-10

From: www.biblegateway.com (unless anyone needs the website)

I've heard of the name "Nimrod" before. The reference notes in the JB state that Nimrod may be from a popular story regarding a Mesopotamian mythical hero. Does anyone have any more information on this "Nimrod" individual?


#2

[quote="Tous_Logous, post:1, topic:315310"]

I've heard of the name "Nimrod" before. The reference notes in the JB state that Nimrod may be from a popular story regarding a Mesopotamian mythical hero. Does anyone have any more information on this "Nimrod" individual?

[/quote]

There's too much information on him....
He was a popular figure and copyists throughout history have "borrowed" his name for various fanciful insertions into their own stories.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimrod

His actual name, used in scripture, appears to be a distortion for polemical/mockery reasons. He is considered quite evil in the scriptural context.

Nimrod, scriptural-ly, would be son of Ham (cham); and the appellation "hunter in the face of the Lord", indicates that he used his talent(s) in opposition to God.

Considering his ties to Ham (the son who attempted to use Noah's nakeness...) traditional founder of Egypt, and also to Babel (loosely linked to much later Babylon), the negative meaning of his name isn't surprising.

In the wikipedia article, is beging to tie his name to that of deities in the meopotamian area; and that makes sense -- because kings and rulers were called "gods" even in Hebrew usage ( Moses was also called that.... ) to refer to their position as executors of God's governing power through history;

Of course, Nimrod's character would be opposed to the usage of "gods" in any diminished sense.... :)


#3

In my life I have heard the name used perjoratively, as in, “What a Nimrod!” as in, “What a big oaf!”


#4

[quote="Huiou_Theou, post:2, topic:315310"]
There's too much information on him....
He was a popular figure and copyists throughout history have "borrowed" his name for various fanciful insertions into their own stories.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nimrod

His actual name, used in scripture, appears to be a distortion for polemical/mockery reasons. He is considered quite evil in the scriptural context.

Nimrod, scriptural-ly, would be son of Ham (cham); and the appellation "hunter in the face of the Lord", indicates that he used his talent(s) in opposition to God.

Considering his ties to Ham (the son who attempted to use Noah's nakeness...) traditional founder of Egypt, and also to Babel (loosely linked to much later Babylon), the negative meaning of his name isn't surprising.

In the wikipedia article, is beging to tie his name to that of deities in the meopotamian area; and that makes sense -- because kings and rulers were called "gods" even in Hebrew usage ( Moses was also called that.... ) to refer to their position as executors of God's governing power through history;

Of course, Nimrod's character would be opposed to the usage of "gods" in any diminished sense.... :)

[/quote]

Thanks for the info. I found it quite interesting.

I did some more research. With my Haydock commentary on e-sword, Nimrod is not characterized as a "hunter of beasts" but of man instead. Nimrod appears to be a corrupt, tyrannical, and violent man. Even Josephus talks about Nimrod as being a violent man and one who caused men to rebel against God, suggesting that all happiness must come from man, not from God. He is described as an idolater and early heretic.

Again, quite interesting. I actually picked up "The Works of Josephus" yesterday so perhaps there is more information about Nimrod that Josephus talks about in his works. I suppose this is more of a motivation to actually read Josephus' literature.:)


#5

[quote="svid2, post:3, topic:315310"]
In my life I have heard the name used perjoratively, as in, "What a Nimrod!" as in, "What a big oaf!"

[/quote]

That's because of Bugs Bunny! He would sarcastically call Elmer Fudd "Nimrod" because Nimrod was a great hunter. But people just thought it was a general insult like "dork" or "idiot." :)


#6

[quote="pollynova, post:5, topic:315310"]
That's because of Bugs Bunny! He would sarcastically call Elmer Fudd "Nimrod" because Nimrod was a great hunter. But people just thought it was a general insult like "dork" or "idiot." :)

[/quote]

I just KNEW I had heard that somewhere before.... NOW I know where it was!
:D


#7

[quote="pollynova, post:5, topic:315310"]
That's because of Bugs Bunny! He would sarcastically call Elmer Fudd "Nimrod" because Nimrod was a great hunter. But people just thought it was a general insult like "dork" or "idiot." :)

[/quote]

Epic! :whackadoo:


#8

[quote="Tous_Logous, post:1, topic:315310"]
I'm going through Genesis right now and I found these passages interesting (quotes are from the RSV: Catholic Edition; apparently I'm not allowed to put quotes from the Jerusalem Bible online due to copyright issues, so another translation will have to do:)):

"8 Cush became the father of Nimrod; he was the first on earth to be a mighty man. 9 He was a mighty hunter before the Lord; therefore it is said, “Like Nimrod a mighty hunter before the Lord.” 10 The beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Erech, and Accad, all of them in the land of Shinar." -Genesis 10:8-10

From: www.biblegateway.com (unless anyone needs the website)

I've heard of the name "Nimrod" before. The reference notes in the JB state that Nimrod may be from a popular story regarding a Mesopotamian mythical hero. Does anyone have any more information on this "Nimrod" individual?

[/quote]

Why do you think you are not allowed to quote from the Jerusalem Bible. You can quote anything from any book/papers. You simply have to mention where the quote is from.


closed #9

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