NJ Teacher Told Student To Put Bible Away

OLD BRIDGE, N.J. (AP) ― Her parents say a New Jersey elementary school teacher told a third-grader the Bible was inappropriate reading material for quiet time.

Michelle Jordat tells MyFoxNY.com her daughter, Mariah, cried when the teacher told her to put the Bible away.

The principal at Madison Park Elementary School in Old Bridge apologized and said the teacher made a mistake. The principal says school policy allows children to read the Bible or any other religious book during quiet time.

The school board addressed the issue for concerned parents on Tuesday night.

cbs3.com/wireapnewsnj/NJ.principal.apologizes.2.1372795.html

There are a lot of teachers that just don’t know what the law is about Bibles on a school campus.

Hopefully this is the case and the teacher is not anti-Christian.

Good for the principal and the School Board.

Peace
James

That’s why an appeal process is a good thing.

Some teachers have been influenced into believing that it is their duty to squelch religious expression of any kind. The NEA and it’s sister org NJEA are, in part, to blame for this.

I am glad the board moved quickly to admit the mistake. Of couse, the teacher won’t likely be administratively be corrected or disciplined but that’s life in a union education system. :shrug:

[quote="Corki, post:4, topic:179927"]
That's why an appeal process is a good thing.

Some teachers have been influenced into believing that it is their duty to squelch religious expression of any kind. The NEA and it's sister org NJEA are, in part, to blame for this.

I am glad the board moved quickly to admit the mistake. Of couse, the teacher won't likely be administratively be corrected or disciplined but that's life in a union education system. :shrug:

[/quote]

I don't know that the teacher should be disciplined so long as it is a simple mistake that has been corrected. As you say some teachers may simply have the wrong Idea about what is and is not allowed. The principal has obviously corrected the teacher and clarified the policy for her. This should be enough. To do more would simply blow the incident out of proportion.

Peace
James

I got sent to the office once during a study hall in junior high school for reading The Caine Mutiny by Herman Wouk.

Of course, the chapter heading was entitled "The Best God****d Target-Towing Ship", and I think that was what caught the monitor's eye. She could, of course, have asked me what the book was about, but she didn't---all she focused on was the *(gasp!) naughty word.

The vice-principal questioned me about the book, and I told him it belonged to my parents; he asked me if they knew I was reading it, and I replied that they did, and he let the matter drop.

Last period I told my English teacher about it, and he just rolled his eyes and said, "That's the way sailors talk. Evidently (and here he named the staff members involved), never having served, don't know that."

I had a girl in my class who carried a huge Douay-Rheims Bible with her everyhwere she went, and was constantly reading it. Nobody ever said boo to her about it. A few days after graduation, she entered a convent.

I disagree. It was not just a “simple mistake”. This was a wrongful act by a teacher that caused a third grader to burst into tears. The “rights” issue is what makes it worse but the fact is that an elementary teacher was so ignorant of the rules that she caused emotional distress to one of her students. An employee of any organization should be aware of the policies and procedures and expected to follow them.

Imagine, in the “real world” if an employee did that to a customer. Simple mistake or not, you can bet the employee would get, at the very least, a warning put in his/her file. Teachers, especially union ones, are not held to the same employee standards that most of us are.

I guess I am not clear on what the difference is between a “simple mistake” and a “wrongful act” actually is. Forgive my ignorance.
I will grant that it is sad that what the teacher did caused the child distress but children can have strong reactions to things that we as adults should be able to see in a more proper light.

The “rights” issue is what makes it worse but the fact is that an elementary teacher was so ignorant of the rules that she caused emotional distress to one of her students. An employee of any organization should be aware of the policies and procedures and expected to follow them.

Perhaps she was aware of the policies and procedures. Perhaps the policies were not clear enough and she simply misinterpreted them. There is not sufficient information for us to know.

Imagine, in the “real world” if an employee did that to a customer. Simple mistake or not, you can bet the employee would get, at the very least, a warning put in his/her file. Teachers, especially union ones, are not held to the same employee standards that most of us are.

I’m having trouble trying to think of a situation in the real world where an employee would tell a customer they could not read a particular book. :slight_smile:

As for having “a warning put in his/her file”, I should say that since the teacher has been corrected, the Principal and the school board apologized for the incident has been sufficiently covered.

Of course that is just my opinion.

Peace
James

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