No Creed said at Sunday Mass (9/14/14)


#1

Does anyone know of a reason why there was no creed said at the Mass I went to on Sunday?

It was the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, but otherwise a normal OF Mass, no RCIA stuff, etc.


#2

No idea. If there was nothing special going on (sacraments, special ceremonies etc.) then we would have no way of knowing why there was no creed at YOUR Sunday Mass.


#3

Did you consider asking the priest?


#4

Yep, nothing special at all going on. Other than the aforementioned feast, which to my understanding wouldn’t be related to leaving out the recitation of a creed.


#5

Not at the time, but now I’d have to track him down. He was a visiting priest from a different part of the state. Unless the pastor would know for some reason? I don’t know if they run these things by each other or not. :confused:


#6

Hmmm… No idea.

There was a retired/visiting priest at the Mass I attended yesterday as well. He talked about the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. Having attended Protestant services all my life, this was the first time I’d heard about it. We did recite the Creed, though.


#7

At my parish, it’s quite common. Either it’s because of baptisms or something else that fills in the time after the sermon. Even the Prayers of the Faithful are sometimes trimmed or skipped. But then this is a Spanish-Anglo community, and I attend more Spanish Masses than English.


#8

I’m seriously beginning to wonder if some visiting priests have made a habit of NOT initiating parts of the Mass that can sometimes be omitted or for which there are options.

In the case of the creed, it can be omitted when some alternate profession of faith or commitment will take place. And there are also options as to which creed will be used.
While the priest is *officially *in control of options at a given Mass, in many parishes such things are *actually *determined by some liturgical committee. Many priests, resident or visiting are happy to delegate such decisions.

It wouldn’t surprise me that visiting priests are sometimes given grief for choosing the “wrong” option. So if no one at the parish (for example, a deacon) initiates a questionable part, then the visiting priest just skips it.


#9

I see. So perhaps it was a mutual confusion then. Maybe he was waiting for a queue, and so were we, and since no one did anything he just moved along?


#10

This has happened at my Church as well if there is a Baptism.


#11

It was said at my Mass at my church, so it’s not something universal. I’ve been to daily masses where it was omitted but not a Sunday.


#12

I don’t think “omitted” is the correct verb for this situation. The Nicene Creed is not normally prayed at daily Mass unless it is a special or solemn occasion.


#13

Maybe he just assumed everyone believed.


#14

Sometimes priests make mistakes and forget things.

I think one of the funniest but saddest things I heard was at the last Mass of a priest who was leaving one parish (his first parish after ordination) for another. He thanked various people including “all the people who DIDN’T call the pastor when I accidentally skipped the Creed at my first Mass in the parish.”

People watch like hawks and complain at the slightest opportunity. Sometimes priests make mistakes.


#15

That’s why we have missals.


#16

I’m merely speculating. It just seems like a lot of people post questions regarding visiting priests.

(Of course people also ask similar questions about their own parishes so maybe there’s nothing special about visiting priests.)


#17

The Creed is not recited at Masses in which there are Baptisms, not because of time issues, but because during the Baptismal Rite the Baptismal vows (in which the essentials of the Creed are stated) are to be assented to by everyone in the congregation, not just the Godparents. Renewing one’s Baptismal vows during Mass replaces the Creed.


#18

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