No Imprimatur for Catholic Textbook


#1

Currently, I’m taking a RCIA class to obtain my chatechist certificate. This class is also being taken by adult Catholics who have never been confirmed, but baptized.

This class is being taught by the chancellor of the diocese so I thought that this class would be taught by someone who knows what they’re talking about.

Things began getting a little wierd a few weeks ago when the teacher said that Jesus did come to Earth to find a church. The next week she let it be known that if girls want to be priests than she couldn’t see a reason why they couldn’t. She refers to God as “She”, justifying it by saying God posses both male and female qualities and there’s nothing wrong with refering to God as “She.”

This started making me suspicious of the text book, “Catholicism in the third millennium” by Thomas Rausch. Nothing in the assigned reading so far has raised any eyebrows but I started reading other chapters and found the following:
"Jesus did not come to Earth to find a church"
He also questions why homosexuals cannot have committed relationships.

I looked to the front of the book for an imprimatur, and of course could not find one. This lead me to the introduction where he says, “Perhaps the best book on Catholocism is Richard McBrien’s volume by the same name.”

The name Richard McBrien set something off in my head and of course, there was a story on him in the July/August 2005 edition of “This Rock”

So now I’m wondering what to do. Do I speak directly to the Chancellor and explain my concerns with her teaching against Rome, do I go to my parish Priest? I don’t think I can write the Bishop because the Chancellor has said that she helps go through the letters to the Bishop!!

Any suggestions would be welcome!


#2

[quote=tikiboy]Currently, I’m taking a RCIA class to obtain my chatechist certificate. This class is also being taken by adult Catholics who have never been confirmed, but baptized.

This class is being taught by the chancellor of the diocese so I thought that this class would be taught by someone who knows what they’re talking about.

Things began getting a little wierd a few weeks ago when the teacher said that Jesus did come to Earth to find a church. The next week she let it be known that if girls want to be priests than she couldn’t see a reason why they couldn’t. She refers to God as “She”, justifying it by saying God posses both male and female qualities and there’s nothing wrong with refering to God as “She.”

This started making me suspicious of the text book, “Catholicism in the third millennium” by Thomas Rausch. Nothing in the assigned reading so far has raised any eyebrows but I started reading other chapters and found the following:
"Jesus did not come to Earth to find a church"
He also questions why homosexuals cannot have committed relationships.

I looked to the front of the book for an imprimatur, and of course could not find one. This lead me to the introduction where he says, “Perhaps the best book on Catholocism is Richard McBrien’s volume by the same name.”

The name Richard McBrien set something off in my head and of course, there was a story on him in the July/August 2005 edition of “This Rock”

So now I’m wondering what to do. Do I speak directly to the Chancellor and explain my concerns with her teaching against Rome, do I go to my parish Priest? I don’t think I can write the Bishop because the Chancellor has said that she helps go through the letters to the Bishop!!

Any suggestions would be welcome!
[/quote]

It’s one thing to explain the Church’s teaching, while noting by the way that one has problems with it - and something very different, to substitute one’s own difficulties for what the Church teaches.

It is not clear which of these is happening.

What you can always do about this, is pray for those who are teaching.

Hope that helps. ##


#3

[quote=tikiboy]Currently, I’m taking a RCIA class to obtain my chatechist certificate. This class is also being taken by adult Catholics who have never been confirmed, but baptized.

This class is being taught by the chancellor of the diocese so I thought that this class would be taught by someone who knows what they’re talking about.

Things began getting a little wierd a few weeks ago when the teacher said that Jesus did come to Earth to find a church. The next week she let it be known that if girls want to be priests than she couldn’t see a reason why they couldn’t. She refers to God as “She”, justifying it by saying God posses both male and female qualities and there’s nothing wrong with refering to God as “She.”

This started making me suspicious of the text book, “Catholicism in the third millennium” by Thomas Rausch. Nothing in the assigned reading so far has raised any eyebrows but I started reading other chapters and found the following:
"Jesus did not come to Earth to find a church"
He also questions why homosexuals cannot have committed relationships.

I looked to the front of the book for an imprimatur, and of course could not find one. This lead me to the introduction where he says, “Perhaps the best book on Catholocism is Richard McBrien’s volume by the same name.”

The name Richard McBrien set something off in my head and of course, there was a story on him in the July/August 2005 edition of “This Rock”

So now I’m wondering what to do. Do I speak directly to the Chancellor and explain my concerns with her teaching against Rome, do I go to my parish Priest? I don’t think I can write the Bishop because the Chancellor has said that she helps go through the letters to the Bishop!!

Any suggestions would be welcome!
[/quote]

I would speak with her and challenge her in the group. If this nproduces no change write the Bishop and request a reply from him. Speaking to your pastor is also not a bad idea. You can also mark the envelope as “Private and Personal”. In most cases this won’t be opened by anyone except the Bishop.


#4

[quote=Gottle of Geer]## It’s one thing to explain the Church’s teaching, while noting by the way that one has problems with it - and something very different, to substitute one’s own difficulties for what the Church teaches.

It is not clear which of these is happening.

What you can always do about this, is pray for those who are teaching.

Hope that helps. ##
[/quote]

Sorry I wasn’t more clear, but while in class, the teacher will mention what church teaching is, then add her commentary afterwards.

The textbook on the other hand presents the author’s views as church teaching, or in some cases, could infer that it is church teaching. This is probably the reason why the book doesn’t have an imprimatur.

I’ll follow your tip and pray for the teacher, and I’ll also pray for the students that they aren’t led astray by a textbook with its own agenda.


#5

Hate to say this, but it sounds like the teacher has her own agenda as well. Taking unformed (read uninformed) future Catholics and inserting her own ideas is a good way to instill odd ideas into people’s heads. Please take Br. Rich’s advice, prayer is all well and good, but action along with the prayer is what is needed in this situation… in my opinion.


#6

[quote=tikiboy] She refers to God as “She”, justifying it by saying God posses both male and female qualities and there’s nothing wrong with refering to God as “She.”
[/quote]

Contact your local bishop and tell him that you are confused by what is being taught in class and would like his guidance. Start off with why God the Father should be considered a ‘she’.


#7

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]I would speak with her and challenge her in the group. If this nproduces no change write the Bishop and request a reply from him. Speaking to your pastor is also not a bad idea. You can also mark the envelope as “Private and Personal”. In most cases this won’t be opened by anyone except the Bishop.
[/quote]

I agree with this advice, but instead of writing the Bishop, call his office or go down there and speak with one of his assistants about this. I would contact the Parish priest first though. maybe take good books with you to class and get chummy with the other students and maybe start an outside discussion with them at coffee.


#8

[quote=tikiboy]Sorry I wasn’t more clear, but while in class, the teacher will mention what church teaching is, then add her commentary afterwards.

The textbook on the other hand presents the author’s views as church teaching, or in some cases, could infer that it is church teaching. This is probably the reason why the book doesn’t have an imprimatur.

I’ll follow your tip and pray for the teacher, and I’ll also pray for the students that they aren’t led astray by a textbook with its own agenda.
[/quote]

You are correct that IS the reason it does not have an imprimatur. Canon Law says that no text is to be used for Catechesis (teaching) that does not have one. Also the new National Directory for Catechesis says that there is no place for personal opinion in catechesis, period. It also says that the content of ALL catechesis must be rooted in the Catechism of the Cathollic Church. Ask for the Catechism reference number.

If you are going to be a catechist you need to get a copy of the new National Directory for Catechesis. Every catechist should have one.

P.S. you can also obtain a summary version from USCCB publishing # 5-696


#9

the fact that your diocese has a woman for a chancellor instead of a priest suggests the bishop may not be responsive to you concerns. Nevertheless, since he is the direct superior of the chancellor you must express your concern to him. do so in writing, be specific about exactly what was said in class, quotes, dates, exactly what is problematic about the book and course materials. Sign your name. Be explicit about the damage this is doing to you in your faith journey.


#10

[quote=asquared]the fact that your diocese has a woman for a chancellor instead of a priest suggests the bishop may not be responsive to you concerns.
[/quote]

Just curious, if the bishop turns out not to be responsive, what would be the next step?


#11

[quote=Sir Knight]Just curious, if the bishop turns out not to be responsive, what would be the next step?
[/quote]

if the diocesan training courses required for your position are based on heretical material, bypass diocesan programs and get your catechist or DRE certification from a reliable program, such as Franciscan University of Stuebenville summer programs or distance learning.


#12

[quote=puzzleannie]if the diocesan training courses required for your position are based on heretical material, bypass diocesan programs and get your catechist or DRE certification from a reliable program, such as Franciscan University of Stuebenville summer programs or distance learning.
[/quote]

Wow, this dilema makes me sick. i hope you can clean up this situation by following the correct line of authority as Brother Rich suggested. I don’t know what comes aftrer the Bishop but there is something. there is an organization of lawyers in the southwest - what is it called? Does anyone know? I found out about it thru a Stubenville number that I called, when I had a question about the building of a new church in my town. They were very helpful with telling me the correct channels to go thru. I do hope you follow thru and there are othe places to get your training as puzzleannie said.


#13

[quote=Eliza10]Wow, this dilema makes me sick. i hope you can clean up this situation by following the correct line of authority as Brother Rich suggested. I don’t know what comes aftrer the Bishop but there is something. there is an organization of lawyers in the southwest - what is it called? Does anyone know? I found out about it thru a Stubenville number that I called, when I had a question about the building of a new church in my town. They were very helpful with telling me the correct channels to go thru. I do hope you follow thru and there are othe places to get your training as puzzleannie said.
[/quote]

You would go to the Apostolic Nuncio after the Bishop, Archbishop or Cardinal who heads your Diocese. There is a group St. something, St. Joseph society or something like that.


#14

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