No longer a Roman Catholic

Hello, Forum Members,

To avoid even the possibility of unintentionally
offending in my posts, I will have to state that I no longer
can be considered a Roman Catholic.
I am grateful to those who raised me for demonstrating

piety, inculcating the beauty and dignity of adoring

God, the importance of prayer and the obligation to care

for the needy. [Summarized in the "Spiritual and

Corporal Works of Mercy"…beautiful statements.]

And to my fellow Catholics,

Pray for me, as I will for thee,
That we may merrily meet in heaven.

And, if the faith that we once held in common
reflects God’s plan, then you are blessed.

Maureen [reen12]

Why did you leave?

Maureen, if you don’t mind my asking:

Why did you leave?

Did you join another Christian faith?

Yes, I will pray for you. Please pray for me, too? Holding our hands together in prayer is a beautiful and powerful way to combat evil and hold up the good. (I hold very dear my Catholic faith. It is precious to me as I have fallen in love with God more than I ever could have imagined).

I’ll keep you in my prayers… :gopray:

But why on earth would you possibly want to leave this wonderful Church of ours?:confused:
God Bless,
Annunciata:(

Dear Lisa4Catholics and SusanL, and Annunciata,

It’s taken so much energy for me to finally
conclude that I could no longer be considered
a Roman Catholic, that there’s not much energy left
tonight to convey why I no longer fit in.

I can say that at age 12 I began to doubt, but
all of my teachers, my whole Irish Catholic
family were devout Catholics…what was I to do?
I was afraid…

I was afraid for the next 47 years.

I don’t want to be afraid anymore.

reen12

You didn’t say what you gravitated toward. Not that you have to of course, but obviously a number of people here are curious.

Reen

I think you have a beautiful heart and good person. The catholic church is probably the most difficult religion, but the most rewarding. Every time I get discouraged or think I have it bad-I look at the Crucifix hanging over my bed-and realize what the son of God did for me-the suffering he went through, how the pain was tenfold more excruciating as he was pure-while we are not-and what he endured.

I would recommend going out during this Lenten season and buy the PASSION and watch it again, and then decide if you really think some other FALSE faith is worth your heart.

[quote=reen12]Hello, Forum Members,

To avoid even the possibility of unintentionally
offending in my posts, I will have to state that I no longer
can be considered a Roman Catholic.
I am grateful to those who raised me for demonstrating

piety, inculcating the beauty and dignity of adoring

God, the importance of prayer and the obligation to care

for the needy. [Summarized in the "Spiritual and

Corporal Works of Mercy"…beautiful statements.]

And to my fellow Catholics,

Pray for me, as I will for thee,
That we may merrily meet in heaven.

And, if the faith that we once held in common
reflects God’s plan, then you are blessed.

Maureen [reen12]
[/quote]

[quote=reen12]Dear Lisa4Catholics and SusanL, and Annunciata,

It’s taken so much energy for me to finally
conclude that I could no longer be considered
a Roman Catholic, that there’s not much energy left
tonight to convey why I no longer fit in.

I can say that at age 12 I began to doubt, but
all of my teachers, my whole Irish Catholic
family were devout Catholics…what was I to do?
I was afraid…

I was afraid for the next 47 years.

I don’t want to be afraid anymore.

reen12
[/quote]

Dear Reen,
I understand fear very well and it can certainly cloud the intelect…
I have been afraid ever since I can remember…I’m part Irish and I don’t quite know if it is inherited or just part of the culture but please , please take a second look!!!
I saw from another thread of yours that you are considering Judaism? A few years ago, I had a deep conversion experience of my faith and I felt led to search out the “Jewish roots” of the Faith and everything Jewish became so appealing to me… Then I realized that our Catholic tradition comes from the Jews…even the Messiah…our beautiful Yeshua, I really came to know HIM at that time in a much deeper way due to my search…hence giving me a much deeper appreciation of my Catholic Faith to which I’m a convert …I was a Baptist…
I think you should look to the Jews who have become Catholic before you make up your mind…you might be very surprised at what they have to say.
God Bless,
Annunciata:)

Hello.

Thanks, BulldogCath, for thinking that I have a
good heart…I like to think that I do. Those who
love me tell me that I do.

If you can bear with me for a short personal
annecdote:
I can remember, as if it was yesterday,

being 6 years old, sitting in a classroom,

the sunlight streaming in the window, a small

catechism opened to the first page,

and reading:

Who is God?

God is the Supreme Being Who made all

things.

My little heart sang with joy over this,

and my heart filled with a love of God that

has not diminished one iota in 50 plus years.

As I progressed through school, the

catechism got larger and more

complex…treating topics such as

what “types” of grace there are etc.’

and how each human is enmeshed in

original sin…til my head spun.

I would never have chosen this path

[font=Arial]for myself. But it was my path, because[/font]
[font=Arial]I was born into a Catholic family.[/font]
[font=Arial][/font]
[font=Arial]I have no intention of joining another Christian[/font]
[font=Arial]denomination. I would like to embrace Judaism,[/font]
[font=Arial]but I wouldn’t fit in there because I could not[/font]
[font=Arial]pray that the Messiah will come…because maybe[/font]
[font=Arial]He has already come.[/font]
[font=Arial]All I want to do is to pray to the God I knew[/font]
[font=Arial]when I was 6.[/font]
[font=Arial]Someday I will go to a temple, just to[/font]
[font=Arial]join in the prayers, not to convert.[/font]
[font=Arial]I hope they’ll take me in. Maybe I could be[/font]
[font=Arial]considered a “righteous Gentile.”[/font]

[font=Arial]God bless each of your hearts,[/font]
[font=Arial]reen12[/font]

How sad this is to hear. Fear is not from God or Catholicism. Jesus once and for all destroyed our reason for fear on the cross. Fear comes instead from Satin he uses it as a tool to steal souls. I will pray for you as your fear may be something that is paralizing your ability to accept Christ through his ordained Church.

May God bless you and hold you in his loving care

Reen,

You might consider quakers, they’re pretty short on sermons and rules to the faith and big on just doing stuff together. Wasn’t my thing but sounds like it may be the direction you’re going in. Good luck.

[quote=reen12]Hello.

Thanks, BulldogCath, for thinking that I have a
good heart…I like to think that I do. Those who
love me tell me that I do.

If you can bear with me for a short personal
annecdote:
I can remember, as if it was yesterday,

being 6 years old, sitting in a classroom,

the sunlight streaming in the window, a small

catechism opened to the first page,

and reading:

Who is God?

God is the Supreme Being Who made all

things.

My little heart sang with joy over this,

and my heart filled with a love of God that

has not diminished one iota in 50 plus years.

As I progressed through school, the

catechism got larger and more

complex…treating topics such as

what “types” of grace there are etc.’

and how each human is enmeshed in

original sin…til my head spun.

I would never have chosen this path

[font=Arial]for myself. But it was my path, because[/font]
[font=Arial]I was born into a Catholic family.[/font]
[font=Arial][/font]
[font=Arial]I have no intention of joining another Christian[/font]
[font=Arial]denomination. I would like to embrace Judaism,[/font]
[font=Arial]but I wouldn’t fit in there because I could not[/font]
[font=Arial]pray that the Messiah will come…because maybe[/font]
[font=Arial]He has already come.[/font]
[font=Arial]All I want to do is to pray to the God I knew[/font]
[font=Arial]when I was 6.[/font]
[font=Arial]Someday I will go to a temple, just to[/font]
[font=Arial]join in the prayers, not to convert.[/font]
[font=Arial]I hope they’ll take me in. Maybe I could be[/font]
[font=Arial]considered a “righteous Gentile.”[/font]

[font=Arial]God bless each of your hearts,[/font]
[font=Arial]reen12[/font]
[/quote]

The Messiah has come and He will come again and guess what:) He is Jewish.God Bless You
PM me if you want to talk,also I will look for Jewish converts that embace their Jewish roots,The coming home network has one I have seen on EWTN that is great and he still wears his yamika(sp)God Bless

Reen,
Just another thought…Maybe you should talk to Rosalind Moss right here at Catholic Answers in Ask The Apologist…she is a convert from Judaism.

Dear Tlaloc,

Thank you for your reply.

Judaism demonstrates a great reverence for the
Name of God, and has a deep sense of the sacred.
It was the faith that Jesus, Mary and Joseph offered
worship to God through.

The Quakers? I’m glad to hear that it wasn’t
your “thing.” Since you accept Jesus as the
Messiah, I’m glad that you’re a Catholic.

Again, thanks for your observations.
reen 12

Dear Maureen,

My heart goes out to you and there is a candle alight in front of the holy icons.

Think deeply and prayerfully while you are reaching your decision… and could I bring your attention to an article in The Jerusalem Post from 3rd March about someone who went the other way…

The Jerusalem Post

jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=JPost/JPArticle/ShowFull&cid=1109820000769

"What caused a former Orthodox Jew and son of Holocaust survivors to join the Orthodox Christian priesthood and serve Israel’s Christian immigrants?

“Young ben Baruch was encouraged to study and embrace the languages and philosophies of his parents - Talmud, Torah, Jewish literature, Zionism, Hebrew, Yiddish, Russian, Ukrainian - and the language of the people who had just killed some 300 of his relatives: German…”

May I suggest reading A Story of A Soul, the autobiography of St. These of Lisieux.

amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0935216588/103-5854868-9111042

St. Therese described her life as a “little way of spiritual childhood.” She lived each day with an unshakeable confidence in God’s love. “What matters in life,” she wrote, "is not great deeds, but great love."
She is a saint in the church, her spirtuality is not complicated, it is the epitomy of simplicity. She did not worry about types of graces but doing little things for Jesus (by doing things for others) with great love.

[quote=reen12]Hello.

Thanks, BulldogCath, for thinking that I have a
good heart…I like to think that I do. Those who
love me tell me that I do.

If you can bear with me for a short personal
annecdote:
I can remember, as if it was yesterday,

being 6 years old, sitting in a classroom,

the sunlight streaming in the window, a small

catechism opened to the first page,

and reading:

Who is God?

God is the Supreme Being Who made all

things.

My little heart sang with joy over this,

and my heart filled with a love of God that

has not diminished one iota in 50 plus years.

As I progressed through school, the

catechism got larger and more

complex…treating topics such as

what “types” of grace there are etc.’

and how each human is enmeshed in

original sin…til my head spun.

I would never have chosen this path

[font=Arial]for myself. But it was my path, because[/font]
[font=Arial]I was born into a Catholic family.[/font]
[font=Arial][/font]
[font=Arial]I have no intention of joining another Christian[/font]
[font=Arial]denomination. I would like to embrace Judaism,[/font]
[font=Arial]but I wouldn’t fit in there because I could not[/font]
[font=Arial]pray that the Messiah will come…because maybe[/font]
[font=Arial]He has already come.[/font]
[font=Arial]All I want to do is to pray to the God I knew[/font]
[font=Arial]when I was 6.[/font]
[font=Arial]Someday I will go to a temple, just to[/font]
[font=Arial]join in the prayers, not to convert.[/font]
[font=Arial]I hope they’ll take me in. Maybe I could be[/font]
[font=Arial]considered a “righteous Gentile.”[/font]

[font=Arial]God bless each of your hearts,[/font]
[font=Arial]reen12[/font]
[/quote]

My dear Reen…

I feel your heartache but also feel your freedom. You are such a sweet soul. You and I both search for the God that is beyond dogmas and beyond the complicated ideas of religion. I too have struggled with Jesus. To deny him is a fatal wound to the heart but to worship him is the fatal wound to the mind. No one else would understand that but possibly you and I. You know that I always wish you the best and would gladly sit up with you and help you through this tough time in your life. I’ve been through this recently myself. I will pray to the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob for your heart and mind to come together as one in perfect peace. Blessings to you…

Peace…

Maureen –

I am praying for you right now that God will pour His Love out on you, and that you will know without a doubt that He is Love, He is Truth, He is the Way and He is the Life.

There is no greater love than Jesus displayed when He gave His life for you and for me – for us all – on the cross.

Maybe instead of looking at the Church as something full of “rules,” you can look at them as safeguards Our Lord has given us so that we can attain eternal life.

Just as a parent sets rules so children don’t get hurt (don’t touch the stove, don’t play with the socket, etc.), so Our God provides us with rules to help us through this crazy world of ours.

The rules are there to keep us safe, keep us free from sin. A life without rules is one of chaos and danger. Just think what the roads would be like if there were no rules for driving!

Keep praying, Maureen. And if you are interested in the Jewish roots of Catholicism, I know that Rosalind Moss has a book and/or tape series with that title. Her brother also works with the Hebrew Catholic Foundation – www.hebrewcatholic.com – you might find some great information there.

Hi Maureen,

Don’t despair, the Roman Catholic faith is so rich and diverse that you could devote your life to any one of its facets.

Maybe you need to study the Saints and find one that inspires you. Maybe you should read about the life of the Popes. Or read about the Protestant reformation to really get you back to being Catholic.

You sound like you’re just in a rut and need to explore the wider world of Roman Catholicism. Don’t give up the faith, but just try something different within the faith.

Dear Father Ambrose and ahimsaman,

Your replies brought tears to my eyes. So much
goodness.

Father Ambrose, I want you to know that when I
exchanged posts with you, I hadn’t reached this
decision. I have spent my entire adult life
clarifying points of Roman Catholic doctrine for
others who enquired, and I did this in good faith.

I was blessed with a first rate education in
philosophy and theology, and was considered
a brilliant student. But ‘brilliance’ isn’t
everything, is it? It was this capacity for
abstract thought that propelled me, as a
youngster, to deeply question what I was
being taught.

The piety of my grandmother touched me
deeply. I wish that I could accept what she
so cherished, but I can’t Father.

Please accept my deep gratitude for your
kindness and my respect for your scholarship.
Most of all, thank you for lighting a candle
before the icons.

Maureen [reen12]

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