No more bells?!?!


#1

Anyone else’s Church not ring the bells anymore when the priest rases the host and wine? :frowning:


#2

At our parish we do sometimes, and at other times we don’t. Here’s what the GIRM says about it:

150 A little before the consecration, a minister may ring a bell as a signal to the faithful. Depending on local custom, the minister also rings the bell at the showing of both the Eucharistic bread and the chalice.

If your parish used to do it and no longer does, it might be worth asking when the local custom changed, and what caused it.

Hope that helps.


#3

When I was a kid for some reason me and the other Altar Boy that would be serving the mass use to try to get to the bells first without looking like we were walking fast. :smiley: As an adult other Catholic Church’s I been to when they ring the bell it is just jam packed with nostalgia. :smiley:


#4

Thanks, Yeah you know its wierd my old church all the nuns dont live at the old convent anymore and all the old priests are gone…when i came back there was new priests. Good priests but none from my youth. And the Church Interior was completely Changed I had asked what happen to everyone and everything but the new priest didnt seem to know.


#5

Our local Bishop has mandated bell ringing during the consecration.


#6

So its a bishop that decides if the diocese can ring the bells or just that parish?


#7

Don’t know. Our priest just mentioned that they bought the bells because the Bishop said that he wanted bell ringing at all of the masses.


#8

Yes, an Altar server rings the bells at the Consecration - once for the Host and once for the Chalice.

We also ring our Angelus bells at 6:00 am, noon, and 6:00 pm - and we even pray it, if we happen to be there when the Angelus bell is ringing. :slight_smile:


#9

Its really good to hear so many peoples church’s still ring the bells. Me and my childhood buddy that was the other altar server i mentioned earlier feel kinda strange with some of the changes. not the new priests they are great but the liturgy is somewhat diffrent i remember when there use to be alot less singing. But maybe that was just my parish in the 80s


#10

Hi, I too felt things were very different when I returned to my old parish after being away for 12 years. Anyways we have always had the bells then when we got a new pastor he changed a lot of things one was no more bells. I talked to him about it and he said its not magic and all of a sudden Jesus magically comes when the bells come and he said it made it seem like people were dumb if they needed the bells to be reminded. I thought no its not magic, but it is a miracle. He let the daily mass people have the bells though. Interesting.Huh! Well we just got a new pastor in April and he brought the bells back and the altar servers use the patons I think thats what they are called we also restored the 100 year old tabernacle and it is beautiful it was down in the basement. I think it must be up to the pastor because one took it away and the other one brought it back.


#11

wow thats good you got some of the old traditions of your church back. I think the parish igrew up in has so many interior changes that if reversed it might cause more problems… Im not sure though.


#12

3 of us out of 9 people so far lost the bells… him i wonder if that ratio will stay the same.


#13

5 out or 15 hmm its still pretty close to the same as earlier. I wonder why some of our parish’s tossed the bells…well 5 of us anyways


#14

Our parish has the bells in three places, the epiclesis and then at consecration.

Does anyone else have bells at the epiclesis anymore? (I mean at the Holy Spirit part right before the consecration of the host).


#15

Yup, there are two of my local parishes that use 'em, always at both the epiclesis and the consecration


#16

Yes we use them at our Parish in the good old fashioned way!! When I became Altar Server Coordinator, I was always amazed at the length at which some servers would ring the bell and the brevity of some others. There was no uniformity. So, I did a little research and discovered the perfect way to make sure all rang then for the same amount of time.

We do it now as follows once at the consecration and three times at the elevation of the Sacred Host and the Chalice.

It has solved all problems. Wonderful tradition.


#17

our church does not ring bells because we do not have any. if we did, iam quite sure the bells would be ringing every week.


#18

Haha when i was an altar server some kids would go crazy with the bells too haha I can recall a few of the priests would ask a few of us directly to only ring the bells in case the kids with the bells were wild with them seems like even in warning they still went wild with them. I think that is a good ammount of times to ring the bells where did you find that resource on ringing the bells might I ask. I been reading alot of altar server manuals so i can get some ideas on how i can lay one out for my nephew to refrence at home and yet I havnt seen that yet although ringing them in a uniform matter is genious!:smiley:


#19

In my church, one of the altar servers rings a set of those hand-held bells (what are they called?) during the consecration.

The church bells (the ones in the steeple – each bell has a name, but I don’t remember them) ring all day long, on the hour and half-hour (but I don’t think they ring all night). I can hear them from my house if the wind direction is right. :slight_smile:

**Crazy Internet Junkies Society
**Carrier of the Angelic Sparkles Sprinkle Bag
Pace e Bene :slight_smile:


#20

At Ave Maria University we ring the bells (which are called the Sanctus Bells [which is ironic because almost no one rings the bells at the Sanctus anymore]) during:
the Sanctus (thrice)
the epiclesis
Consecration of the Host (three times)
Consecration of the P.B. (three times)
and as the Priest consumes the P.B.

I wonder if I can get them to ring it at the Domine non sum… again.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.