No wedding on Saturday evening


#1

My daughter is getting married this coming August and would like to have her wedding on Saturday evening in our parish church. Our priest told her today that since the Sabbath started at 4pm on Saturday she could not have her wedding Saturday evening. The latest time she could have her wedding on Saturday would be 2 PM.This was a surprise to her as well as to me and my wife.

We recently attended a 5 PM Saturday Mass in another parish in our Diocese where the priest announced that he would be presiding over a 7 PM wedding that evening in that church.

We’re confused. Is this Church doctrine or is it just the desire of our local priest not to have weddings on Saturday evening?


#2

My daughter is getting married in our parish at 7:30pm on this Saturday night 12/30/06.
Many weddings are celebrated at our parish on Saturday night.
Our son’s wedding three years ago was at 7:00 on a Saturday night.
I have never heard of any problem with Saturday night weddings.


#3

Nothing prevents a wedding from taking place Saturday evening. However the expectation for a Mass after 4pm Saturday would be that it would be a Sunday “vigil” Mass with the proper readings for that Sunday.

The Rite of Marriage can take place in any (with some exceptions) Mass just after the homily, much like Baptisms. It would be great to have the Rite of Marriage at the normal Saturday evening Mass. That way the Sacrament of Marriage would be properly celebrated within the larger parish community and not so “private” an affair. Sacraments are supposed to be community celebrations. We had one not long ago at a Sunday morning Mass at a local parish here. What better wedding than one with 900 mostly Catholic guests!


#4

If it helps any, I also attended a couple weddings that took place late on Saturday afternoons, ending by 6PM when the regular Saturday Mass was to take place.

It might indeed be the decision of your parish priest, or it might be the decision of your local bishop. If it’s just your parish priest’s choice, you might be entitled by Canon Law to ask your Bishop for a change in policy. Pastors have the right to make administrative decisions, but they’re still subject to the local Bishop.


#5

Appeal direct to Rome. Right now.
In all seriousness, the right of appeal to the Holy Father exists for every Catholic: but in this case, appealing to the bishop seems appropriate. But first talk to the parish priest- it is not a terribly nice thing to have to do to appeal above his head.


#6

Maybe consider a Friday evening. Many things are cheaper for Friday weddings.


#7

Does this Particular parish have a regular Mass Saturday evening?

Does the priest hear confessions on saturday Evening?

As one who is on my parishe’s Liturgy committe I can assure you that this very thing happens at my parish. Saturday evening Mass is at 6:30 PM. Some priests hear confessions on saturday evening. In childhood my parish priest sat in the “box” from 7-9 EVERY saturday.

If there is already regularly scheduled parish events they CANNOT be supplanted by a wedding. Your priest may have mentioned the sabbath thing becaue the parish vigil Mass is at/or overlapping you wedding request.

I have a great idea!! Why not have your daughter get married at the scheduled Mass. Celebrate the wedding with your parish family. Ask the priest if your daughter can get married during the Sat evening vigil Mass. That would be awesome.


#8

[quote= Sacraments are supposed to be community celebrations. We had one not long ago at a Sunday morning Mass at a local parish here. What better wedding than one with 900 mostly Catholic guests!
[/QUOTE]

I agree with you on the Wedding at a regular mass…I think that would be awesome. I do beg to differ on the fact that some Sacraments are NOT primarly a community celebraion…confession comes to mind as well as extreme unction er I mean last rites er I mean annointing of the sick.
Not saying annointing of the sick is exclusively a solo event but I believe the focus is not on community in that particular instance.OOOOps sorry for hijacking this thread NEVERMIND.
[/quote]


#9

I agree with you on the Wedding at a regular mass…I think that would be awesome. I do beg to differ on the fact that some Sacraments are NOT primarly a community celebraion…confession comes to mind as well as extreme unction er I mean last rites er I mean annointing of the sick.
Not saying annointing of the sick is exclusively a solo event but I believe the focus is not on community in that particular instance.OOOOps sorry for hijacking this thread NEVERMIND.


#10

There are difficulties with celebrating weddings during regular parish Masses.

For one thing, the Nuptial Mass liturgy is lost. The Nuptial Mass texts offer many helps to the new married couple, and there is no good reason to deprive them of the votive liturgy.

Second, it is difficult to maintain a proper focus on the Sunday liturgy AND the wedding. The wedding will tend to be the dominant theme: “Oh, 5:00 pm Mass…so and so was married.”

Much of the whole rush these days to suggest very public sacraments is another nod to “the way the early Church” did it. True enough, though back then everyone more or less knew each other in the small Christian communities. Not so anymore.

There is a tendency in some parishes to like to pile things on between the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist. In almost every case, the result I have seen is a race through the latter after the former went on for 45 minutes.


#11

Having a wedding Mass on a Saturday evening is not prohibited.

It would, however, be a vigil Mass for Sunday, which means a few things.

First of all, the Sunday readings must be used, your daughter would not be able to pick out her own readings.

Secondly, and this is where you are probably having the problem, is that a priest is restricted (by Canon Law) to saying no more than 3 Masses for a given Sunday.

If the priest is already saying a Saturday evening Mass, and has two Masses on Sunday. He could not say an additional Mass, even if he wanted to.

That might be the source of the problem there.


#12

But they are. Anointing of the Sick should always assure the person of the prayers of the parish for them. It is suggested that a “communial” Anointing of the sick and elderly be offered in parishes at least twice a year. Even Reconciliation is better celebrated a few times a year in community with individual Confessions available. It remined the parish of the communial effects of sin and that we are all sinners needing God’s help. I believe that there should be a ministry like EMHC to the home bound and sick. A ministry of Anointing of the Sick where several lay people visit the homebound and sick (Nursing home, Hosptial) for the purpose of giving them a better understanding of the Sacrament and the ability to request it. Some lay people should accompany the priest to celebrate the Sacrament (leaving the room for their Confession) But returning to assist with the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick.


#13

Our recently retired (5 years ago) priest was the only pastor for our very large parish for 15+ years.

Many, many, many weekends he would say Saturday 8 am mass, have anywhere from 1 to 3 weddings on Saturday (11, 1, and 3) and then 5 pm vigil. Then Sunday morning he had the 7:30, 9, and 11 masses. He did them ALL.

Even with weekends with no weddings, he would do the Sat. 5 pm and all 3 Sunday morning masses.

He was absolutely amazing.


#14

I know there are certain days with their own proper vigils that must be used (for instance, come evening this Dec. 24 one no longer had the option of Advent IV and had to use Christmas Eve texts), but I was not under the impression that every single Sunday of the year carried this with it. After all, the “anticipated Mass” - which is not, actually, a vigil - is only an option available.

One can fulfill the Sunday obligation all of Sunday or Saturday evening, but the canon stipulating this makes no mention whatsoever of a need for particular readings. The GIRM also makes no mention, when describing the guidelines for choosing the Mass and its texts, that Saturday evening Masses must be anticipated Sundays. So I would actually see no problem with using the nuptial Mass on Saturday evening. I would be open to compromise with someone saying this must take place before Sunday’s first vespers, but knowing that for years upon years Mass was not allowed before midnight (despite the liturgical day having technically begun), I’ll stand by Saturday evening nuptial Mass until I see the guideline forbidding it.

(NB - that is not an insistence that I’m right but more of an invitation for someone to show me the actual regulation on Saturday evening Masses)


#15

The texts used in specific liturgies are specified not in the GIRM but in the Documents on the Lectionary. There is a Chruch document that does specify that for a Saturday evening Mass to qualify as a anticipated Mass for Sunday it must use the proper readings for Sunday. Someone asked if attendance at ANY valid Mass in ANY Catholic Rite satisfies the Sunday obligation. How can someone attend an Eastern Church Divine Liturgy, they don’t use the same readings. The ANY Mass in ANY Catholic Rite applies to Mass on the Holy Day. The Eastern Churches do not have Saturday evening anticipated Mass for Sunday. I also don’t think Holy Day Vigil is available either in the Eastern Church.( not sure about that)
P.S. last answer since this thread has taken an unintentional right turn. Back to the original topic.


#16

We must be very, very, very careful here. The truth is really quite simple, but eludes many.

The details about the Sunday obligation in Canon Law do not get caught up in any details about the rubrics of what liturgy is celebrated.

SOME Saturday evenings are NOT “Sunday”. For example, on Saturday, September 14, the Second Vespers…and the Mass…are of the Holy Cross, which outranks the First Vespers of the occurring Ordinary Sunday.

Obviously, most parishes aren’t going to announce that there won’t be the “usual” Saturday “Vigil” Mass.

Similarly, some Sunday evenings are not “Sunday”…Sunday, June 23, at night, is the Vigil of John…not the usual Sunday.

The law is clear. There is NO stipulation that the Mass readings must be for Sunday. None whatsoever. If you attended Mass on Sunday night and your parish celebrated John’s Vigil, you have fulfilled the obligation.

You’re not thinking in the most liturgical vein, but you have made the Sunday obligation.


#17

most of our weddings take place on Saturday afternoon, some on Friday evening, almost always presided over by the deacon. Nuptial Masses, which are rare in this parish, can by Saturday morning at 10, Saturday afternoon at 2, or Friday evening. People seldom request other days and times, but if they did they would be accommodated. We do have Saturday evening weddings, time is 7 pm to allow time for church to empty after Mas, almost all are presided by deacon, not Masses.

Before all weddings 1/2 is allowed for flowers & set-up, and they have 1/2 to clean up. Rehearsals are always Thursday or Friday evening at 5, 6, or 7. We have had two weddings at Mass on Saturday evening in the last year, in both cases the readings for for the Sunday, not the usual nuptial readings. Brides were miffed when told they could not pick their own readings, but they get over it.


#18

Actually, in the Novus Ordo rubrics some Sundays allow for the Nuptial Mass. Not all Sundays, but your average Sunday in Ordinary Time can yield to a Votive Nuptial Mass.


#19

I believe Nuptial Masses may be celebrated (ie are not prohibited) on Sundays of Christmas and Ordinary Time by the following from GIRM:

  1. Ritual Masses are connected to the celebration of certain Sacraments or Sacramentals. They are prohibited on Sundays of Advent, Lent, and Easter, on solemnities, on the days within the Octave of Easter, on the Commemoration of All the Faithful Departed (All Souls’ Day), on Ash Wednesday, and during Holy Week, taking due account of the norms given in the ritual books or in the Masses themselves.

tee


#20

Please consider that he may have that restriction
because he has to hear confessions before the Saturday Vigil Mass. Also after Mass he may, as our priest does, visit those who are sick at home or in the hospital. The priest have many roles to play. That is why most required a six month planning before the date. Be flexible and assist the priest.


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