non Catholic practices forbidden?


#1

I was reading an old thread, and one of the posters quoted from the Council of Florence, and the Church condemned following the Mosaic law. Okay, I understand that(kind of) but then it went to say that even if you don't put faith into it, it is a mortal sin.
so if I was to ever have a son, am I forbidden from having him circumsized?

And the poster also said that the Church also condemned praying with non Catholics and participating in non-Catholic religious holidays, as well as even praying with noncatholics- is this true???


#2

[quote="TeenageConvert, post:1, topic:280032"]
I was reading an old thread, and one of the posters quoted from the Council of Florence, and the Church condemned following the Mosaic law. Okay, I understand that(kind of) but then it went to say that even if you don't put faith into it, it is a mortal sin.
so if I was to ever have a son, am I forbidden from having him circumsized?

And the poster also said that the Church also condemned praying with non Catholics and participating in non-Catholic religious holidays, as well as even praying with noncatholics- is this true???

[/quote]

Before the Catholics on the Forum weigh in, I would say that in regard to circumcision, it is not prohibited by the Church as a hygienic procedure (which itself is controversial today), so long as it is not performed as a religious ceremony of male initiation into the Old Covenant, which, for Judaism, is the Eternal Covenant. This is because Catholics (and Christians in general) believe circumcision of the flesh has been superseded by circumcision of the heart, and Jesus' death and resurrection has essentially fulfilled the Mosaic Law (Torah Law) with regard to ritual practices, if not moral requirements. On the other hand, Jews believe that the circumcision ritual itself is a spiritual ceremony; in fact, no Jewish ritual is entirely valid without the spiritual dimension. If you are not Jewish, however, you are neither required nor permitted to engage in this spiritual ceremony according to Jewish Law.

Catholic participation in Jewish holidays is another matter, which has been previously discussed and debated on this Forum. My view is that attending a Passover Seder, for example, would not be forbidden provided that you, as a Catholic, do not consciously participate in the Seder as a required religious ceremony, and understand that Jesus has become the Lamb sacrifice in human form, as represented by the Sacrament of the Eucharist. If I'm not mistaken, Pope John Paul II attended a Passover Seder, and I think priests on occasion do so as well. However, there is a tendency among some Catholics to become immersed in Jewish holidays and laws to the detriment of following their own Catholic Sacraments. I believe this behavior should be avoided, as it runs contrary to both Catholic and Jewish teaching.


#3

[quote="TeenageConvert, post:1, topic:280032"]
I was reading an old thread, and one of the posters quoted from the Council of Florence, and the Church condemned following the Mosaic law. Okay, I understand that(kind of) but then it went to say that even if you don't put faith into it, it is a mortal sin.
so if I was to ever have a son, am I forbidden from having him circumsized?

And the poster also said that the Church also condemned praying with non Catholics and participating in non-Catholic religious holidays, as well as even praying with noncatholics- is this true???

[/quote]

Circumcism is not prohibited by the Church provided it is does for medical/hygenic reasons and not for any religious reasons.


#4

[quote="TeenageConvert, post:1, topic:280032"]
I was reading an old thread, and one of the posters quoted from the Council of Florence, and the Church condemned following the Mosaic law. Okay, I understand that(kind of) but then it went to say that even if you don't put faith into it, it is a mortal sin.
so if I was to ever have a son, am I forbidden from having him circumsized?

And the poster also said that the Church also condemned praying with non Catholics and participating in non-Catholic religious holidays, as well as even praying with noncatholics- is this true???

[/quote]

These prohibitions were disciplinary measures of that time (1400s) and a response to the historical and cultural situation of the time. We are under a different canon of law and different directives from the Vatican.

Circumcision in modern times is not a religious ritual for non-Jews but is a medical matter.

The Church has given newer guidance of worship and prayer with non-Catholics. I suggest you read the documents of Vatican II and the Catechism rather than old threads on the Council of Florence.


#5

[quote="1ke, post:4, topic:280032"]
These prohibitions were disciplinary measures of that time (1400s) and a response to the historical and cultural situation of the time. We are under a different canon of law and different directives from the Vatican.

Circumcision in modern times is not a religious ritual for non-Jews but is a medical matter.

The Church has given newer guidance of worship and prayer with non-Catholics. I suggest you read the documents of Vatican II and the Catechism rather than old threads on the Council of Florence.

[/quote]

Disciplines change, but doctrines don't. So for disciplines certainly you need to be aware of the current laws.

But for doctrine, when Vatican II is silent on a certain matter you or you need further information or something else more clear, you can always refer to Florence or Vatican I or Trent or Nicea. After all, the Fathers at Vatican II cited all of those and other previous councils quite regularly.


#6

Please see my post in that older thread.

The problem is usually in the motivation.

Is it wrong to eat Kosher food? No.

Is it wrong to eat Kosher food, thinking that "maybe the Church is wrong that we don't have to keep the Mosaic law, so I'm going to observe it just in case"? Yes.


#7

Okay, thanks cor clearing that up.


#8

Question answered

CLOSED


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