Non-Catholic Tradition


#1

Catholics frequently hear criticism from non-Catholics about Tradition within the Church. However, these same non-Catholics adhere to their own traditions.

I’d like to use this thread to record traditions within non-Catholic churches.


#2

Those that recite the Apostles Creed. Tradition.


#3

So to start, here are some that come to mind:

  1. Sola Scriptura

  2. Canonicity of the books of the Bible

  3. Titles, Chapters, Versus of the books of the Bible

  4. Separation and numbering of the 10 Commandments

Please feel free to add the ones you know.


#4

Use of grape juice at communion service.


#5

Sunday School for adults and children?


#6

The Sinner’s Prayer

Alter call

Songs then sermon

Time it starts

Being able to appoint the pastor (rather than a pastor being appointed or by inheretance)


#7

The use of wedding rings. (Pagan in origin)

The choice to use vestments or not for clergy and even the choir.

The reverence of certain Bible commentators such as Dake and Thompson, yet the general rejection of the ECF.


#8

So many protestants seem to criticize the Church for using rituals and traditions, so why do they still go through the ritual of marriage? If they don’t believe in rituals, why don’t they just say to God directly, “I take this person as my spouse”? If they’ve interpreted that all external ritual is unnecessary, what are they worried about? :confused:


#9

[quote=kevb]So many protestants seem to criticize the Church for using rituals and traditions, so why do they still go through the ritual of marriage? If they don’t believe in rituals, why don’t they just say to God directly, “I take this person as my spouse”? If they’ve interpreted that all external ritual is unnecessary, what are they worried about? :confused:
[/quote]

Good point. If they can confess directly to God, interpret the bible their own way, and hop from church to church until they find a pastor who’s views agree with their own, then they should be able to pronounce themselves married too. No need for a mere human to perform a ceremony.

Malia


#10

[quote=Feanaro’s Wife]Good point. If they can confess directly to God, interpret the bible their own way, and hop from church to church until they find a pastor who’s views agree with their own, then they should be able to pronounce themselves married too. No need for a mere human to perform a ceremony.

Malia
[/quote]

Exactly. If we didn’t have the outward observances of the wedding ceremony, what would the definition of marriage be?


#11

Sola Scriptura

I’m not a thoelogian or even a strong Bible scholar. My “education” consists of Catholic school (which does not focus solely on the Bible, obviously), some comparitive religion courses in college, one New Testament course taught by a Methodist (great teacher, btw), and my own periodical study. So, sometimes during this study, when I read arguments by different Protestants / Evangelicals / Fundamentalists etc., it can become very easy to get confused. You know, they SOUND logical, they’re argument makes sense, and I at times admittedly do not know my way around the Bible well enough to refute them. BUT, this “tradition” of theirs, is the one thing that I always come back to. If EVERYTHING you believe is based on the Bible alone, and you CANNOT point to where the Bible tells you to do that, then none of your arguments have even the possibility of being complete. I don’t understand how Protestants that believe in Sola Scriptura can get around this for themselves, in their own heads!


#12

[quote=bookgirl]Sola Scriptura

I’m not a thoelogian or even a strong Bible scholar. My “education” consists of Catholic school (which does not focus solely on the Bible, obviously), some comparitive religion courses in college, one New Testament course taught by a Methodist (great teacher, btw), and my own periodical study. So, sometimes during this study, when I read arguments by different Protestants / Evangelicals / Fundamentalists etc., it can become very easy to get confused. You know, they SOUND logical, they’re argument makes sense, and I at times admittedly do not know my way around the Bible well enough to refute them. BUT, this “tradition” of theirs, is the one thing that I always come back to. If EVERYTHING you believe is based on the Bible alone, and you CANNOT point to where the Bible tells you to do that, then none of your arguments have even the possibility of being complete. I don’t understand how Protestants that believe in Sola Scriptura can get around this for themselves, in their own heads!
[/quote]

I think it’s just simple distrust of authority. Their disagreement with the apostolic succession sort of trumps everything else in their minds. It’s unfortunate because without the Church authority, using sola scriptura allows every man to have his own interpretation of the most complex book ever written. Before you know it…30,000 denominations…each of which claim to have the correct interpretation.


#13

[quote=kevb]I think it’s just simple distrust of authority. Their disagreement with the apostolic succession sort of trumps everything else in their minds. It’s unfortunate because without the Church authority, using sola scriptura allows every man to have his own interpretation of the most complex book ever written. Before you know it…30,000 denominations…each of which claim to have the correct interpretation.
[/quote]

And there are different interpretations within each of those as well. I have two very faithful Bible Christian friends who love their church, and they both disagree on the assurance of Salvation!!! How can two people who disagree about that go to the same church?


#14

I’ve always wondered why non-Catholic churches have altars since they don’t participate in the one sacrifice, or any other for that matter. If no sacrifice, why have an altar?

Another traditions I thought of is:

Baby Dedication


#15

For me it’s their funeral traditions I don’t get. If they can’t pray for the deceased and the funeral is for those who are left behind, why is the “empty shell” of the body even there at all?


#16

[quote=Titanites]I’ve always wondered why non-Catholic churches have altars since they don’t participate in the one sacrifice, or any other for that matter. If no sacrifice, why have an altar?

Another traditions I thought of is:

Baby Dedication
[/quote]

My own stupidity. What is Baby Dedication? :confused:


#17

[quote=Fish]My own stupidity. What is Baby Dedication? :confused:
[/quote]

Since many Protestants don’t have infant baptism, parents instead commit to submit the child to the will of God and to raise that child accordingly.

Someone please correct me if I’m wrong.


#18

I myself was dedicated as a child. I don’t think it’s necessarily a bad thing, but compared to being actually baptised it’s like comparing an engagement to the actual wedding.


#19

The entire Protestant interpretation of the Bible is a tradition.


#20

Wednesday night service is a tradition.

It seems to me that the more strictly a church adheres to faith only the more likely they are to start inventing traditions.


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