Non-Catholics recieving sacraments?

the church teaches that if someone recieves eucharist and is outside communion with rome he takes it to his own damnation

Pope Pius VIII, Traditi Humilitati (# 4), May 24, 1829:
“Jerome used to say it this way: he who eats the Lamb outside this house will perish as
did those during the flood who were not with Noah in the ark.”12
Pope Gregory XVI, Commissum divinitus (# 11), May 17, 1835:
“… whoever dares to depart from the unity of Peter might understand that he no longer
shares in the divine mystery…‘Whoever eats the Lamb outside of this house is
unholy.’”13
Pope Pius IX, Amantissimus (# 3), April 8, 1862:
“… whoever eats of the Lamb and is not a member of the Church, has profaned

why then does the church encourage its ministers or allow them to give the sacrament to people outside communion with rome?

Paul VI, at the end of every Vatican II document: “EACH AND EVERY ONE
OF THE THINGS SET FORTH IN THIS DECREE HAS WON THE CONSENT OF THE
FATHERS. WE, TOO, BY THE APOSTOLIC AUTHORITY CONFERRED ON US BY
CHRIST, JOIN WITH THE VENERABLE FATHERS IN APPROVING, DECREEING,
AND ESTABLISHING THESE THINGS IN THE HOLY SPIRIT, AND WE DIRECT THAT
WHAT HAS THUS BEEN ENACTED IN SYNOD BE PUBLISHED TO GOD’S GLORY…
I, PAUL, BISHOP OF THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.”4

John Paul II, Catechism of the Catholic Church (# 1401):
“… Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing
of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church…”5
John Paul II solemnly confirming New Catechism
John Paul II, Fidei Depositum, Oct. 11, 1992:
“The Catechism of the Catholic Church, which I approved June 25th last and the publication
of which I today order by virtue of my Apostolic authority, is a statement of the Church’s
faith and of Catholic doctrine… I declare it to be a sure norm for teaching the faith.”6
Code of Canon Law
Canon 844.4, 1983 Code of Canon Law:
“If the danger of death is present or other grave necessity, in the judgment of the
diocesan bishop or the conference of bishops, Catholic ministers may licitly administer
these sacraments to other Christians who do not have full communion with the Catholic
Church, who cannot approach a minister of their own community and on their own ask
for it, provided they manifest Catholic faith in these sacraments and are properly
disposed.”7
Canon 844.3, 1983 Code of Canon Law:
“Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist, and
anointing of the sick to members of the oriental churches which do not have full
communion with the Catholic Church, if they ask on their own for the sacraments and
are properly disposed. This holds also for members of other churches, which in the
judgment of the Apostolic See are in the same condition as the oriental churches as far as
these sacraments are concerned.”8
Encyclical
John Paul II, Ut Unum Sint (# 46), May 25, 1995: “… Catholic ministers are able, in
certain particular cases, to administer the Sacraments of the Eucharist, Penance and
Anointing of the Sick to Christians who are not in full communion with the Catholic
Church…”
Non-Catholics receiving Communion 241
Speeches
John Paul II, General Audience, Aug. 9, 1995:
“Concerning aspects of intercommunion, the recent Ecumenical Directory confirms and
states precisely all that the Council said: that is, a certain intercommunion is possible,
since the Eastern Churches possess true sacraments, especially the priesthood and the
Eucharist.
“On this sensitive point, specific instructions have been issued, stating that, whenever
it is impossible for a Catholic to have recourse to a Catholic priest, he may receive the
sacraments of Penance, the Eucharist and the Anointing of the Sick from the minister of
an Eastern Church (Directory, n. 123). Reciprocally, Catholic ministers may licitly
administer the sacraments of Penance, the Eucharist and the Anointing of the Sick to
Eastern Christians who ask for them.”
Encyclical commenting on this heresy
John Paul II, Ut Unum Sint (# 58), May 25, 1995:
“… By reason of the very close sacramental bonds between the Catholic Church and the
Orthodox Church… the Catholic Church has often adopted and now adopts a milder
policy, offering to all the means of salvation and an example of charity among Christians
through participation in the sacraments and in other sacred functions and objects…
There must never be a loss of appreciation for the ecclesiological implication of
sharing in the sacraments, especially the Holy Eucharist

it has also been infallibely declared that only the catholic church has sacraments wich save,why then do we use language that seems to say heretical groups have ‘‘true sacraments’’?

Pope John Paul II, General Audience, Aug. 9, 1995:

"Concerning aspects of intercommunion, the recent Ecumenical Directory confirms and states precisely all that the Council said: that is, a certain intercommunion is possible, since the Eastern Churches possess true sacraments, especially the priesthood and the Eucharist.

 "On this sensitive point, specific instructions have been issued, stating that, whenever it is impossible for a Catholic to have recourse to a Catholic priest, he may receive the sacraments of Penance, the Eucharist and the Anointing of the Sick from the minister of an Eastern Church (Directory, n. 123).  Reciprocally, Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of Penance, the Eucharist and the Anointing of the Sick to Eastern Christians who ask for them."[35]

Pope John Paul II, Ut Unum Sint (# 48), May 25, 1995:

“Pastoral experience shows that with respect to our Eastern brethren there should be and can be taken into consideration various circumstances affecting individuals, wherein the unity of the Church is not jeopardized nor are intolerable risks involved, but in which salvation itself and the spiritual profit of souls are urgently at issue. Hence, in view of special circumstances of time, place and personage, the Catholic Church has often adopted and now adopts a milder policy, offering to all the means of salvation and an example of charity among Christians through participation in the sacraments and in other sacred functions and objects… There must never be a loss of appreciation for the ecclesiological implication of sharing in the sacraments, especially the Holy Eucharist.”

isnt he directly denying the definition of Eugene IV on how reception of the sacraments outside the Church does not profit one unto salvation ?

You see that the circumstances are extremely limited, do you not? If this subject is your ‘thing’, then I suggest that you engage in fervent prayer over it. When we opine, pontificate, gossip or murmur, we accomplish nothing. Search out what our Lord had to say about murmuring, for example.

Prayer is the answer.

OP, the Church has always believed that the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Churches have all seven valid sacraments. This is not some new innovation. The circumstances under which Protestants can receive Catholic sacraments are very limited.

ALL (Catholic or otherwise!), who receive Holy Communion in a Catholic Church should read 1Cor 11:23-29, first. God Bless, Memaw

Remember, “we confess one Baptism.” All the baptized are in some kind of communion with the Church, even if imperfect.

That heretical and schismatic groups can ordain true priests and offer true sacraments has long been the teaching of the Church. So recognizing that the Orthodox churches have those means of grace is nothing shocking or new.

As for the rare case of a dying Protestant asking for the sacraments from a Catholic priest, note that one of the requirements is that they manifest a Catholic faith in the sacraments in question. Consider also that, in that moment, they are not seeking the sacraments “outside the house” for once, but from the house.

If a Christian on his deathbed wants to confess his sins, be anointed, and receive viaticum from a Catholic priest, that priest would have to be pretty cruel to deny him. If the dying man’s heresy or schism is ultimately going to condemn him, God will handle that part, and it’s not as though there haven’t (probably) been Catholics who have outwardly received the last rites and then gone to their damnation for unrepented evil.

willymonfrete. You “quoted” the CCC . . .

John Paul II, Catechism of the Catholic Church (# 1401):
“… Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing
of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church…”5

I’ve read the CCC cover-to-cover.

When I saw your “quote” I thought something is amiss.

Something WAS amiss.

When I looked up the full CCC quote it made sense (unlike your truncated “quote”).

Here is what the fullness of CCC 1401 really says . . .

CCC 1401 When, in the Ordinary’s judgment, a grave necessity arises, Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church, who ask for them of their own will, provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments and possess the required dispositions.

You lost your credibility with me right there when you did that.

If this wreched out-of-context “quote” from you is by accident, I would suggest going deeper into your catechesis before posting on this subject again.

If this wreched out-of-context “quote” from you is on purpose, may I suggest the Confessional?

God bless.

Cathoholic

“Grave necessity” suggests the penitent may die.
Those “who ask for them of their own will” was ommitted by you.
Those “provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments” the same ommission.
Those “provided they . . . . possess the required dispositions” again ommitted.

Basically this is talking about a death-bed conversion.

The Church has ALWAYS been open to these.

why then does the church encourage its ministers or allow them to give the sacrament to people outside communion with rome?

Because they are being brought into communion with “rome”.

Hi, Willy!

…are you reading the same document as you’ve cited?:

Canon 844.4, 1983 Code of Canon Law:
[size=]“If the danger of death is present or other grave necessity

, in the judgment of the
diocesan bishop or the conference of bishops, Catholic ministers may licitly administer
these sacraments to other Christians who do not have full communion with the Catholic
Church,** who cannot approach a minister of their own community and on their own **ask
for it, provided they manifest Catholic faith in these sacraments and are properly
disposed.”7
Canon 844.3, 1983 Code of Canon Law:
“Catholic ministers may licitly administer the sacraments of penance, Eucharist, and
anointing of the sick to members of the oriental churches which do not have full
communion with the Catholic Church,
if they ask on their own for the sacraments and
are properly disposed.
This holds also for members of other churches, which in the
judgment of the Apostolic See **are in the same condition as the oriental churches **as far as
these sacraments are concerned.”8
…do you see it now?

There’s a immediate need of the Sacraments and a Confession of Catholic Understanding of the Sacraments; there’s an Apostolic Understanding of the Faith and the Sacrament; there’s an immediacy that their regular ministers cannot, due to the circumstances, remedy.

It is an extension of God’s Love and Mercy to those who, while not in full communion with the Church, do hold to Apostolic Faith and Apostolic Teaching on the Sacraments.

Maran atha!

Angel

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I meant (×2) . . .

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(Don’t know if it was auto-correct or me but there is the corrections).

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