Non-Christian Protestants


#1

CCC 1271 Baptism constitutes the foundation of communion among all Christians, including those who are not yet in full communion with the Catholic Church: “For men who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in some, though imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church. Justified by faith in Baptism, [they] are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church.” (2nd Vatican Council, Unitatis redintegratio 3) “Baptism therefore constitutes the sacramental bond of unity existing among all who through it are reborn.” (ibid., 22 § 2.)

This got me thinking, how many “Christians” are there out there that aren’t actually Christian?

Unitarians?
Quakers?
Mormons?
Jehovah’s Witnesses?
Unitarians?
The New Church?
Christadelphians?

Am I right to believe that these groups, that do not accept a Trinitarian baptism, are not Christian at all?


#2

Unitarian Universalists are not a Christian denomination, nor do they claim to be. However, there are some Christians who do identify as Unitarian Universalists, and some Unitarian Universalists who identify as Christians.

The Association itself is not Christian, but is open to Christians.


#3

Define ‘Christian’ please? Just baptism? Then whence Will?

Please do not think I ask as shouldn’t. Heck, everyone should ask, I hope. But I mean this as a nontheist who doesn’t understand the presumptions of your faith, and also one who may very well be joining the Society of Friends soon, in the most communitary, least- theological sense, since they do not require me to acquiesce to matters that cannot be demonstrated.

But I do understand and espouse their ethics (and even their form of ‘silent, expectant’ services), and wish the friendship of my fellow humans.


#4

In this sense, Christian means anyone who has been baptised “in the name of the Father, and of the Son and the Holy Spirit,” where the intent exists to baptise in the name of the Trinitarian God.


#5

Hi

What about those who call themselves “Protestants”? Are they “Christians”? They, I think, follow Church of England.

Thanks


#6

Ah, it’s much more complicated, paarsurrey. Oh dear, I expect you’ve opened up a huge can of worms here, but start with a certain Martin Luther in Germany, back in the early 1500’s by the Western reckoning.

Still, I think you’ll find this line of inquiry fascinating, please do follow it in depth – you will learn much about the entire play of history and power, economically and intellectually – theologically too if you wish.


#7

This may not be airtght, but I think your best rule of thumb might be the Nicene Creed. If someone can assent to its stipulations (interpreting “catholic” with the small “c,” if one must), then that’s a pretty good sign we’re talking about a Christian. Apply it to the groups that your original post mentions, and see what you get.


#8

Mormons, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Unitarians, & Christadelphians are not Christian. They have invalid baptism.
I have no clue as to who the :confused: “New Church” may be. Do you mean Swedenborgians, by any chance? I think that they have some very odd teachings, but if they baptize properly–which I don’t know–they may be at least loosely Christian. (This assumes that is who you are talking about.
Quakers…That is an interesting question. There are many kinds of Quakers. Some are Christian in a confessional sense (but do not have any baptism). Some are not Christian in belief. Some are quite Christian. (They may even baptize, though that isn’t a general Quaker practice).

This may not be airtght, but I think your best rule of thumb might be the Nicene Creed. If someone can assent to its stipulations (interpreting “catholic” with the small “c,” if one must), then that’s a pretty good sign we’re talking about a Christian. Apply it to the groups that your original post mentions, and see what you get.

:thumbsup:


#9

I Asked This Question To Our Priest During Rcia Last Year Because I Was 43 Years Old And Not Baptised…

He Said That God Makes Acceptions To This… Hence The Thief On The Cross!!

Remember That People Like Moses And Abraham Were Not Baptised Either…


#10

Nor were they Christians :wink:


#11

One must remember when looking at examples like the thief on the cross

The sacraments were created for us as a way to have the Grace of god dispensed, However, though the sacraments where created by God, he is not Bound by those sacraments.

God can do whatever he wants… God Said the thief would be saved. He alone has that authority. WE cannot assume that because he did it for the Thief that he will do it for us, and thus, this is why we have the sacraments.

Means to Obtain Grace…

On the subject at hand…

Scripture says to be baptized in the name of the father son and the holy spirit. If you don’t, it doesn’t count

Some people say, well, my baptism was in the name of Jesus.

This is not valid either because Jesus is only one part o the Triune God. Its like saying I follow Jesus, but I don’t follow God the Father.

You can’t be baptized into just one part.

So, no, if they do not baptize into the triune god, they are NOT Christian in the truest since.

In Christ


closed #12

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