Non-Denom a denomination?


#1

There’s probably been a thread on this somewhere already. But don’t you think that the term “Non-denominational” is pretty quickly becoming a denomination? I know that technically they’re not tied together under a doctrine or a catechism, and that they would say they’re only tied together under the Bible etc etc. (and we all know where that leads WITHOUT specified authority). But it really seems to me that they’re on the fast track to denominationalism in spite of their claims.


#2

I think if you pass around a plate asking for money, and then pay said money to a man who stands up and gives sermons about the way he interprets the Bible…make decisions on baptizing (babies or adults), have bible studies with someone in the lead…KABAM…non-denom is now denom.


#3

I agree 100%. It has long seemed to me that non-denominationalism is a denomination itself.


#4

Yes, because you are defining your group no matter how loosely affiliated by a certain set of beliefs. Once someone introduces other beliefs they couldn’t be a part of the group.

Just look up Calvary Chapel (non-denominational) and Vineyard Church (non-denominational) and you will see how Vineyard split from Calvary Chapel.
www.wikipedia.com

Many of these groups look down on words like religion or denomination to kinda define themselves as not part of this man made “system”, in doing that they make their own system.

I have had Jehovah’s Witnesses do the same thing in saying they are not part of a religion.
(I am pretty sure that religion means a framework of beliefs.)

So in separating yourself from one group you really do make another, no matter how much you say you don’t.

God Bless
Scylla


#5

Denomination or non-denomination? What’s the difference?

Speaking as someone who believes the Catholic Church is the one and only Church formed by Jesus Christ in the year 33 A.D. to me, denomination or non-denomination means either they believe or don’t believe in something that we do.


#6

If you prod non-denoms enough they’ll eventually admit they’re Baptists.


#7

Yes and No. Yes for the reasons already stated and no because, they are the pathway and the fulfillment of Luther’s statement of as many Churchs as their are heads.

May God Bless and Protect Us,
Jlcastagna

Your arms are to Short to box with God!:smiley:


#8

[quote=bookgirl]There’s probably been a thread on this somewhere already. But don’t you think that the term “Non-denominational” is pretty quickly becoming a denomination? I know that technically they’re not tied together under a doctrine or a catechism, and that they would say they’re only tied together under the Bible etc etc. (and we all know where that leads WITHOUT specified authority). But it really seems to me that they’re on the fast track to denominationalism in spite of their claims.
[/quote]

Many churches seem to mean “independent from affiliation” when they use this term. However, it is surprising how many non-denominational churches have a network of likeminded churches with which they affiliate.

In my part of the country, there was a “non-denominational, evangelical” church founded some years ago which has now spun off nine other congregations. This would make it a “denomination”, albeit, a small one!


#9

yes, they are a denomination…

i think it should be called, “haven’t found what i’m
looking for, and not quite sure what it is”

oh, and i know a couple of Catholics who have
gone to ‘non-denom’ churchs… one family has come
back to the Church…

:slight_smile:


#10

Each independent Protestant “non-denominational” church is really just another new Protestant denomination. Which means that there will soon be 100,000 Protestant denominations on earth, each one preaching their own unique and contradictory version of the gospel. (Perhaps there are already 100,000 Protestant denominations since there are every increasing number of new Protestant sects in Africa, Asia, South America, etc).

I believe the Protestant non-denominational church craze will be the ultimate destruction of Protestantism - this trend in Protestantism is certainly reducing to insignificance the “mainline” Protestant denominations right now.

I think the next wave in Protestantism will be the formation of “progressive” non-denominational churches that will consolidate the ever shrinking numbers of liberal Protestants into economically viable units. The Antichrist will come out of one of these progressive churches preaching a message of universal brotherhood and “toleration”. His message will be an amalgam of the worst heresies within Protestantism - health and wealth, universalism, OSAS, eugenics, licentiousness as virtue, greed as virtue, and above all, the irrelevance of the cross and personal suffering.


#11

[quote=Matt16_18]I believe the Protestant non-denominational church craze will be the ultimate destruction of Protestantism - this trend in Protestantism is certainly reducing to insignificance the “mainline” Protestant denominations right now.
[/quote]

This is a very good observation. You may well be right. The traditional “mainline” Protestant churches are suffering from dramatically reduced numbers.

[quote=Matt16_18] I think the next wave in Protestantism will be the formation of “progressive” non-denominational churches that will consolidate the ever shrinking numbers of liberal Protestants into economically viable units. The Antichrist will come out of one of these progressive churches preaching a message of universal brotherhood and “toleration”. His message will be an amalgam of the worst heresies within Protestantism - health and wealth, universalism, OSAS, eugenics, licentiousness as virtue, greed as virtue, and above all, the irrelevance of the cross and personal suffering.
[/quote]

A very interesting point. You may well be right. Already, many of the “mega-churches” – even the ones which “appear” to be relatively “conservative”, are preaching a message which could best be termed “Christianity-lite” (Or as CS Lewis put it, a religion of “Christianity and water”.)


#12

[quote=Genesis315]If you prod non-denoms enough they’ll eventually admit they’re Baptists.
[/quote]

LOL

That’s my experience too. Non-denom = baptist-ish?


#13

Jmj

I’m really fascinated by this trend… this “non-denominational” movement. I think diversity is a wonderful thing! I really do! But, this movement of “non-denominationalism” within Protestantism is not true diversity – there is something much more fundamentally sinister brewing beneath this new trend. Spiritual ambiguity perhaps?

Like I said though, I’m fascinated by this movement. Talking to non-denom Christians and hearing what they have to say about their beliefs is… I don’t know… it’s sort of entertaining in a strange kind of way.

And Matt16_18, really found your post very interesting as well! I’ve spent a lot of time trying to learn about this movement called “non-denominationalism” or whatever you prefer… but I’ve not spent a lot of time thinking about where it could end! I remember C.S. Lewis in Mere Christianity (I believe it was,) talking about how heresies always burn out, are destroyed, or destroy themselves (something to that effect)… maybe this movement will prove to be the “grease on the slide.”

“Boy… it sure seems like we’re picking up speed here. Yes sir, it looks like we’re moving a lot faster now. Okay, we’re starting to get a little nervous. Uhmmm… yeah… we’re definitely getting out of control! Wait a minute… what are we doing again!? What are we doing!!? What do we believe??? Should we call for help??? Who knows how to get us off this thing???” - I guess we’ll just have to pray and see.

May the Lord be with you!

Jason


#14

So, if someone says they go to the non-denominational church, can I ask, ‘which one’?


#15

[quote=cargopilot]So, if someone says they go to the non-denominational church, can I ask, ‘which one’?
[/quote]

Tee-hee! I already ask that question…many, many, many times… :stuck_out_tongue:


#16

[quote=Genesis315]If you prod non-denoms enough they’ll eventually admit they’re Baptists.
[/quote]

You’ve noticed that too. I always laughed at the fact that there is eight baptist churches or so (the good ole bible belt) in my rather small town and all pretty much agree on things (though I never figured out why they had eight churches in the same small town). I have also noticed that Non-denom are pretty much the same but, they feel to clostrophobic with a name (such as the baptist) so they pick something that seems less “closed in” and that is harder for non-non-denoms to hit at.


#17

[quote=Montie Claunch]You’ve noticed that too. I always laughed at the fact that there is eight baptist churches or so (the good ole bible belt) in my rather small town and all pretty much agree on things (though I never figured out why they had eight churches in the same small town). I have also noticed that Non-denom are pretty much the same but, they feel to clostrophobic with a name (such as the baptist) so they pick something that seems less “closed in” and that is harder for non-non-denoms to hit at.
[/quote]

Hello Montie…that sounds like my town! Maybe there are 500 people here…and I counted twelve protestant churches… eight Baptist…one pentecostal…one holiness church…church of god of prophecy :confused: and I am greatful for the one Methodist Church…they don’t consider us Pagan


#18

All Christians inherited teachings from somewhere. Things like the Trinity, Sola Scriptura, what baptism is/does/and who can have it did not just spontaneously create themselves in their heads–it was taught to them, and their teachers were taught it from someone else. Eventually you will find an actual historical theology. I think the non-denom tag is an attempt to be obtuse so that no one can pin down their theology and thus, no one can criticize it.

Scott


#19

[quote=Lillith]Hello Montie…that sounds like my town! Maybe there are 500 people here…and I counted twelve protestant churches… eight Baptist…one pentecostal…one holiness church…church of god of prophecy :confused: and I am greatful for the one Methodist Church…they don’t consider us Pagan
[/quote]

??? how did Pagan enter into the equation??? I didn’t say anything about anyone being Pagan. Simply that some feel closed in my denomenational names though they are for the most part (in beleifs anyhow) part of one. Could you elabroate on what you are saying because I am confused by what you’re saying about what I said.


#20

[quote=Lillith]Hello Montie…that sounds like my town! Maybe there are 500 people here…and I counted twelve protestant churches… eight Baptist…one pentecostal…one holiness church…church of god of prophecy and I am greatful for the one Methodist Church…they don’t consider us Pagan
[/quote]

[quote=Montie Claunch]??? how did Pagan enter into the equation??? I didn’t say anything about anyone being Pagan. Simply that some feel closed in my denomenational names though they are for the most part (in beleifs anyhow) part of one. Could you elabroate on what you are saying because I am confused by what you’re saying about what I said.
[/quote]

Yikes :bigyikes: Computer to user misunderstanding…

The denominations of protestantism around my area have absolutely NO understanding of Catholicism. For the most part they believe Catholics to be Idol worshippers, the Eucharist and statues in the church convince them of this (thus the Pagan comment) The Methodists have a better understanding…and are closer to Catholicism…

I had a Church of Holiness lady ask me if Catholics were Christian. A child asked if we get drunk in Church. The fact that we are Catholic is gossip.


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