NON MUSIC MASS

Does anyone like a non-music Mass ?
A Mass where everything is recited, not sung, and where
**you can completely focus on the words of the Mass without **
**the distraction **of flamboyant musicians and choir performers.



TOM

Well, if the choice is between flamboyant performers or just a recited Mass, I would choose reciting. But I prefer music at Mass, as long as it is good music!

My son, age 13, LOVES the “silent Mass,” as he calls it. This really hurts me because I am a liturgical musician! :rotfl:

I love week-day Masses – the absence of music makes the Word more intense some how.

'thann

I’m a liturgical musician, too. I’ve been a cantor and choir singer for more than 25 years. When I sing in the choir, I find myself very distracted, as if I have not really “attended” Mass. That’s the reason I do my choir singing in the Episcopal Church (that and the nice, fat paycheck, I should say) and limit my participation in my own parish to being the cantor.

I agree with 'thann above that it is wonderful to attend daily Mass with no music at all - it’s a great opportunity to concentrate on prayer without having to think about the music.

Betsy

[quote=baltobetsy]That’s the reason I do my choir singing in the Episcopal Church (that and the nice, fat paycheck…
[/quote]

:confused:

What on earth are you doing that for? Money? Not to sound harsh (though I realize this will sound harsh), would you be a cashier in an adult movie store since the money might be good? How about a receptionist at an abortion clinic since the money might be good? I can’t understand why someone would wish to even appear to support an ecclesial community that is heretical.

[quote=baltobetsy]When I sing in the choir, I find myself very distracted, as if I have not really “attended” Mass.
[/quote]

I really believe a lot of this has to do with the type of music chosen. Some music can draw you in; some can pull you away.

What on earth are you doing that for? Money? Not to sound harsh (though I realize this will sound harsh), would you be a cashier in an adult movie store since the money might be good? How about a receptionist at an abortion clinic since the money might be good? I can’t understand why someone would wish to even appear to support an ecclesial community that is heretical.
[/quote]

It is well known there that I am a Catholic, and an employee, not a member. Choral singing is my professional work, and this is where I found a job. My (very conservative and demanding) confessor has not raised any objections to my holding this position. I serve as an unofficial Catholic resource person, providing explanations if anyone has questions about Catholic teaching, clearing up misconceptions that may come up in the preaching, and helping my fellow singers on their path to Christ. Just this Easter, one of them was received into the Catholic Church, with much help and encouragement from me. I consider this church a kind of “mission territory” - a place to plant the seeds of truth, praying for the people all the while that eventually they will come to the fullness of the truth.

Besides the money, and the opportunity to set the record straight about the Catholic Church, I really enjoy the quality of the music. They have a commitment to good music - the joke is that Episcopalians are saved by good taste - they have a full-time organist/choir director who spends his days planning and practicing without having to worry about a “real” job. The choir has about 40 members, with professionals in each section, and the music we produce is definitely of professional quality. The music and the texts of the anthems we do nourish me spiritually in a way that nothing else does, and the fact that I can give my full attention to the music without concern for my own prayer is another plus. Professionally, this is a very fulfilling job.

No, I would not be a cashier in an adult movie store, or a receptionist in an abortion clinic, no matter how much money was involved. But these people are worshipping God the best they know how, and if I, by being there, can help them come to the fullness of truth, I will do that. As Walter E. Williams is wont to say, I am “pushing back the frontiers of ignorance.”

Betsy

My parish has an early-morning mass without music which I’ve attended for quite some time. Despite the early hour it is quite popular.

What I find when I attend other parishes, or even masses with music at my own, is that my attention wanders. They’re using an entrance hymn that’s not in the book? Well, I’ll just zone out for a couple of minutes. Oh, they’re gonna sing the Gloria but I don’t know the melody? There goes another couple of minutes. Hey, they’re singing the Psalm but it’s not the one in the missal. Can’t make out the words… Zzzzz.

None of this happens in our no-singing mass. No “performance” and my loss of concentration.

[quote=baltobetsy]I’m a liturgical musician, too. I’ve been a cantor and choir singer for more than 25 years. When I sing in the choir, I find myself very distracted, as if I have not really “attended” Mass. That’s the reason I do my choir singing in the Episcopal Church (that and the nice, fat paycheck, I should say) and limit my participation in my own parish to being the cantor.

[/quote]

I haven’t cantored in a couple years, but really, I went to Mass twice a weekend when I was cantoring because there was no focus at all on Mass. It was all on the music.

I do like a non-music Mass really early in the morning, though.

I go to a 'somewhat non sung mass’
It’s call the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom.
As a Byzantine Catholic, we chant everything (does that count as singing) however we have NO musical instruments. I have found the experience VERY reflective and rewarding. WIthout the musical instruments, you really get a chance to focus on the lyrics.

Go with God!
Edwin

[quote=Desdemona]I haven’t cantored in a couple years, but really, I went to Mass twice a weekend when I was cantoring because there was no focus at all on Mass. It was all on the music.
[/quote]

Cantoring doesn’t distract me - I’ve been doing it so long I can go on autopilot and still pray. Unless I’m in a new place doing a funeral or something, that is.

Betsy

NO!

Yes, I love the quiet every once in a while–versus the protestant songs that we sometimes sing—AMAZING GRACE—please, Lord, give me a break. Certain songs for certain places, and certainly not the Holy Catholic Mass.

I happen to like both. I go to daily Mass which has no music, and it is nice. It is a smaller community, and people know more about each other. However, my first form of pray is usually a song. Yes I am in a choir, although I agree when the directors get selfish and like to perform instead of providing prayful music it is a problem. I believe they should have songs that everyone can sing to or pick up quickly to participate in the Mass, which is what the congregations should be doing.

[quote=bquinnan]I really believe a lot of this has to do with the type of music chosen. Some music can draw you in; some can pull you away.
[/quote]

What about recorded music volume? :crying:
I recently attended a weekday Mass in another parish and as we were approaching the altar for Eucharist reception suddenly some very loud recorded music came blaring out…and continued until the dismissal…when the celebrant was reading the ending prayers, etc. he could not even be heard :mad: .
I thought it was probably the new altar servers (Father had complimented them on how well they were serving their first time)…However, after attending a few more Masses (only one I can make on my way to work) I discovered it was the priest with his remote control who started the music and didn’t bother to turn it down - guess he liked it a lot!
While the music he plays is ‘nice’ I don’t consider it to be appropriate for Mass and the volume makes it almost impossible to concentrate on a proper Thanksgiving before we are rushed out of the Church. I believe he is leaving for another parish this week and hopefully the new pastor has more sensitivity.

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