Not a true Marriage?


#1

I just do not understand annulments. How do they work? How can one possibly say “there was never a marriage to begin with,” when at first they said their vows and seemed to love each other, but then 8 years down the road they break up? How can that be so and if that is so then that entire time the two were making love they were actualy comitting fornication since they were never “truly” married. I don’t know that just sounds silly to me. A guest priest at my Church who was from Africa was AMAZED at how many annulments are given to Catholics in America.


#2

In that case it seems an annulment is another way of saying “it wasn’t meant to be.” Is this correct? Then where does the sin of divorce and remarriage come in?


#3

Man wants to marry Woman. Woman doesn’t care much for Man. Man puts a gun to Woman’s head and tells her they must be married. Woman consents and they have a wedding. Woman never wanted any of this. Therefore the marriage was not valid.

z’at help any?


#4

Yes exactly! I understand that point, but I’m talking about marriages when at first BOTH spouses desired one another but then years later, they break apart and an annulment is granted? I’m sure ALL annulments are NOT because of being “forced” or by gunpoint.


#5

Yeah, well… an annulment can only be granted if the marriage wasn’t valid at the time of the marriage. If it’s a valid marriage and they break up later, there shouldn’t be annulment.


#6

Please keep in mind a decree of nullity does not determine whether or not a marriage took place-- it absolutely did. A tribunal determines whether or not a SACRAMENT took place on when the couple declared their consent and exchanged vows.

I highly recommend the book Annulment: The Wedding That Was by Michael Smith Foster if you are interested in understanding this complex and interesting topic. This book explains it very nicely.


#7

[quote=1ke]Please keep in mind a decree of nullity does not determine whether or not a marriage took place-- it absolutely did. A tribunal determines whether or not a SACRAMENT took place on when the couple declared their consent and exchanged vows.

I highly recommend the book Annulment: The Wedding That Was by Michael Smith Foster if you are interested in understanding this complex and interesting topic. This book explains it very nicely.
[/quote]

That’s very interesting, thanks.


#8

[quote=J.W.B.]if that is so then that entire time the two were making love they were actualy comitting fornication since they were never “truly” married.
[/quote]

NB That while one might say such a couple committed “material” fornication, there is no sin involved. Sin requires knowledge that one is sinning and consent of the will to commit the sin. Neither is present in the parties of a putative marriage.

tee


#9

[quote=1ke]Please keep in mind a decree of nullity does not determine whether or not a marriage took place-- it absolutely did. A tribunal determines whether or not a SACRAMENT took place on when the couple declared their consent and exchanged vows.

I highly recommend the book Annulment: The Wedding That Was by Michael Smith Foster if you are interested in understanding this complex and interesting topic. This book explains it very nicely.
[/quote]

According to Canon 1055 No valid Marriage can take place between two validly Baptized persons without it also being a Sacrament.

A civil/legal Marriage, yes. But as far as the Church is concerned not one the Church will recognize.

There are several books out there that try and soften the situation that far too many Catholics find themselves in, because someone didn’t want to tell them otherwise. For some reason we are afraid to call it as we once did “Living in sin” period.


#10

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]According to Canon 1055 No valid Marriage can take place between two validly Baptized persons without it also being a Sacrament.

A civil/legal Marriage, yes. But as far as the Church is concerned not one the Church will recognize.

There are several books out there that try and soften the situation that far too many Catholics find themselves in, because someone didn’t want to tell them otherwise. For some reason we are afraid to call it as we once did “Living in sin” period.
[/quote]

The book I recommended does not water it down. It very nicely explains the Catholic understanding of the Sacrament, and goes into detail on the topics of indissoluability, free will, consent, and impediments.


#11

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