Not important. Just something I would like to do


#1

I am thinking about making a cute little book for kids ages say 5-7 that deals with how a catholic child can be challenged in their faith in school and with their friends and family and how to be strong and just say no to temptation.
this is just for my own child, I have no intention of getting into the book biz.
while only a toddler now, it may take me some time to do this.

Are there any books out there now that are like this? If so, could you please let me know the title and info so I can find it and look it over?

I have made binder books and flash cards already. And she likes mine better than the ones from the store since she “helps” me with them.

Also, any ideas on the most common temptations. Catholic specific would help out too.

One thing I wanted to address was someone mocking the wearing of the cross.
Another was praying before meals. ( i know so far not Catholic specific LOL)
Nightly prayers/morning (if time permits…:o I need to work on that one…
Any other thoughts?
Lying? Not finishing homework or disclosing assignments?
I did not grow up Catholic so I am wondering if anyone here remembers that age and what they might have found helpful and understandable at that time in their lives.


#2

lets see what about peer pressure from friends to drink, do drugs, have sex…modesty issues


#3

At 5-7 years old?:eek: :eek: :eek:

Karin- I will lock her up in the house if I thought 5-7 year olds were doing this!

Tell me they are not… Am I that naive?:confused:


#4

Excuse me for a minute, I am getting dizzy and feeling faint.:o :frowning:


#5

Oh I am sorry Damascus…I thought you meant in general…perhaps you can do one for her/his teen years:D also.
Oh my I dont remember the 5-7 age range…it seems like it was so long ago…(my eldest is 15 already):eek: …
But it seemed that the biggest issues at that time where telling lies/fibs; doing well in school, respecting elders …does that help any?


#6

No-No…snap outta it…no need for faintness or dizzy spells…


#7

also if you are looking for already published books perhaps one of the homeschooling parents can help out…it seems that at times the resources they come across are great and the non-homeschoolers have no idea about them…perhaps Rob’s Wife can help out with this one:confused:


#8

Oh, just thought of another one! Using the Lords name in vain and swearing.

Yes indeed. I remember getting the spanking of my life for swearing at age 6.

The funny thing was my dad asked me where I heard that word before (and it was from HIM that I heard it)!!!So I did not tell him since I was afraid I would get more of a spanking! So I lied!!! Boy did I feel bad, swearing and lying all in one short period of time!

My sister. Poor thing. She got blamed.


#9

Hi,

What about how God loves us and/or how nature etc. all comes from God.:smiley: :thumbsup:


#10

A problem my sister had a problem with (as well as girls I went to school with in the early years) was bossiness!!! Oh what a major pain.

I agree with the lying part, that is major beginning at that age. Same with potty humor and potty mouth. Oh, and crushes can begin at around age 7. TV watching and music.

I once volunteered at a childcare center in the inner city in Minneapolis. Well a 4 year old asked if I could be his girlfriend and I said “oh, that’s sweet”. Then he proceeded to tell me how he wanted to (moderators, please forgive me, I am trying to show an example hear and these are his exact words) “lay me down and lick me up and down”. Now, where do you think he even heard these words? The TV and music choices of his parents.

Purity issues should begin to be discussed at the young age of 5 b/c the world is already discussing it with them and well, the message is very immoral.


#11

At 5-7 I recall being scolded by my mother for being mean to other little girls. Basically, if 3 of us got to play together, 2 of us played and were mean to the other girl. Of course on other days I was the other girl being made fun of or whatever.

Other issues to consider- behaving properly in Church, owning up to one’s own errors (not lying about them), jealousy and coveting other people’s things.

By the way, I think this is a great idea and if it were a published book I would definitely buy one for each of my nephews and nieces.


#12

Thanks!:thumbsup: Great ideas. I intend this to be a “avoiding pitfalls” book more than anything.

Great ideas to add into the pitfall category.


#13

Thanks! Yes indeed you bring up a VERY good point about coveting!!!

That was a biggie too I recall, and clicky bullying stuff…

Thanks! I will let you know if I like the end product - Then you can review it LOL and then decide if you want one, I would just give you one minus material costs. I dont want to be in the book biz!:eek:


#14

Great ideas, but that is not a pitfall to avoid!:eek: LOL

That would be a separate book, and I think I will do that too!:thumbsup:

I can see how my OP was confusing since I mentioned prayers and stuff- what I meant was overcoming Peer pressure since most kids dont do it in public and I want her to do it no matter what even if she is the ONLY one doing it!


#15

Hi,

OOPS your right!!:o I OBVIOUSLY misread the OP. Oh well, that is what happens when you read something too fast.:o


#16

We just had to have a talk about what swear words were.
My girls, being homeschooled and hanging with other Catholic kids thought that when I said “Poopie” it was a swear word.
They saw “A Christmas Story” and asked what the mother of all swear words was. They never heard it.

So for one try, they were allowed to use the words I spelled out for them. I sent them both upstairs to say the words to each other. When they came back down I told them that now since they knew the words, it was a sin if they used them.
However I also said, "If you want to know what something means, ask me. You won’t be punished for saying it. Don’t ask the person who said it, ask me."
My older one looked at me and said, “So what does s–t mean.”

The poor girl was so embarrassed she cried.

Now back to the thread.


#17

Oh no, the poor thing!

My MIL ans SIL have a theory about inappropriate language. They say, let 'em hear it at home, and don’t shield 'em from it. Better to hear it at home than at school, on the playground, in the neighborhood, etc. :rolleyes:


#18

Oh MY! Sounds like a sweetheart to me!! Maybe that is a good way for me to do this too with mine. I will share with you what I do now when we are in the car with daddy. Daddy has a bad habit of using some words in the car when driving, but I have a sense about when it will “pop” out and use my hands to cover her ears and I sing really loudly to block the pass if you know what I mean. She even knows when I tell her to cover her eyes its because I dont want her to see something and she does it. So far, so good.


#19

I will send her a copy of my book for free. I hope it will still apply by the time its out of the production stages…

Maybe I need to work on a teenager one as soon as I am done…

What did I get into here? She cant be serious!?!

Lets hope she does not do what my friends mom did in Jr. High. She followed the same thinking but it was about letting her son drink in the house!!!
He was the older brother of a friend of mine and he was allowed to crack one open when he got home from school in the 8th grade. It was okay she thought since “she would rather he do it under her roof where she could see what he was up to”

My dad banned me from going to that house after that revelation.


#20

no not really.
**however I would love a book about how a kid from a big family handles people making comments about his family size. sigh By age 12, my poor boy has really heard it all. A book on how to deal with the attention would be nice. Heck. I might just make one myself. You know in my spare time.:smiley: **


"Timothy and his mom and dad and his 6 brothers and 7 sisters went grocery shopping at Wacko-mart one Saturday afternoon…


**Timothy loved the smell of the bakery section. The old lady giving out cookies behind the counter said to his mom, “Oh my! You must really have her hands full!” **


Timothy turned to see what mom had, but her hands held only a grocery list. He felt so sad for the nice elderly woman. It must be hard to hand out cookies if she’s so old even a piece of paper seems heavy to her.


He said, “Thank you.” as he carefully took the last cookie without touching her delicate hands.


And then we go to the produce section
the meat section
the dairy section
the checkout…
:smiley:


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