Not Protestant Communion


#1

I remeber hearing that we can’t take Protestant Communion. Why? The reason I ask is my Grandmother is almost blind and Methodist and occasionaly asks me to take her to her church (which is at a diffrent time that Mass) and they offer communion every first sunday and while I always politly decline, it got me to wondering. Thanks.


#2

I alway presumed that Protestants and Catholics were worshipping the same Christ, and that the blood and body of Christ was what both were consuming.


#3

[quote=Chris LaRock]I alway presumed that Protestants and Catholics were worshipping the same Christ, and that the blood and body of Christ was what both were consuming.
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ohh, so we can take protestant communion?


#4

No, you can’t take communion at a Protestant church. The understanding about what is going on is very, very different (Chris LaRock is wrong here). As Catholics, we believe that taking communion means (among other things, of course) being in communion: that is, taking communion is a statement of shared belief. If you aren’t Protestant, why would you want to, in essence, state a lie?


#5

[quote=Montie Claunch]I remeber hearing that we can’t take Protestant Communion. Why? The reason I ask is my Grandmother is almost blind and Methodist and occasionaly asks me to take her to her church (which is at a diffrent time that Mass) and they offer communion every first sunday and while I always politly decline, it got me to wondering. Thanks.
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The reason it is called communion is because to receive the Holy Eucharist in the Catholic Church, means that you are in communion with Her. This means that you accept every doctrine that the Catholic Church teaches as the fulness of truth. For you to receive in the methodist church (or any other reformed church) would indicate that you accept all the teachings of the **that **church as the fulness of truth. Most reformed churches teach that the Body and Blood are merely symbolic. Although, if I’m not mistaken, the methodists believe that they are truly receiving Christ’s Body and Blood. However, the sacrament of Holy Orders comes into play here–but that is a subject for another thread.

Peace,
Mickey


#6

[quote=Sherlock]No, you can’t take communion at a Protestant church. The understanding about what is going on is very, very different (Chris LaRock is wrong here). As Catholics, we believe that taking communion means (among other things, of course) being in communion: that is, taking communion is a statement of shared belief. If you aren’t Protestant, why would you want to, in essence, state a lie?
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Many Protestant denomination agree with the Catholic understanding of what happens at communion, only difference being that the word ‘Eucharist’ isn’t used by Protestants.


#7

[quote=Chris LaRock]Many Protestant denomination agree with the Catholic understanding of what happens at communion, only difference being that the word ‘Eucharist’ isn’t used by Protestants.
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It would behoove you to study up on the sacrament of Holy Orders.

Peace,
Mickey


#8

[quote=Montie Claunch]I remeber hearing that we can’t take Protestant Communion. Why? The reason I ask is my Grandmother is almost blind and Methodist and occasionaly asks me to take her to her church (which is at a diffrent time that Mass) and they offer communion every first sunday and while I always politly decline, it got me to wondering. Thanks.
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They do not have a Eucharist. To accept theirs would be to deny the Catholic Church teaching. Please refer to the writings of Paul in Scripture, he warns of taking the body and blood of our Lord improperly. The Eucharist is the central point of the Catholic Church, all else revolves around it, it is the most important Sacrament in Christianity, to partake in non Catholic services would diminish it to a symbolic act.

[quote=CCC]1398 The Eucharist and the unity of Christians. Before the greatness of this mystery St. Augustine exclaims, "O sacrament of devotion! O sign of unity! O bond of charity!"237 The more painful the experience of the divisions in the Church which break the common participation in the table of the Lord, the more urgent are our prayers to the Lord that the time of complete unity among all who believe in him may return.

1399 The Eastern churches that are not in full communion with the Catholic Church celebrate the Eucharist with great love. “These Churches, although separated from us, yet possess true sacraments, above all - by apostolic succession - the priesthood and the Eucharist, whereby they are still joined to us in closest intimacy.” A certain communion in sacris, and so in the Eucharist, "given suitable circumstances and the approval of Church authority, is not merely possible but is encouraged."238

1400 Ecclesial communities derived from the Reformation and separated from the Catholic Church, "have not preserved the proper reality of the Eucharistic mystery in its fullness, especially because of the absence of the sacrament of Holy Orders."239 It is for this reason that, for the Catholic Church, Eucharistic intercommunion with these communities is not possible. However these ecclesial communities, "when they commemorate the Lord’s death and resurrection in the Holy Supper . . . profess that it signifies life in communion with Christ and await his coming in glory."240

1401 When, in the Ordinary’s judgment, a grave necessity arises, Catholic ministers may give the sacraments of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick to other Christians not in full communion with the Catholic Church, who ask for them of their own will, provided they give evidence of holding the Catholic faith regarding these sacraments and possess the required dispositions.241

1411 Only validly ordained priests can preside at the Eucharist and consecrate the bread and the wine so that they become the Body and Blood of the Lord. .
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refer to the Catechism: scborromeo.org/ccc.htm


#9

[quote=Chris LaRock]Many Protestant denomination agree with the Catholic understanding of what happens at communion, only difference being that the word ‘Eucharist’ isn’t used by Protestants.
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Protestant denominations do not have a proper priesthood. Only a properly ordained priest (Catholic [any rite] and Orthodox) can consecrate the bread and wine so that they become the body and blood of Christ–not even High Anglican qualifies.

When a Protestant “priest” says the words of consecration over the bread and wine they remain only bread and wine no matter what he or his denomination thinks happens or doesn’t happen to the bread and wine (or grape juice) because they are not true priests joined to and under the authority of a Catholic bishop.


#10

A Protestant Church may believe it is the Eucharist, but without a Priest present to enact the transubstantiation, it is not.

Belief or not, what they have is anything but the Body and Blood of Christ.


#11

[quote=Mickey]Most reformed churches teach that the Body and Blood are merely symbolic. Although, if I’m not mistaken, the methodists believe that they are truly receiving Christ’s Body and Blood.
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Actually, Methodists believe it is only symolic.


#12

Actually, some Protestant denoms (Anglican comes to mind) do use the word “Eucharist” as I have seen on a sign or two in front of a Protestant church “Eucharist service 8am.”

The issue at hand isn’t a matter of wording at all. It would be silly for anyone to refuse Eucharist to someone entirely based on their terminology. There is a much more substantial and deeper reasoning behind this issue.

Even if you believe that the Eucharist is the body and blood, soul and divinity of Christ, you are still bound by the contraints of professing communion with the church in which you are receiving communion. If you are not in communion with that church or denomination, then your act of communion with them is a gesture in ignorance or, worse, a sacrilege or even heresy.

I once heard an explanation that made very good sense to me. If you are engaged to be married and you believe that your betrothed is the person you are intended to be with forever, there is still a reason why you can not engage in the marital act. It is not because you don’t believe that this person is your life mate. It is not because you doubt that they will be the father or mother of your children. It is not because you have any reservations regarding this person. You can not engage in the marital act of “communion” because you have not yet made that sacramental vow putting you in close martial communion with that other person. You intend to, you believe in it, but it there is still the final obstacle of making that last step which permits you to morally and lawfully engage in that beautiful act of marital communion.

It’s not about wording or exclusion. . .it’s much more about the full sense of communion in which we come to together as believers to profess our common faith and receive the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of our Lord, Jesus Christ.


#13

I always thought it was the theological version of what children do when they build a fort and put up a sign that reads, ‘no girls allowed’.


#14

[quote=Chris LaRock]I always thought it was the theological version of what children do when they build a fort and put up a sign that reads, ‘no girls allowed’.
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Well, you thought wrong, didn’t you. :wink:

The Church isn’t being immature or mean in not allowing us to receive a Protestant communion or Protestants the Catholic Eucharist. It is protecting all of us from receiving unworthily and from making hypocrites of ourselves who declare with our mouths that we believe certain things but then turn around and with our actions (receiving when and where and from whom we shouldn’t) holy communion. It is a very grave matter, not merely one of social acceptance or politeness.


#15

[quote=Chris LaRock]Many Protestant denomination agree with the Catholic understanding of what happens at communion, only difference being that the word ‘Eucharist’ isn’t used by Protestants.
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The difference is what happens at the Mass doesn’t happen at Protestant services. It’s just bread and wine no matter what they understand or believe it to be. At a Catholic Mass, however, the bread and wine actually become really, truly, and substantially, the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ.


#16

[quote=JaneFrances]Actually, some Protestant denoms (Anglican comes to mind) do use the word “Eucharist” as I have seen on a sign or two in front of a Protestant church “Eucharist service 8am.”
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Anglicans may call it Eucharist, but it is not a valid one because their orders are no linger valid. From Leo XIII:

Apostolicae Curae (On the Nullity of Anglican Orders) September 15, 1896 [Bull]


#17

[quote=Aesq]Actually, Methodists believe it is only symolic.
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My mistake. :o


#18

[quote=Mickey]My mistake. :o
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The only reason I know is that I was Methodist and had problems with their conflicting doctrines on communion. Not my problem anymore though, as I am Catholic now. :slight_smile:


#19

Jane, That was a beautiful analogy! Aesq, You are absolutely correct! My son’s best friend when he was about 12 was the Methodist ministers kid and they got into a discussion about the differences in their churches so the kids father and I got the boys together and explained the differences. Turns out that the Methodist minister was Catholic and wanted to marry and be a minister so he converted. His family caused quite a stir in our small town because they often came to mass after their services. The father confided in me how much he missed the Catholic Church and wanted to come back as a married priest. Our little town kinda forced him out of his ministy because he did attend Catholic masses after his services, so last I heard he moved to PA. I know there are a few diocese in PA with married clergy so I am hoping he is there.


#20

Why? Because it’s against canon law. Why is it against canon law (cf. canon 844)? Because it would be an expression of approval or sanction of a false Christianity.


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