Novenas (again)

Hello, I think I am still a little confused on novenas. I remember growing up I heard of (and prayed) a novena to St. Therese of the Little Flower. I don’t have the novena written down anymore, so I went to my friend Google.

I found multiple ones. I thought all novenas were said for 9 days. The first link shows it being said for 5 days. Also, this one sounds familiar, like the one I prayed a long long time ago.

The second link shows a completely different prayer being prayed for 9 days.

So, out of these, is there a more “correct” version to pray?

catholic-forum.com/saints/novena02.htm

ewtn.com/therese/novena.htm

A traditional novena is for nine days (or nine times) since novena menas nine. The practice came from the days between the Ascension and Pentacost when the Apostles with Mary prayed in the upper room. The prayers in the second link is the version we use when we pray a novena to St Terese. The first link is a very traditional prayer to St Terese, not sure why this version only states 5 days, but you could easily keep saying it for nine.

On the second link, the first part has a V. and R. To me that means the priest says the V part and the people respond with the R part. But, if one says this novena at home by themselves, do they say both? Just a little confusing to me.

Yes, if you are saying it alone, you would say both. If we say a novena like that at home, my husband recites the priest’s part since he is the head of our domestic church, and we say the responses. If you want to say a novena like that with a friend or group of friends, one of you would just take the part of the leader (priest) and the others say the responses. Since novenas are private prayers, you can choose to say them how it best fits your circumstances. You don’t have to have a priest to say the leader part.

Thanks for the explanation.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.