Novus-ordo mass VS tridentine mass

Having been born a Catholic and been active in the church since grade shool, I feel awkward asking this question but what is the difference between a novus-ordo mass and a tridentine mass?

Tridentine is the name sometimes given to the latin mass which was said before February 1965.

Novus ordo is the new english mass.

Found this on a Church’s website in Boston…this is about half way into to the discussion about the Tridentine Mass

What is the Tridentine Mass

The Mass

The Mass can be divided into two categories: the “ordinary,” or unchanging part, and the “propers,” which change from week to week. The traditional Roman rite differs from the Novus Ordo in both respects.

The ordinary of the traditional Roman rite includes more invocations of the Trinity, usually in a plaintive and poignant manner. It also refers more to the Blessed Virgin Mary and to the angels and saints (both individually and en masse), both as a reflection of the mediatorial character of grace and as a reminder of the celestial community to which Christians on earth are joined. The ordinary contains more references to the sacrifice of the altar and of the Cross, articulating in both its offertory prayers and in its canon a clear theology of the Eucharist. It also makes copious use of entire psalms or psalm verses at different parts of the Mass to stagger different moods and aspirations, a practice derived from the ancient Church’s love of these poetic prayers. The traditional ordinary contains more Biblical allusions in an attempt to encapsulate the whole of sacred history into a single act of worship. And it tends to be more concrete and erotic in its imagery in an attempt to incorporate both space and time, mind and heart. That concreteness is reflected in the rubrics, which prescribe more physical (yet dignified) gestures for both celebrant and congregation. Finally, nothing in the traditional ordinary is changed unless it is for a reason which ties into the meaning of the liturgical season. (Because the celebrant is acting in the person of Christ, his personality and individual preferences are abstracted from entirely). This economy renders the ordinary a powerful pedagogue of word and gesture. The absence of certain lines during the liturgical year, for example, has a striking effect on the faithful.

One of the most distinctive features of the ordinary of the traditional Roman rite is its exclusive use of its Eucharistic prayer, or canon. Though its origins are obscure, it is generally agreed that the Roman canon was last changed by Pope St. Gregory the Great in the early 600’s. This made it the oldest continually used and least altered canon in Christendom. (In addition to several canons composed within the last thirty-five years, the Novus Ordo includes a modified version of the Roman canon under the title, “Eucharistic Prayer I”).

The “propers” of the traditional Roman rite differ from their modern counterpart most with respect to the Lectionary, or cycle of Scriptural readings. There are three main differences between the two lectionaries. First, the old rite generally has two readings, one from a New Testament epistle and the other from one of the Gospels, while the new rite generally adds a third reading from the Old Testament. Both usages can claim an equally ancient pedigree, though the new rite’s occasional allowance of a non-Scriptural text to act as a third reading is unprecedented in the world of apostolic liturgy. Second, not unlike other historic apostolic rites, the old rite uses a one-year cycle of readings while the new rite uses a three-year cycle. The advantage of the latter is greater exposure to the Scriptures; the advantage of the former is that it serves as an annual “ruler” against which one can measure one’s spiritual progress from year to year. Third, while the readings of the old rite are chosen primarily for their moral or doctrinal relevance to the liturgical calendar, they can also be chosen because of a nearby Saint’s Day or Station Day. The advantage of this development is that it pedagogically illuminates the time of year as well as connects Christian worship to the history of the Church. The new rite, on the hand, keeps its primary emphasis on making sure that a good deal of the Bible gets covered in the three-year cycle, often irrespective of what point in the calendar it is marking. Unifying themes are less important and organic connections to Christian history or hagiolatry virtually non-existent.

[quote=Sir Knight]Having been born a Catholic and been active in the church since grade shool, I feel awkward asking this question but what is the difference between a novus-ordo mass and a tridentine mass?
[/quote]

In summaery, the NOM is based on Ecumenism and community centered which is the new mission of the church since VATII. It requires external laity “participation”.
The TLM is oblivious to ecumenism and is focused on sacrifice and God centered. It is Priest participation and requires only internal laity participation.
I think I’m being fair to both sides here.
Just do a search on:
“NOVUS ORDO”+COMPARISON
in google.
You’ll get about 6,200 hits.
Some compare:
Ordinaries
Propers
Sanctuary furnishing
Rubrics

Have fun.

A lot of sites are polemical toward one or the other.
But you’re a big boy now.

[quote=Sanctus]Found this on a Church’s website in Boston…this is about half way into to the discussion about the Tridentine Mass

What is the Tridentine Mass
[/quote]

From the site’s quote:
The “propers” of the traditional Roman rite differ from their modern counterpart most with respect to the Lectionary, or cycle of Scriptural readings. There are three main differences between the two lectionaries. First, the old rite generally has two readings, one from a New Testament epistle and the other from one of the Gospels, while the new rite generally adds a third reading from the Old Testament.
That is a common error. The TLM normally has 6 readings from Scripture:

  1. Introit
  2. Epistle.
  3. Gradual.
  4. Gospel.
  5. Offertory
  6. Communion
    However, some special occasions alter this. to less
    This is for the 1st Sun. Of Advent.
    For complete examples of the TLM Propers try here

The difference is the number of readings read out loud…2 for TLM, 3 for NOM…NOT the number of readings per se.

[quote=Kielbasi]Tridentine is the name sometimes given to the latin mass which was said before February 1965.

Novus ordo is the new english mass.
[/quote]

What about our mass which is not in english?
Novus Ordo Mass is also celebrated in Latin especially in Rome.

I think it will be better if you say that the novus ordo mass is the mass that you can see in most of the Catholic churches now. where the table is at the center and the priest is already facing the people.:tiphat: Just making some clarification! :slight_smile:

What has been refered to as the Novus Ordo, is the offical Ordo of the Mass found in the Sacramentry and celebrated as the rite of the mass to be celebrated by Roman Catholics. This had its origins from the liturgical reforms which came after Vat II and was accepted as the “ordinary” rite to be celebrated when the revised Sacramentry was accepted as the offical Sacramentry of the Church, I think in 1973. The rite of the Liturgy of the Eucharist is the same through out the Roman Church with the addition of the Vanacular being used instead of Latin, although, Latin being the Offical Language of the Church, may also be used but the order of the Mass as found in the Sacramentry must still be followed.
The Trinitine Mass, was the ordo of the Mass as found in the Sacramentry in use from the Council of Trent until the 1973. With an Indult (special permission from Rome and maybe the Local Bishop - I can’t remember just this minute whose authority is needed) the Trinitine Rite may be used.

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