Nrsv-ce


#1

Anyone here use the NRSV-CE?
I decided to order one ( as its one of the two Scripture versions used in the Catechism).


#2

I have one. It was my first Catholic Bible. It’s actually used in some Catholic resources. However, expect a lot of negative comments regarding its use of inclusive language in ways not approved by the Church (psalms considered to be referring to Jesus, for example), though I think the church in Canada is planning on using it as the basis for their lectionary. There will be some areas where a protestant wording shines through. But it is a good, literal translation, otherwise.


#3

There is no “planning” for it to be used in Canada. It IS in use in Canada, with appropriate modifications. It has full approval/recognitio by the Holy See.


#4

I’ve read then entire NRSV-CE Old Testament and have just started reading the New Testament. Having read the RSV-CE cover to cover 3 times, I did not enjoy the NRSV as much, especially the first two books of the NT thus far.

The archaic language in the DR is something I really don’t enjoy and the NRSV swings too far in the other direction. As an example, the NRSV has Jesus saying, “Listen!” where the RSV says, “Amen I say to you”. Dynamic equivalence is not a bad thing when used correctly but I think it is used a bit too much in the NRSV and in places it does take away from the meaning.

Next I’ll attempt another read of the Knox. I started that once but got frustrated with the lack of quotation marks.

The RSV-CE continues to be my go-to Bible for all occasions. timhollingworth.blogspot.com/2014/01/zippered-thin-line-rsv-ce-bible-from.html

-Tim-


#5

This^^^.


#6

Would you know if there is any plans to release a NRSV-CE with the modifications?

Thanks for the link, I have the Ignatius Compact RSV-CE but the print is far too small for me. Are you familiar with any larger print RSV-CE’s?

Pax


#7

Are you talking about the zippered ones? Do you really have the compact or do you have the thinline? They are exactly the same except that the compact is really, really small while the thinline is a bit larger and may work for you.

My review of the thinline is at timhollingworth.blogspot.com/2014/01/zippered-thin-line-rsv-ce-bible-from.html. This my all time favorite translation, format (no footnotes) and binding. The zippered binding makes it bombproof.

Ignatius/Oxford also jointly publish a large print RSV-CE. See catholicbiblesblog.com/2008/11/new-rsv-ce-large-print.html. This will definitely work and should be a fine Bible if the compact and thinline are any indication. Also see catholicbiblesblog.com/2015/06/info-on-large-print-rsvs.html

In fact, just go search the Catholic Bible’s Blog and search for “RSV-CE large print” and you will get lots of hits. Tim will have all the info you need to make a great decision.

-Tim-


#8

No, as with the case with the NAB, I am guessing its highly unlikely such a modified NRSV will ever be released in Bible form. Shame, as it would have been an excellent version.


#9

I have the thinline. It’s very legible, and I wear reading glasses…I can read it without them.


#10

Yeah I have the compact; and from the pictures I see it is smaller than Oxford’s. I should have bought it from them.
Pax


#11

I’ve only had my NRSV-Ce for a day or so now. I’m not sure what to think of it so far. I like how readable it is but I think it goes a tad too far with inclusive language ( the NABRE does a far better job with it).


#12

Here is a post I did earlier in the year, about the NRSV:
catholicbiblesblog.com/2015/02/oboy-why-i-prefer-nrsv.html


#13

The inclusive language of the NRSV is the deal killer for me. I do have a copy, but I have not spent more dollars that was necessary for a cheap, paperback Canadian Bible Society edition (as opposed to the leather and Ultrasoft I’ve picked for my RSV’s). I stick my nose into the RSV most of the time and use the NRSV only as a supplementary/alternative reference. Again, it’s a shame, because in a lot of places where they use inclusive language, the translation is unfaithful (not all; there are some where the inclusive language is actually more accurate), but other than that, the NRSV is actually a pretty good piece of work.


#14

Nice article. Personally I find myself using the NABRE more and more these days ( I like the idea of using the same translation for study prayer and Liturgy and the NABRE is as close to that as possible).

Yeah, I don’t think I can make it my main translation because of the inclusive language but its still pretty good and from what I’ve been told its become the standard in academic.

Pax


#15

I have the large print version (presbyopia strikes sooner or later). I love it because it was the version in which I memorized most of my scriptures when I sojourned among my separated brethren.


closed #16

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