NSA leaks: Snowden declares 'mission accomplished'


#1

Former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor Edward Snowden, who leaked details of US electronic surveillance programmes, says he's achieved his aim.

"In terms of personal satisfaction, the mission's already accomplished," he told the Washington Post.

"I already won," said Mr Snowden, whose extensive leaks have caused a reassessment of US surveillance policy.

bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-25504334


#2

He is a naive, foolish man.

Sure, they will reassess.

Netenyahu comes out and makes an obligatory “I am disappointed oin you, Mr. President” speech to placate his citizens. Meanwhile, the same people outraged in Israel want Jonathan Pollard released…

Merkel wags her finger at the US government, not for spying as Germany does, but for us getting caught.

As if we didn’t already know, this sort of comment highlights how naive and ignorant Snowden really is and cements why he should never have been cleared to begin with.

The only thing he accomplished was a future tightening of the clearance process to ensure people like him never get cleared. The President will “reassess” and take a look at things, and the scope may draw back a bit, if it did indeed break the law.

There were far more effective and legal ways for him to do something, and he chose not to. So other than throwing his own life away, highlighting the fact he has no integrity, and guaranteeing he is going to die a pauper on the streets of Russia like other former spies (Martin and Miitchell), I don’t know what he thinks he accomplished.


#3

[quote="HappyCatholic01, post:2, topic:349138"]
He is a naive, foolish man.

Sure, they will reassess.

Netenyahu comes out and makes an obligatory "I am disappointed oin you, Mr. President" speech to placate his citizens. Meanwhile, the same people outraged in Israel want Jonathan Pollard released...

Merkel wags her finger at the US government, not for spying as Germany does, but for us getting caught.

As if we didn't already know, this sort of comment highlights how naive and ignorant Snowden really is and cements why he should never have been cleared to begin with.

The only thing he accomplished was a future tightening of the clearance process to ensure people like him never get cleared. The President will "reassess" and take a look at things, and the scope may draw back a bit, if it did indeed break the law.

There were far more effective and legal ways for him to do something, and he chose not to. So other than throwing his own life away, highlighting the fact he has no integrity, and guaranteeing he is going to die a pauper on the streets of Russia like other former spies (Martin and Miitchell), I don't know what he thinks he accomplished.

[/quote]

I find it very unlikely that Snowden didn't anticipate his current and future predicament. Given that he was still willing to blow the whistle, wouldn't this indicate some sort of integrity?


#4

[quote="MacBP, post:3, topic:349138"]
I find it very unlikely that Snowden didn't anticipate his current and future predicament. Given that he was still willing to blow the whistle, wouldn't this indicate some sort of integrity?

[/quote]

Personally, I see no evidence of any plans after he planned on releasing what he did. Had he planned out a future; he wouldn't have been stuck in an airport for weeks; nor now stuck in Russia where he clearly doesn't want to be.


#5

Snowden may have a flawed integrity, but I don’t think he is completely lacking in it. He could be faulted for being self-righteous or moralistic. A favorable interpretation would be that he is principled. Snowden doesn’t seem to have benefited from his revelations or the turmoil they created. Yet, he did violate the trust given to him, so there is fault on his part. But couldn’t the same be said of any whistleblower?

Snowden doesn’t even seem to have made plans for his exit from the US, which makes wonder if his decision wasn’t impulsive. He clearly didn’t believe the US government or his superiors would make reforms based upon his concerns. Did he feel that his safety had been compromised? If so, were his concerns well-founded, or did he panic?

I am not entirely sure what he thinks he accomplished, although he seems content. In the Washington Post article, he offered this explanation:

*“For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission’s already accomplished,” he said. “I already won. As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated. Because, remember, I didn’t want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself.”

“All I wanted was for the public to be able to have a say in how they are governed,” he said. “That is a milestone we left a long time ago. Right now, all we are looking at are stretch goals.”*


#6

[quote=Coatimundi] Quote:

Originally Posted by HappyCatholic01

There were far more effective and legal ways for him to do something, and he chose not to. So other than throwing his own life away, highlighting the fact he has no integrity, and guaranteeing he is going to die a pauper on the streets of Russia like other former spies (Martin and Miitchell), I don’t know what he thinks he accomplished.

Snowden may have a flawed integrity, but I don’t think he is completely lacking in it. He could be faulted for being self-righteous or moralistic. A favorable interpretation would be that he is principled. Snowden doesn’t seem to have benefited from his revelations or the turmoil they created. Yet, he did violate the trust given to him, so there is fault on his part. But couldn’t the same be said of any whistleblower?

Snowden doesn’t even seem to have made plans for his exit from the US, which makes wonder if his decision wasn’t impulsive. He clearly didn’t believe the US government or his superiors would make reforms based upon his concerns.

What does he think he has accomplished? I am not entirely sure. In the Washington Post article, he offered this explanation:

“For me, in terms of personal satisfaction, the mission’s already accomplished,” he said. “I already won. As soon as the journalists were able to work, everything that I had been trying to do was validated. Because, remember, I didn’t want to change society. I wanted to give society a chance to determine if it should change itself.”

“All I wanted was for the public to be able to have a say in how they are governed,” he said. “That is a milestone we left a long time ago. Right now, all we are looking at are stretch goals.”
[/quote]

The problem becomes you can call every turncoat, spy, whistleblower, or traitor “principled” if we are too liberal with the term. What happens to whisleblowers who breach security and then it is found nothing illegal was done? Do they get credit when they take is upon themselves and our wrong?

The very essence of the intelligence community is that it deals in a world that it is unfortunately necessary, and foreign to how average people live their lives. Thus, good guys in any country can be seen as bad guys, especially when limits are stretched. It simply isn’t his place to make the calls he made either way. He had options he chose not to take.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android


#7

America is an increasingly left wing secular state that is now cozying up to Wahhabist extremists. As far as I’m concerned, it has no good guys left in it’s intelligence community, and I’d sure as heck rather see those who illegally spied on the American people brought to justice than Edward Snowden.


#8

And wouldn’t be living like a recluse now severed from his own home.


#9

I don’t see that America is increasingly left wing secular. A correct statement would be that “America is increasingly secular”. I don’t see anything to cheer about on the left or the right wing. Both wings are culpable which makes us all culpable. Prayer is the solution for helping to convert the secular element back to coming to church on Sundays.


#10

Nonsense. I’ll lay odds that Snowden will be living in Brazil by next Christmas. He’ll write a book or sell ugly paintings on Ebay (a la George Zimmerman) and his many fans will make him a millionaire.


#11

I commend Mr. Snowden and truly believe he will go down in the history books as a true patriot. Job well done IMO.

At the same time, I find it very disturbing the US govt and media machine have been able to ‘brainwash’ the amount of americans they have about this and turn them against Snowden, when he was doing it for the people of the US!! LOL

Are people too stupid to recognize he was following the Constitutions requirements concerning a corrupt, power hungry US Govt?

I hope there are many more people like him currently working in our Govt that will eventually blow the whistle on other illegal and immoral things our country is involved in. I truly believe since it was proven the US Govt was doing something illegal here, they are more than likely up to no good in many other instances as well…I have a hard time believing anything our Govt says after Snowdens release of info…how can anyone believe an entity known to lie and be corrupt?


#12

[quote=Irish Cabbie] Quote:

Originally Posted by HappyCatholic01

… guaranteeing he is going to die a pauper on the streets of Russia …

Nonsense. I’ll lay odds that Snowden will be living in Brazil by next Christmas. He’ll write a book or sell ugly paintings on Ebay (a la George Zimmerman) and his many fans will make him a millionaire.
[/quote]

History fot these sort of guys isn’t on your side.

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_and_Mitchell_defection

If Snowden leaves Russian protection, he will be extradited or will have a bullet put in his head.

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android


#13

This is a tiny little man who sought fame by betraying his country. Fortunately, we and the British are quick at building and entirely new system and his importance will fade quickly. Anyone who betrays state secrets to highly suspect nations is no patriot.


#14

Does that work in reverse if Russians betray secrets to other ‘highly suspect’ nations?


#15

Instead of stealing the classified files he just should have quit his job and spoke out at his disgust that the NSA was spying on Americans and private citizens around the world.
One day America is going to capture a russian spy and exchange the spy for Snowden then he will spend many years in a prison.

I agree with him that the government spying on US citizens and private citizens around the world is wrong. His method was wrong and will eventually cost him his freedom.


#16

The problem with that is, no one would have believed him without proof. think about it, if snowden had quit and started speaking out publicly, yet had zero proof, who would believe him? The Govt has successfully brainwashed most of the population that anyone who even questions the US is a terrorist and is dangerous and needs to be in jail. LOL

He did accomplish a great deal, how else would have congress debating the NSA and its methods right now? How else would they have come to the conclusion what the NSA has been doing is illegal? Without the proof Snowden showed, none of this would have happened and the NSA would still be doing this business as usual.

People need to realize the US Govt is one of the PEOPLE, not the other way around. the public owns the govt and has every right to say what they can and cannot do. This is why the US was founded.

the Constitution guarantees our privacy and freedom, but not our safety, this is what most americans fail to understand.


#17

Unfortunately, alot of Americans define patriotism according to one’s loyalty to shady intelligence agencies, instead of loyalty to the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.


#18

“…alot…” [sic]

When I was in high school, I had an elderly English teacher named Mr. Roberts. Mr. Roberts was beloved by his students. Mr. Roberts knew how to teach. He also did a little acting in his day.

One day Mr. Roberts came into our classroom and wrote “ALOT” on the blackboard. Much to the enjoyment of his students, he began to transform from a gentle, grandfatherly-type figure into a raging lunatic. He took off his glasses; he mussed up his hair. He tore open his sweater vest. His face became grossly distorted. His trembling hands gripped his head like he was desperately trying to keep his skull from exploding. With consternation and rage in his voice, he proceeded to scream: "A LOT IS TWO WORDS! A LOT IS TWO WORDS! DEAR GOD ALMIGHTY, PLEASE MAKE THEM STOP! … A LOT IS TWO WORDS! A LOT IS TWO WORDS!!!"

30 years later, I still remember the lesson. I bet everyone else who was lucky enough to watch that performance also remembers that “a lot is two words.”

PS - No hard feelings, Seamus. Feel free to call me a Grammar Nazi if you’d like. I’m sure it was just a typo. Forgive me also for running off on a tangent. I just wanted to give you and others a little gift by sharing this fond memory.

Thank you, Mr. Roberts, wherever you may be.


#19

You hit the nail right on the head…exactly right!

It is very sad these people see themselves as proud americans, but in truth, if the founding fathers saw what they were loyal to, they would have them tried for treason. Sadly, alot of people have this ‘disease’ in todays world, media is partly to blame, many people will believe ANYTHING they are told, as long as its mainstream media, especially when it comes to the US govt.


#20

Snowden is a patriot.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.