Nuns get involved in the battle for the White House


#1

See here: video.foxnews.com/v/1866967451001/

At what price do we endorse Social Justice? Do we pay for it with allowing rampant Abortion on demand? With allowing the loss of Religous Freedoms?


#2

Social justice begins in the womb


#3

Indeed. Why can’t people get that?


#4

Bishop Morlino on World over Live

Raymond Arroyo - Simone campbell, presented herself, was a speaker at 1 party’s convention. As a religious is that an appropriate place for a religious to be, not to be offering prayer, to be offering a partisan statement in the name of the Church or quasi in the name of the church?

Bishop Morlino - Again, I would say this: religious women are technically laity but we don’t look to them to exercise lay mission in the sense that we look to you to do it, or Paul Ryan, because their consecrated life means above all, they want to witness to the holiness of the church and the holiness of the Blessed Mother, that is what their call is. And to engage in a way that would prompt people on the blogosphere to call her a star, for instance, at the demcorat convention, seems far from apprtioate for what we would expect from someone who lives the consecrated life

Bishop Morlino said in a previous interview on World Over live on ‘nuns on the bus’

So, I would think that the religious sisters, though, should concentrate on giving that witness of holiness of all of the wonderful works that they do rather than busing around for political issues. Because, when anything happens like that, if I were to come out in a very political way, I would probably win more followers for the opposition. And, there are many Catholics who feel that very way about the sisters. They really don’t like this. They feel that, their expectation from the sisters is really not this kind of leadership


#5

I’m trying to be very polite and respectful.

TWS: On the legal question, do you think there should be penalties against abortion doctors? I mean, should it be illegal to perform abortions?

CAMPBELL: That’s beyond my pay grade. I don’t know.

“The fact is my vast preference is that all women would have the support to carry their babies to term,” Campbell continued. “One of the things I find so horrifying in the Romney-Ryan budget is that they want to take those supports away. And then they claim they’re pro-life. That just drives me nuts!”

So Campbell knows that the Romney-Ryan budget is “horrifying” because it spends less on social welfare programs than Obama, but she’s agnostic about passing laws to stop abortions. According to one study, striking down Roe v. Wade would lead to 180,000 fewer abortions per year in the United States.

weeklystandard.com/blogs/catholic-nun-dnc-speaker-simone-campbell-abortion-s-beyond-my-pay-grade_651775.html

Ms Campbell - Luckily that has been handled by someone above your pay-grade.

EVANGELIUM VITAE

  1. Abortion and euthanasia are thus crimes which no human law can claim to legitimize. There is no obligation in conscience to obey such laws; instead there is a grave and clear obligation to oppose them by conscientious objection. From the very beginnings of the Church, the apostolic preaching reminded Christians of their duty to obey legitimately constituted public authorities (cf. Rom 13:1-7; 1 Pet 2:13-14), but at the same time it firmly warned that “we must obey God rather than men” (Acts 5:29). In the Old Testament, precisely in regard to threats against life, we find a significant example of resistance to the unjust command of those in authority. After Pharaoh ordered the killing of all newborn males, the Hebrew midwives refused. “They did not do as the king of Egypt commanded them, but let the male children live” (Ex 1:17). But the ultimate reason for their action should be noted: “the midwives feared God” (ibid.). It is precisely from obedience to God-to whom alone is due that fear which is acknowledgment of his absolute sovereignty-that the strength and the courage to resist unjust human laws are born. It is the strength and the courage of those prepared even to be imprisoned or put to the sword, in the certainty that this is what makes for “the endurance and faith of the saints” (Rev 13:10).

In the case of an intrinsically unjust law, such as a law permitting abortion or euthanasia, it is therefore never licit to obey it, or to “take part in a propaganda campaign in favour of such a law, or vote for it”.98

vatican.va/holy_father/jo…-vitae_en.html

cagle.com/author/rick-mckee It isn’t complicated. :frowning:


#6

:thumbsup::thumbsup:


#7

God bless the nuns so the voice for social justice is heard.


#8

[quote="CMatt25, post:7, topic:300391"]
God bless the nuns so the voice for social justice is heard.

[/quote]

Matt, how do you explain the social injustice of abortion which the great sisters support? They do not speak for social justice, as the Holy Fathers have written, they speak of the modern American secular social justice which we need to run from when we hear.

PS. I wanted to ask you earlier, does this mean you are happy there are less people who are "church going people" no matter what the denomination? Or is it simply Catholic numbers? I don't get why this would be a good thing either way. I think we all benefit from the impact of the Church where passing truth through the centuries is concerned, don't you agree?

"With less bodies in the pews to purify, a purer, smaller church has less impact."


#9

This is not my words, I copied it from another thread about the Democratic National convention(the women mentioned are the ones who spoke at the convention-all pro-death), but it fits here and I loved this posters explanation:

"Is it too soon to remind everyone that voting in accordance with such ideas is not something a Catholic should do? The denial of life trumps all other considerations. These women may never utter the word "abortion" but they will advocate both contraception and abortion in order to facilitate their lifestyle.

I know that some persons, under the banner of "Social Justice", will point to programs for the poor offsetting the grave evil that is abortion, and thus state that their vote is for those things, not for abortion, and justify their vote that way. I've seen this before, and I've heard this before.

To any such persons I will always reply that Jesus said WE were obligated to do charity, to help the poor, feed the hungry, cloth the naked, visit the sick and those in prison. He never said we should outsource our personal obligation to the government which will then forcibly extract that "charity" from everyone. It's no longer charity then. Charity only exists in a state of voluntary giving.

Genuine philanthropy is done in person, not through the lens of a telescope. "


#10

[quote="chris138, post:9, topic:300391"]
This is not my words, I copied it from another thread about the Democratic National convention(the women mentioned are the ones who spoke at the convention-all pro-death), but it fits here and I loved this posters explanation:

"Is it too soon to remind everyone that voting in accordance with such ideas is not something a Catholic should do? The denial of life trumps all other considerations. These women may never utter the word "abortion" but they will advocate both contraception and abortion in order to facilitate their lifestyle.

I know that some persons, under the banner of "Social Justice", will point to programs for the poor offsetting the grave evil that is abortion, and thus state that their vote is for those things, not for abortion, and justify their vote that way. I've seen this before, and I've heard this before.

To any such persons I will always reply that Jesus said WE were obligated to do charity, to help the poor, feed the hungry, cloth the naked, visit the sick and those in prison. He never said we should outsource our personal obligation to the government which will then forcibly extract that "charity" from everyone. It's no longer charity then. Charity only exists in a state of voluntary giving.

Genuine philanthropy is done in person, not through the lens of a telescope. "

[/quote]

Oooooo I'm so gonna snag this!

Thank you!:)


#11

The problem is that the nuns have abandon the schoolroom, the poor, and basic religious traditions (the habbit). They need to stop fighting for a social cause.......and focus more on their vocation as a nun.


#12

Agree completely–just not at the expense of the innocent who are murdered in abortion.
Do you agree with my statement?


#13

[quote="Lapey, post:8, topic:300391"]
Matt, how do you explain the social injustice of abortion which the great sisters support? They do not speak for social justice, as the Holy Fathers have written, they speak of the modern American secular social justice which we need to run from when we hear.

PS. I wanted to ask you earlier, does this mean you are happy there are less people who are "church going people" no matter what the denomination? Or is it simply Catholic numbers? I don't get why this would be a good thing either way. I think we all benefit from the impact of the Church where passing truth through the centuries is concerned, don't you agree?

"With less bodies in the pews to purify, a purer, smaller church has less impact."

[/quote]

I know the good Sister Simone said something about her pedigree. But I'm not as prepared to say as you are that the sisters support abortion.

Does what mean? Oh I think maybe you mean my signature. No. It primarily means Catholic numbers since it is your church that claims to be the one and only true one. And I've heard folks in it wouldn't mind purer even if it meant smaller. But good point. I agree if people, no matter the denomination, receive benefit by attending those, that's a good thing too.


#14

[quote="Battle_Warrior, post:11, topic:300391"]
The problem is that the nuns have abandon the schoolroom, the poor, and basic religious traditions (the habbit). They need to stop fighting for a social cause.......and focus more on their vocation as a nun.

[/quote]

I am confused by your comment. Would you mind elaborating?

I was fortunate enough to have been taught by Benedictine nuns. They were mostly in their 40 s and 50's at that time, although to a little kid like me, they all seemed ANCIENT. This weekend our class is celebrating its 40th anniversary of 8th grade graduation. Sadly, none of our nuns are alive to enjoy it with us. Hopefully, they have their reward in heaven.

For my first six grades, all the nuns wore a full habit. Then in 7th grade they modified it a little, they kept the head covering, but started to wear skirts below the knee. Who knew they had legs? ;) The following year a few of the younger nuns just started wearing conservative clothes, but no head covering. Who knew they had hair? :shrug:


#15

[quote="fastenatingguy, post:12, topic:300391"]
Agree completely--just not at the expense of the innocent who are murdered in abortion.
Do you agree with my statement?

[/quote]

No I don't quite agree I guess because I don't personally believe it has to be an either/or, or one more important than the other situation. I fully understand though how as a Catholic you believe it is. Just speaking for me personally though, when I read in Matt 25 about the social justice issues, I see the sick, the homeless, the hungry, the thirsty, the naked, the prisoner mentioned. And about how caring about those is righteous and those who do, can obtain eternal life. Also in the United States of America I don't think it is considered murder when a woman legally chooses an abortion.


#16

[quote="_Abyssinia, post:2, topic:300391"]
Social justice begins in the womb

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:


#17

[quote="CMatt25, post:15, topic:300391"]
No I don't quite agree I guess because I don't personally believe it has to be an either/or, or one more important than the other situation. I fully understand though how as a Catholic you believe it is. Just speaking for me personally though, when I read in Matt 25 about the social justice issues, I see the sick, the homeless, the hungry, the thirsty, the naked, the prisoner mentioned. And about how caring about those is righteous and those who do, can obtain eternal life. Also in the United States of America I don't think it is considered murder when a woman legally chooses an abortion.

[/quote]

Why can't it be BOTH support for social justice AND support for life in all instances?:confused:

Aren't both virtues and teachings of Christianity?


#18

What a truism! Social justice begins in the womb … how can you truly refute that statement? Excellent choice of words, Abyssinia!


#19

Justice without justice for the unborn is a mockery, a clanging cymbal…


#20

So then why don't these women put their whole "social justice" thing to work and actually try and reduce abortions. Pray at clinics. Volunteer at birthright or project rachel. Hand out flyers promoting adoption. OR if you want to get political, make the courts protect the unborn through protest and pass laws to help pregnant women.

Seriously, these women are so misguided.


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