NYC morgues near capacity

I have no words.

Pray for the dead, pray that this pandemic end.

Lord help us. :pray:

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Yikes, working at a hospital dedicated to only treating COVID patients will be hard place to be.

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I was thinking about this earlier; to have a loved one die and not be able to have the funeral must be especially challenging for the emotions of the survivors. While not gathering together the loved ones of the person that passed is good sense, it also feels disrespectful in some deep sense.

Not that my thoughts on this were purely abstract. I’ve got family that unfortunately doesn’t take this seriously and are members of higher risk groups. I’m a bit surprised at how much information on the current state of things hasn’t penetrated their world view. It was only yesterday that I was explaining to one of them that an infected person can be asymptomatic.

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In Italy the military just take the body away and no funeral is allowed in the worst hit areas, a state supplied coffin is used and they are buried by the military or cremated. Ireland has moved to only allowing a maximum of 10 people at a funeral and a few have been closed down by police recently where people tried to have a large amount of grieving relatives present. Crematoriums in London now have bouncers on the doors and if you exceed the limit allowed in of people they will eject the excess individuals and you may be reported to the police. As a bit of black humour it will cut down on the ever increasing costs of funerals mind you as funeral directors are now apparently beginning to fight it out to get your custom. On the other side of that coin the most people will be able to do is basic funerals so they are complaining about lack of earnings. I don’t have a huge degree of sympathy as funeral directors charge quite ludicrous prices in London as in many other places and insist on telling relatives stuff that isn’t true. Such as they must use coffins sourced by them and that they are required to use a funeral director. Neither of which is true in the UK.

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Does anyone know how they handled burials during the Spanish flu?

During the Middle Ages they had mass burials and burnings but I’m pretty sure we can handle it better now!

It is worse. People brought to the hospital in serious condition as separated from family. The family is kept away and they die alone. And then there is no viewing, funeral service, or wake.

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It’s true. No visits from family at the hospital, no wake, no funeral, just the burial and that after waiting days.

Lord have mercy.

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I can show you several articles on this detailing the Italian experience. Family are not allowed to see the deceased and their only involvement is essentially being able to select a coffin of their choice.

If, God forbid a family member of my own goes during this I’ll instruct the funeral director to go with direct cremation and return the ashes for burial. That’s my own wish for myself but it is not for other family members who have particular wishes but if it happened during this I wouldn’t be able to accommodate them and I’ve save the cash and use it elsewhere as the traditional large Irish funeral would not be possible.

My great-aunt died in Ireland, she was nearly 95 and in slowly declining health and it wasn’t due to coronavirus. But she was allowed her immediate family and their was a police presence at the cemetery to make sure that was adhered to. When it got to more than ten people in the cemetery the police barred anyone else entering. Lots of shouting apparently but they were adamant about it. They are talking about making it no more than two or three people including the minister or priest in future. I want no-one at mine so no problem but that is not an option likely to appeal to many. I’d go the Bowie route, direct cremation, no viewing, I consider much of the pomp around funerals a waste of money and time. But for others it offers closure and has cultural significance.

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I just had this conversation with my sister regarding our mother. Neither of us live near our father’s resting place, and probably won’t be able to travel to it during this crisis. Our mother has Alzheimer’s and lives in a nursing home.

Even if she doesn’t contract coronavirus, it wouldn’t be possible to have a funeral or wake now.

I hope she lives at least until I can visit her again.

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Early on in this crisis we were able to swab people who died at home, and thus got a coronavirus reading. But those days are long gone. We simply don’t have the testing capacity for the large numbers dying at home. 6/

Sounds extremely lazy, not to take a sample that could be tested later.

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