Obama commutes sentences for 214 federal prisoners


#1

foxnews.com/politics/2016/08/03/obama-commutes-sentences-for-214-federal-prisoners.html


#2

From the article:

“We are not done yet,” Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates said. “We expect that many more men and women will be given a second chance through the clemency initiative.”

A second chance…at what?


#3

For some of them, likely at not getting caught this time 'round. :rolleyes:


#4

Selling cocaine and crystal meth, apparently. Maybe this time they can be better at it. :confused:

–Jen


#5

I applaud President Obama for his compassion. Federal sentences are often entirely too harsh. The president should be commuting some of these sentences. I hope and pray that Tim Tyler will has his life sentence commuted before President Obama leaves office in January of next year. Please see:

famm.org/timothy-tyler/


#6

Well prohibition on alcohol didnt work too well, why would they think a drug prohibition would be any different? LOL

At least when it came to alcohol laws, they were quick to recognize it was a failure, they continue the ‘prohibition’ on drugs solely because it brings in millions of dollars to law enforcement and private prison industry, these types of sentences SHOULD be commuted imo.


#7

Agreed. I would guess the “millions” is more likely billions.


#8

Be careful. Would anyone here think that tax evasion should land you in the harshest prison of the day? Many Many Many times the drug conviction is crime that is not pleaded away as rape is difficult to prove. Most criminals doing time for drug trafficking are doing that time because it is more difficult to get convictions on their other crimes. It would be wrong to assume most of them were not arrested in an aggravated setting.

Yes, we should pray and visit them, and for those are innocent or received an unjust sentence we pray for them and their release. I doubt those are the people Obama has been releasing at least that hasn’t been the case when he orchestrates the release of illegal aliens who have committed murderers and rape.


#9

I see you have a joint of marijuana, that’ll be three years minimum.


#10

#11

any sources for the claim welfare has increased in Colorado?


#12

Really??? :confused:

I live in Colorado, and have lived here for 44 years. This is news to me. Got any sources to back up your claim?
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#13

I wonder how many police and victims feel disillusioned with these announcements?


#14

Not I. The ones that were prioritized for clemency seem to be the ones that I would pick.


#15

#16

#17

It is not possible for any of us here on CAF to know whether these peoples’ penalties were justified by the facts or not. They might have pleaded guilty. They might have “plea bargained” down from greater offenses carrying greater penalties. They might have been found guilty by juries. They might have been on parole when they committed their offenses. They might have committed other crimes in the past.

Stories as told by them or their attorneys cannot be relied upon by the casual observer. It would take a lot of information to know the reality.

But one thing we should consider is whether these commutations are being done because of a real balancing of the evidence in order to do justice under the law, or whether they’re being done out of ideological or even political motivations despite the law.


#18

Of course, mikekle. I do know that. :slight_smile:
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#19

Your last paragraph contradicts your first two paragraphs. On one hand you say (correctly, I think) that we on CAF cannot know enough details of the specific prisoners to judge if commuting their sentence is proper or not. On the other hand you say we (I assume you mean us on CAF) should consider whether these commutations are appropriate, or are done out of misplaced ideological or political motives. Well, how are we supposed to do that without the very knowledge of the cases that you say we are lacking?


#20

I’m glad he is doing this. Hasn’t it become clear that The War on Drugs has caused more harm than the drugs themselves?

Perhaps legalization of all drugs isn’t the answer, but criminalizing a health issue isn’t either.


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