Obamacare now more popular than ever: NBC News/WSJ Poll


#1

A new poll says Obamacare is more popular than ever before.


#2

And HRC will win the election by a landslide


#3

More fake news. Contrast the current headlines. Obamacare at 45% “more popular than ever”. Trump at 45% “Trump least popular ever”. People have caught on to this, which is why Trump won. The media sold their reputation of a Obama sized mess of pottage.


#4

That’s right. Trump is taking office with an historically low approval rating. Obamacare is more popular than at any time in the past. But if you don’t like the message, just shoot the messenger, right? One only needs to look at how long the list of “discredited” news outlets is to realize that maybe they aren’t all that discredited after all.


#5

It’s two different measures.

Obamacare at 45% is the highest approval rating ever when compared with it’s own popularity in the past.

Trump at 45% is the lowest approval rating compared with other new presidents.


#6

That question posed by NBC/WSJ seems amateurish. Couldn’t there be people who think the ACA is a good idea but still don’t like the reality, the outcome? I don’t know but why not just ask opinion on repeal?

According to The Hill, a GS Strategy Group, “found that 54 percent of likely voters say they would like to see the president’s signature legislative achievement undergo full repeal or major changes.” Also, “Support for repeal spikes to 70 percent when voters are told that there would be a transition period that allows consumers to keep their current coverage while a new law is implemented.” “That scenario is even supported by a plurality of Democrats in the poll, of 48 percent to 43 percent.”

According to a Quinnipiac University poll on Hot Air, this poll found 18% support full repeal, 47% partial repeal, 31% no repeal. So far more support some or all repeal, compared to the percentage that do not want a repeal.


#7

I’d be interested in knowing what how that breaks down into what they desire for a replacement plan. For example, what percentage want single payer as opposed to options which are “smaller” than the ACA?

For example, in May 2016, 51% favored a full repeal, but the same polling group also favored replacing it with a single payer program at 58%.

gallup.com/poll/191504/majority-support-idea-fed-funded-healthcare-system.aspx


#8

Polls are reliable indicators of opinion the time of polling, within the margin of error.
The polls before the election also had to model turnout - and neccessarily involved trends over time: Overall, the polling is accurate. that why people hire polling firms.

Polls may give results that you do not like, but that doesn’t make them unreliable.


#9

Furthermore, polling trends indicated a closing of the gap as election day occurred. It was also only a very small percentage different in a few states (PA, MI, WI, for example) that made the difference in the EC. In predicting elections, you have to go by state polls, not national trends (Clinton won pop vote by 2%, which is in line with national polls close to the election). How various news agencies spun it is different than polling data being rigged. This election also had a large number of undecideds, and to be frank a number of people resigned to voting for him who also had a very negative opinion of him and who may have wished to keep their voting preferences private. Regardless of the latter assertion, the large number of undecideds in polls is a factor, and it doesn’t mean polling or statistics were rigged or incredibly biased (taken as an aggregate).


#10

Because that is a much more complicated question. Everyone understands the simple question : Was Obamacare a** good idea or a bad idea**. They asked to choose between how things were before Obamacare and how things are with Obamacare. That is at least a clear question.

According to The Hill, a GS Strategy Group, “found that 54 percent of likely voters say they would like to see the president’s signature legislative achievement undergo full repeal or major changes.”

There are probably many people who are in the 54 percent cited above - people who would like to see Obamacare undergo major changes - and who also would have answered the OP poll saying that on balance Obamacare has been a** good idea**. So the two polls do not contradict each other. They describe different things.

Also, “Support for repeal spikes to 70 percent when voters are told that there would be a transition period that allows consumers to keep their current coverage while a new law is implemented.” “That scenario is even supported by a plurality of Democrats in the poll, of 48 percent to 43 percent.”

Also not in conflict with the results of the OP poll.

According to a Quinnipiac University poll on Hot Air, this poll found 18% support full repeal, 47% partial repeal, 31% no repeal. So far more support some or all repeal, compared to the percentage that do not want a repeal.

Even Obama invited opponents to propose changes to the law. This is not surprising.


#11

I wonder if discrediting of polling is part of a larger agenda to discredit independent media, science, education. When we reach epistemological chaos, the Leader is positioned to say: I ALONE …


#12

If 100 different sources look at a topic, and 80 of them come to a similar conclusion, that’s a strong indication it is true, right?

The problem is, we don’t have **different **sources. A few corporations directly control the vast majority of influential media, and strongly influence most of what they don’t own. When I travel, I find the daily newspaper is almost a clone of my hometown paper, the local TV news stations are now almost identical to each other, and to the overall priorities of the networks.

This is a totally different situation than 50 years ago, when the local newspapers and broadcast coverage was far more diverse, when ABC would differ from CBS News, when journalism emphasized objective coverage. Today is the world of Advocacy Journalism. A very few outlets push the Right, but the “Long List” you refer to pushes the Left, often with identical wording.

1960 media: 10% Right, 10% Left, 80% mainstream; tens of thousands of people powerful in media, mostly are not connected to each other;

2017 media: most of the former mainstream melted into Left; hundreds of people powerful in media, and most of them are connected to each other;

If 10 reporters write exactly the same article, with the same bias and even the same wording, that does not count as 10 sources, or any kind of long list. The people who read those formerly mainstream, now Left media sources, will report results to polls that reflect the power of Time Warner, and a very few other giant corporations.


#13

When people face the prospect of actually losing something, they suddenly appreciate its value. Fortunately for them, the GOP still has no concrete plan for repealing and replacing Obamacare, and it looks like their current plan is to keep Obamacare in place for a few years.


#14

Here’s how it affects Georgians:

myajc.com/news/individual-insurance-rates-spiking-double-digits-georgia/3nQfXaE7zZccKSrK9vXMiK/


#15

The popularity is probably higher among those who would lose their insurance without it.


#16

Imagine the polling when millions of people actually lose their coverage.


#17

If repeal is your ultimate goal, then these polls are meaningful. But if the main issue is one of premiums people pay, then another approach is warranted.


#18

:thumbsup:

I think if Obamacare was so popular Hillary would be the one being sworn in on Friday.

Trump promising to repeal Obamacare was one of his strong points for winning.


#19

my 2016 plan was dropped and we had to get another plan for me for 2017, from a different company AND one that was accepted by the doctors I visit. It isn’t that many, but two I visit once a year - eye doctor being one). We had so much trouble understanding the healthcare.gov website and its stupid people get penalized if they DON’T have health insurance!

so, who did they poll? they didn’t ask me!


#20

What? I don’t understand the last sentence. No, it’s just that we crave sound bites because we don’t have time for anything else but sound bites on Facebook, and then end up with a pile of bureaucracy that doesn’t make any sense . #Obamacare

Was this a poll done with people who actually haven’t had to use their obamacare for large doctor bills yet? Because that’s most people.

#fakenews
#reallife


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