Off the menu: Animal welfare in China

An attempt to persuade the Congress to ban the eating of dog- and cat-meat has captivated the Chinese press and caused an uproar.

A proposed animal-rights law, circulated in draft last September by Chinese activists and legal experts, would be the first of its kind in a country where animal welfare rarely seems a priority. Pigs destined for slaughter are often seen crammed excruciatingly tightly in cages on the backs of lorries. In safari parks visitors happily pay to dangle live chickens into lions’ dens, or even to have a live calf dragged by its legs behind a jeep past ravenous tigers. But a fast-growing middle class, despite enjoying gory outings, is also fond of pet dogs and cats.

economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15580840

Its been said that people don't eat species once they become common as pets. But could this mean better treatment of other animals in China, too?

[quote="Dale_M, post:1, topic:190081"]
economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15580840

Its been said that people don't eat species once they become common as pets. But could this mean better treatment of other animals in China, too?

[/quote]

:thumbsup::thumbsup:

Hopefully

[quote="Dale_M, post:1, topic:190081"]
economist.com/world/asia/displaystory.cfm?story_id=15580840

Its been said that people don't eat species once they become common as pets. But could this mean better treatment of other animals in China, too?

[/quote]

Gee. Does this mean people will have to become pets before they treat people decently there?

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