Ok to take pictures?

My 5th grade daughter will be an altar server for the first time next weekend. Is it OK for me to take pictures of this? I see people taking pictures during baptisms, weddings, etc. I could turn off the flash, if that would be best. Thanks

I would ask first. Different priests have different feelings about this.

A few years ago, I was asked to take some pictures during Mass by my kids’ school. I asked the priest and he had no problem with it. However, I did not want to be a distraction, so I turned off the flash and simply took pictures from my pew. There were a few pictures that weren’t too bad, but without a flash…

Our current pastor does not allow picture taking during First Communion and the like. There is a professional photographer hired, and he is the only one taking pictures.

Definitely, though, try to get a few pictures to mark the occassion - maybe before Mass when she is dressed in whatever altar servers dress in at your parish. Or after Mass as she puts out the candles (or whatever). A picture with her and the priest before Mass.

I would strongly recommend against it. With all due respect, the Mass is not a photo-op event. While there are events, such as wedding Masses and Baptisms (and Papal Masses) where photographs can be (and are) taken, a regular Sunday Mass needs to be respected. Your daughter is engaging in something sacred. While I realize that your enthusiasm regarding the matter, it is better to treat what she is doing as something important, dignified and solemn. Photography also can cause distractions and detract from why we are at Mass in the first place.

You could take a picture of her after Mass with the celebrant to mark the occasion, just not during Mass.

Yes, turn off the flash and don’t do anything that might disrupt the Mass, like standing up or stepping out into the aisle. Take a few quick pictures and then put the camera away. You can ask to take pictures with the priest in front of the altar after Mass.

I don’t have a problem with the professional photographer idea as long as the pictures are made available to all parents free of charge or very inexpensively. I don’t like the idea of saying to parents if you want a picture of your child’s First Communion the packages start at $45!

ask your pastor. In this diocese it is banned unless it is the Mass being taped for later broadcast on their TV station, or professional photographers at weddings–who operate under strict parameters. Yes many people break the rule before the ushers can stop them, but that does not make it okay to turn the Mass into a private entertainment. Ask Father to pose with the servers for a picture before or after Mass.

also new servers can be nervous, and knowing you will be taking pictures might make her more so, and it might distract the other children who are serving as well.

for the record, parents have a chance to get posed 1st communion pictures from a local photographer who visits after their retreat, their option, parish makes no profit. No photographers, professional or amateur, are allowed during Mass, which is the regular Sunday Mass, nor during the school Mass which is a separate event. Father does willingly pose for pictures, group and individual, after Mass (as does the bishop after Confirmation).

Ask Father if it is OK. Definitely no flash and stay in your seat.
In general it is frowned upon. Mass is the highest form of prayer that we have and it’s dignity goes beyond earthly things like photo-ops. You can take pictures before and after to commemorate the day.

I was going to say, why not video record it instead (with permission, of course) There are lots of youtube Masses these days, if you wish to put it there.

\I would strongly recommend against it. With all due respect, the Mass is not a photo-op event. While there are events, such as wedding Masses and Baptisms (and Papal Masses) where photographs can be (and are) taken, a regular Sunday Mass needs to be respected. Your daughter is engaging in something sacred. While I realize that your enthusiasm regarding the matter, it is better to treat what she is doing as something important, dignified and solemn.\

As opposed to non-solemn occasions such as wedding Masses, Baptisms, and Papal Masses, which are not sacred, right? :smiley: :wink:

My personal opinion is that the strict “no pictures” policy is really in place for other reasons, usually to prevent documentation of things being done or not done per the GIRM. We are not talking about 65 people all trying to take pictures like during First Holy Communion. We are talking about ONE parent who can quickly take one or two pictures (no flash) during the Preparation of the Gifts, or some other time other than the Consecration. Best done while everyone else is also standing, and no one will notice. The Professional Photos are in one way or another a money making deal, unless as I said each family get one picture of each child free of charge.

same rules apply and there are also probably rules in your diocese about taping a Mass and broadcasting it elsewhere. in this parish an usher will politely ask you to put the camcorder away or take it from you

I also recommend against it because of the reasons that you cited. The Mass is not a photo-op event.

I too agree with the Ask first responces.
I know more than a few times I have lost my consentration while celerbrating mass and other rites by a camera in my face or a bright flash in my eyes. I just smile and find my place in the rite and carry on. I have even see priests totally loose it a few times. one even tossed holy water at a lady snapping pictures. I think it’s on youtube.
a lot of priests seen to forget the rule to always be patient and humble. we are here to serve the people.

Hmmm…something tells me that might not go over too well. :rolleyes:

I would think that might disrupt the Mass much more than a few pictures. When I have taken pictures (like when visiting the Eastern Churches), it was quick, no flash, not during the Consecration, and most important, practically no one knew I had taken any pictures. Then it was back to consentrating on the Liturgy.

Your not taking pictures reminds your daughter that this is a service she is doing, it is not like a dance recital or a birthday party (those are all about HER) - the spirit of humility is very important for servers.

The Holy Mass is not a performance. There really is no reason to have a photo of your child serving. You know they are there, God knows they are there, what else really matters?

Keep the cameras for the soccer game or whatnot - Mass is not the place for cameras, unless you have a designated parish photographer who is approved by your priest to be there, there is no need for parents snapping photos.

~Liza

:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:

Take a few pictures (no flash) its is part of her life as a young Catholic. I would suggest not telling your child so she doesn’t worry about it but make sure to get a few close smiling pictures after mass. Unless you jump up and say HONEY LOOK AT MOM SMILE!!! no one will notice. I don’t really even think you have to ask, if all you want are a few quick pics from your seat. :smiley:

I’m sorry folks - call me the wet blanket - but what ever happened to paying attention and worshiping God at Mass? The Creator of the Universe is on the altar, and folks are worried about snapping photos??!!!

Wow.

~Liza

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