OkCupid's CEO Donated to an Anti-Gay Campaign Once, Too


#1

Mother Jones:

OkCupid’s CEO Donated to an Anti-Gay Campaign Once, Too

Last week, the online dating site OkCupid switched up its homepage for Mozilla Firefox users.Upon opening the site, a message appeared encouraging members to curb their use of Firefox because the company’s new CEO, Brendan Eich, allegedly opposes equality for gay couples—specifically, he donated $1000 to the campaign for the anti-gay Proposition 8 in 2008. “We’ve devoted the last ten years to bringing people—all people—together,” the message read. “If individuals like Mr. Eich had their way, then roughly 8% of the relationships we’ve worked so hard to bring about would be illegal.” The company’s action went viral, and within a few days, Eich had resigned as CEO of Mozilla only weeks after taking up the post. On Thursday, OkCupid released a statement saying “We are pleased that OkCupid’s boycott has brought tremendous awareness to the critical matter of equal rights for all individuals and partnerships.”

But there’s a hitch: OkCupid’s co-founder and CEO Sam Yagan once donated to an anti-gay candidate. (Yagan is also CEO of Match.com.) Specifically, Yagan donated $500 to Rep. Chris Cannon (R-Utah) in 2004, reports Uncrunched. During his time as congressman from 1997 to 2009, Cannon voted for a constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriage, against a ban on sexual-orientation based job discrimination, and for prohibition of gay adoptions.

He’s also voted for numerous anti-choice measures, earning a 0 percent rating from NARAL Pro Choice America. Among other measures, Cannon voted for laws prohibiting government from denying funds to medical facilities that withhold abortion information, stopping minors from crossing state lines to obtain an abortion, and banning family planning funding in US aid abroad. Cannon also earned a 7 percent rating from the ACLU for his poor civil rights voting record: He voted to amend FISA to allow warrant-less electronic surveillance, to allow NSA intelligence gathering without civil oversight, and to reauthorize the PATRIOT act.

So no that everyone’s political contributions can be searched online it’s going to be a big game of Gotcha!

I’m sure Yagan had some reason for backing Cannon that had nothing to do with his “aini-gay” and pro-choice views – maybe he had a perfect score for helping the tech industry.
Will he be saved by the fact that he got on board with the gay rights crew later? stay tuned.


#2

He addressed this in a statement:

“A decade ago, I made a contribution to Representative Chris Cannon because he was the ranking Republican on the House subcommittee that oversaw the Internet and Intellectual Property, matters important to my business and our industry. I accept responsibility for not knowing where he stood on gay rights in particular; I unequivocally support marriage equality and I would not make that contribution again today. However, a contribution made to a candidate with views on hundreds of issues has no equivalence to a contribution supporting Prop. 8, a single issue that has no purpose other than to affirmatively prohibit gay marriage, which I believe is a basic civil right.”

It’s also disingenuous to compare supporting a candidate to supporting Prop 8. That’d be like saying if you voted for Obama in 2008 you were anti-gay marriage.


#3

Eich supported True Marriage in 2008, Obama supported True Marriage in 2008. Eich stepped down.


#4

A belief and an action.

Eich used his money to back something which, if I understand correctly, was later deemed unconstitutional. An action.

Obama simply believed something, later recanted that belief, and the only actions he’s taken in regards to that is refusing to defend DOMA.

Comparing a belief to a financial action is a faulty comparison.


#5

But Obama did his refusal to defend DOMA after 2008.

So, what are you saying? That Mr. Eich does not have a right to his political views?

A belief is more than likely to kill others than a financial action.


#6

Let’s not forget, the Classic Example is the Constitution allowed Slavery, whether something is ruled Constitutional or Not is shown not to be a true measure through history.

Let’s not forget, 30+ States have true marriage, 15 have redefined it.


Oh well, at the least, this should rule out Hillary as a viable candidate, she was pro-traditional marriage as well.


#7

What am I saying?

I’m saying that comparing a belief to a financial action is a faulty comparison. There’s a difference between thinking (whatever) and not acting upon it, and thinking (whatever) and finacially supporting legistation that will further that belief.

As for slavery, I went and checked and it’s unconsitutional due to the 13th amendment. I don’t see how this is counter to anything I’ve said really, or how it relates to this topic.


#8

Slavery, you have heard of the Civil War have you not? 214,000 soldiers killed. You surely did not believe some Federal Court ruled on that?

Well Obama and Hillary both supported Traditional Marriage in 2008, the same year Mr. Eich did.

Now, Obama came out and Hillary as well, as Candidates, stating their policy would be against redefining marriage. So your comparison seems faulty, policy, what a Political Candidate stands for and a proposition seem alike.


#9

The Coalition of African American Pastors have come out against Obama because in fact, Obama came out for the redefining of Marriage.

caapus.org/

So in fact, it seems very real that once Obama came out in support of gay marriage, he lost support. So, don’t tell me something like saying “That’d be like saying if you voted for Obama in 2008 you were anti-gay marriage” because in fact, that is highly possible.


#10

I’ll take this as a no, you don’t see how it’s relevant to this topic either. I guess we’ll drop it here seeing as though it doesn’t relate to anything.

Well Obama and Hillary both supported Traditional Marriage in 2008, the same year Mr. Eich did.

Now, Obama came out and Hillary as well, as Candidates, stating their policy would be against redefining marriage. So your comparison seems faulty, policy, what a Political Candidate stands for and a proposition seem alike.

See above about the difference in actions and beliefs. Especially my first post on the matter where it goes over the difference between supporting a candidate with hundreds of views, and supporting a single issue.


#11

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