"Old Catholicism", Anglo-Catholicism, etc.


#1

I was wondering, after reading a thread on the SSPX, are similiar efforts being made to bring other splinter groups such as these into full communion with Rome?


#2

Yes, I believe there are many different efforts underway.

As far as priorities go, I think the Church is concentrating first on those whose departures happened most recently (SSPX, etc.). These efforts would probably be presented with the fewest obstacles; as generations go by, the schisms grow deeper.

I know there is also ongoing dialoque with the Polish National Catholic Church (PNCC), which at least at some point in its history was affiliated with the “Old Catholics”.


#3

To my knowlege the Anglo-Catholics in America are people who removed themselves from the Protestant Episcopal church in the USA. But when the Episcopal church started modernizing these folks held a more traditional view. They separated themselves from the mainstream Episcopalians. As I am told by my mother in law (who is an Anglo-Catholic) they do not believe that the Pope is the head of the Church on earth. He is just another bishop among bishops. Also their priests marry. But only males can be priests. They use the Book of Common Prayer 1928 version if you want to see what their liturgy is like. In their church they call themselves North American Anglicans. There are several groups of Anglican churches, not a united group.
I know that some branches are dialoging with Catholics to come to some accord.
I studied this path along with Catholicism when my husband and I were thinking of converting. He was a cradle Episcopalian and we attended the Episcopal church at that time.
We chose the Catholic Church. Or rather the Holy Spirit chose it for us and we went along.


#4

As far as Anglicans go-

I know that efforts have been made with the Traditional Anglican Communion (TAC) to reunite with Rome. Although there has been a lot of dialogue and progress, what will eventually happen has yet to be seen. I’m not sure of any of the other Anglican groups and if they’ve been involved in discussions with Rome.

The Anglican Communion has been in discussions for quite a few decades now, but I don’t think any real changes will happen anytime soon (sadly).


#5

[quote=slyboots]To my knowlege the Anglo-Catholics in America are people who removed themselves from the Protestant Episcopal church in the USA. But when the Episcopal church started modernizing these folks held a more traditional view. They separated themselves from the mainstream Episcopalians. As I am told by my mother in law (who is an Anglo-Catholic) they do not believe that the Pope is the head of the Church on earth. He is just another bishop among bishops. Also their priests marry. But only males can be priests. They use the Book of Common Prayer 1928 version if you want to see what their liturgy is like. In their church they call themselves North American Anglicans. There are several groups of Anglican churches, not a united group.
I know that some branches are dialoging with Catholics to come to some accord.
I studied this path along with Catholicism when my husband and I were thinking of converting. He was a cradle Episcopalian and we attended the Episcopal church at that time.
We chose the Catholic Church. Or rather the Holy Spirit chose it for us and we went along.
[/quote]

Anglo-Catholicism is a variety of Anglicanism that traces its formal roots to the Oxford Movement /Tractarians in the 1830s, and the Ritualist Movement in the Church of England about 40 years later. They are Anglicans who are very Catholic in doctrine, as opposed to those on the Evangelical side of Anglicanism.

What you are describing above, those Anglicans who separated from the official Worldwide Anglican Communion (the 38 national Anglican Churchs formally in communion with the Archbishop of Canterbury) recently, are known as Traditional Anglicans or Continuing Anglicans. True, many Continuing Anglicans are also Anglo-Catholics, but then so are many Anglicans who are still in the official Anglican Communion. Me, I’m both a Continuing Anglican and an Anglo-Catholic.

GKC


#6

[quote=GKC]Anglo-Catholicism is a variety of Anglicanism that traces its formal roots to the Oxford Movement /Tractarians in the 1830s, and the Ritualist Movement in the Church of England about 40 years later. They are Anglicans who are very Catholic in doctrine, as opposed to those on the Evangelical side of Anglicanism.

What you are describing above, those Anglicans who separated from the official Worldwide Anglican Communion (the 38 national Anglican Churchs formally in communion with the Archbishop of Canterbury) recently, are known as Traditional Anglicans or Continuing Anglicans. True, many Continuing Anglicans are also Anglo-Catholics, but then so are many Anglicans who are still in the official Anglican Communion. Me, I’m both a Continuing Anglican and an Anglo-Catholic.

GKC
[/quote]

Thanks for the clarification. :thumbsup:


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