On receiving communion and civil marriage


#1

I have a friend who had a child out of wedlock and is now married civilly to the father of her child. She is a practicing Catholic but I don’t think her common-law husband is. The thing is I read somewhere that those married outside the Church should refrain from receiving communion. Should I tell her? She and I are only nodding acquaintances. Besides, I’m not sure if she is cohabiting with the man (he’s from another state).


#2

If you are only nodding acquaintances, you may not know all the facts of her situation and it may be imprudent to tell her she can’t receive communion. It is possible for your friend to have spoken with her pastor and to have an agreement that allows her to receive the sacraments.

“One final situation is that of those who have repented of their illicit union, but remain together for a serious reason, such as for the sake of their children. Catholic pastoral practice allows that IF their pastor judges that scandal can be avoided (meaning most people are unaware of their remarriage and consider them a married couple), then they may live together as “brother and sister” (without any sexual relations), and be admitted to the sacraments. If scandal can not be avoided, then they must either separate or refrain from the sacraments.”
ewtn.com/expert/answers/communion_of_divorced_and_remarr.htm


#3

Is she civilly married or is she in a common-law situation? These two are essentially opposites of each other. :confused:


#4

I’m not sure I understand this situation. How is it that she is “now civilly married”, and yet her husband is “common-law”?

If she is married, her husband and her do not live common-law. They are married. The Church recognizes this as marriage. Only her, her husband and priest will know the whole story. We should not make assumptions based on “what we think”.


#5

The Church does not recognize a marriage by a Catholic that does not follow form. The situation as stated is not a marriage. I agree with others you should not say anything as you do not know all of the circumstances.


#6

You have more questions than you have answers here- so it would probably be best to not to have an opinion until and if you ever find out what’s up.

A church wedding is also a “civil” wedding, as it is recognized by the civil authorities. A common law marriage may or may not be recognized by the government, depending on where you are at, and some people say they are “common law” when they are just shacking up.

If someone is Catholic and civilly married only, not married in church, they can still get their marriage regularized.

You also don’t know whether or not they are living together.


#7

#8

I don’t think I understand what common-law is. Anyway she’s not sacramentally married as far as I know. But she told me she was civilly married.


#9

Common Law in Colorado means that you have lived with someone and held yourself out as married without a marriage certificate. Common law is allowed in nine states.

Common Law marriage


#10

I’ve asked a lawyer friend and found out that there’s no common law marriages in Malaysia. So he’s not her common law husband, just husband by civil marriage. So back to my question: should I tell her or just give her the benefit of the doubt?


#11

I think you should encourage her to talk to her pastor about convalidation of the marriage in the Church and leave what she “should” and “should not” do to her priest. Encourage her to go see her priest about getting married in the Church. She may not know there is a difference between being married civilly and being married in the Church–a lot of young Catholics are unfortnately clueless.


#12

Since you are only an aquaintance, you do not know the whole story. So please mind your own business We have a couple in our Parish that had the same situation however they did have a convalidation ceremony that not everyone in the parish knew about. The only reason I know about it was because I was invited to the ceremony and reception.


#13

It depends which country you live in.
Here in the Philippines a Church wedding is not the recognised marriage by the State. Everyone here must have a civil marriage prior to a Church marriage.


#14

[quote=thistle] Quote:

Originally Posted by Kielbasi

You have more questions than you have answers here- so it would probably be best to not to have an opinion until and if you ever find out what’s up.

A church wedding is also a “civil” wedding, as it is recognized by the civil authorities. A common law marriage may or may not be recognized by the government, depending on where you are at, and some people say they are “common law” when they are just shacking up.

If someone is Catholic and civilly married only, not married in church, they can still get their marriage regularized.

You also don’t know whether or not they are living together.

It depends which country you live in.
Here in the Philippines a Church wedding is not the recognised marriage by the State. Everyone here must have a civil marriage prior to a Church marriage.
[/quote]

That’s not true, the Republic deputizes clergy to solomanize marriages. Only differing from most states one of the couple must belong to the denomination of the clergy member. It is the grounds First Sister Kris Aquino used to get an annulment

Posted from Catholic.com App for Android


closed #15

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.