On the papal plane: Pope Francis says the world is at war, but not a war of religions


#1

On the papal plane: Pope Francis says the world is at war, but not a war of religions bit.ly/2aezxew


#2

ive grown accustomed to seeing things through a spiritual warfare lense and tend to see war between true religion and lack thereof in many worldly conflicts, so Pope Francis’ remarks truly surprised me. So what we have is no longer a war between good and evil, between God and Satan, but only a war for financial interests? That seems very one dimensional. Looking forward to hearing some insights here.


#3

*“But it’s a real war, not a religious war,” Francis told journalists travelling with him to Poland.
“It’s a war of interests, a war for money. A war for natural resources and for the dominion of the peoples. Some might say it’s a religious war. Every religion wants peace. The war is wanted by the others. Understood?” he said.

He also referred to the murder of French priest Jacques Hamel, slain on Tuesday by two Islamic terrorists as he was saying Mass.
“This holy priest who died in the very moment he was offering a prayer for the whole Church, is [only] one, but there are so many Christians, so many innocents, so many children … let’s think about Nigeria … ‘But it’s Africa’ … But it’s war!”*

He seems to be saying that Muslims want peace but the radicals want war.

There are so many Muslims, can’t they alone control ISIS?


#4

From the article:

ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE- On his way to Krakow to participate in World Youth Day, a week-long Catholic celebration that’s often labeled as the religious version of Woodstock, Pope Francis denounced what he described as a worldwide war.

“But it’s a real war, not a religious war,” Francis told journalists travelling with him to Poland.
“It’s a war of interests, a war for money. A war for natural resources and for the dominion of the peoples. Some might say it’s a religious war. Every religion wants peace. The war is wanted by the others. Understood?” he said.

I would have to say that I respectfully disagree with the Pope’s opinion here.


#5

Every ideology ultimately desires peace. Even the Nazis wanted peace.


#6

they sure had a strange way of showing it (the way they treated the Jews, etc)

Where are the ones that want peace? Why aren’t they speaking out? Why aren’t they fighting ISIS? :frowning:


#7

I think he is referring to radical Muslims here.


#8

I agree with you. This life we have is a war. It is at the root between good and evil. Now we don’t want to push that way of thinking about it too far either way. Certainly religion or philosophy is at the very heart of this war. The most fundamental way we look at the world leads us to think and act in certain ways. I think Christendom has been at war with the Enlightenment, Modernism and now Postmodernism. Those are just internal threats. We certainly face external threats in the form of other religions which though they may contain some elements of truth by their error are at odds with the truth and therefore goodness.


#9

He didn’t say only a war for financial interests. He also said “dominion over peoples” - people trying to control others and take over their way of life.

That is not at all one dimensional.


#10

I will listen and learn from the Pope, not second guess and criticize him.


#11

Yes or we should at least read his words in their entirety and try to learn from what he is saying.


#12

I realize I didn’t paraphrase the pope’s words completely, but I was not trying to write an academic paper either. My point is, it seems the pope’s looking at conflicts strictly from a materialistic perspective, people trying to grab money power or what have you, but Where is the spiritual warfare aspect? This world has a problem and it’s called sin and the final solution is not provided by eradicating poverty and establishing equality but by the building of the kingdom of God and eventually the second coming of Christ. This has everything to do wth religion. All sin and darkness are rooted in spiritual evil. At least that’s what I’ve learned from the faith.

I’m trying to understand the Pope not to criticize him. Looking forward to hearing more perspective on this.


#13

I am not expecting you to write an academic paper in response to the Pope’s comments. :shrug:

I do not think his comments are limited to the conflicts of materialism only. He seemed to be saying, in somewhat guarded terms, that the problem is Islamic terrorism.

Islamic terrorists are not truly religious. They claim they are acting on behalf of God but this can’t be so, therefore they are really trying to have dominion over everyone and take away their freedoms. In other parts of the world, there is corruption and war over natural resources and money (oil?)

Pope Francis has said things that have caused me concern, however these statements are not out of line, IMO.


#14

Taking ISIS at its word, I think it actually is a war of religions.


#15

It must be really annoying for ISIS to be constantly told they’re wrong about why they’re fighting.


#16

I have learned not to take the word of anyone that is mentally deranged.


#17

Who has been in talks with ISIS? Who **tells **ISIS they are wrong?


#18

ISIS uses religion to mask its underlying causes such a social and political injustice, perceive social or political or historical wrongs, stripped of their land or rights, or denied these, alienation, discrimination, political grievances. There would be no ISIS if Sunni and Shea treated each other as equals…


#19

In that context, the Pope’s comments make a lot of sense.


#20

There are a lot of problems here, and certainly you highlight one of them. Why won’t some people believe their own eyes and ears? As perverted as ISIS is, much of their ideology is rooted in traditional Islam.

Second, progressives have been very adept at changing the meaning of words to win an argument. Justice, peace, tolerance, marriage, all mean whatever they want them to mean at any particular moment. Pax Romana was peace as long as you paid your taxes, worshiped the emperor when asked, and did not cause your Roman masters any problems. Stepping out of line had consequences that were anything but peaceful. Entire cities, including Jerusalem were destroyed to maintain “peace”. Islam requires a one world government, but many can’t decide which government that should be. It is not an argument for peace in any Christian sense.

Third, our post-Christian society can’t seem to understand that anyone would really ACT on a religious conviction. You can be personally pro-life, but vote opposite your personal convictions and no one should criticize you for that. They think religion is mere worship at best, and should be confined to your church, synagogue, or mosque on Sunday, Saturday, or Friday.


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