One fewer Christian-owned bakery after religious freedom fight


#1

“We lost our business,” Melissa Klein said in a February 2016 video produced by First Liberty Institute. “You work so hard to build something up, and something you’ve poured your heart into and was your passion, to lose that has been devastating for me.”

From CNA News here


#2

all because they wanted to freely refuse to promote gay marriage.

we can say goodbye to more freedoms if Hilary gets into the white house.


#3

We seem to have departed a long way from the idea of you live your life and i’ll live mine.


#4

It wasn’t a religious freedom fight. The bakery was fighting for the right to discriminate against people. They rightly lost.


#5

“Klein said his bakery sold its pastries and cakes to all customers, regardless of sexual orientation, but they turned down requests for cakes for same-sex ceremonies specifically.”


#6

You can have our baked goods… just not those ones, those are only for straights.


#7

Consumers are free to discriminate against businesses. If a customer refuses to go to a gay owned business, is that acceptable to you?


#8

Hillary Clinton has already told us we need to “change our religion” to accommodate abortion. The only remaining questions are what else she wants us to change our religion for and what she intends to do to make us change.


#9

Yes. Doesn’t say much about the customer but they’re free to do so.


#10

Yes.Wake up people.There is so much at stake re our personal freedoms.We will see more of the same and worse under a HC administration.:frowning:


#11

One less, not fewer. Weird Al’s “word crimes” should not have this effect on society, not to mention his song is grammatically inaccurate. Sorry, just a pet peeve.


#12

Not such a bad pet peeve. Thanks for educating us. :slight_smile:


#13

Why is it so one-sided? How come individual customers can be bigots but not individual business owners?


#14

Because businesses volunteer to follow all applicable local and state laws. The government have a long-understood compelling interest in regulating commerce and preventing discrimination. Individuals are allowed to hold whatever detestable views they want but they can’t run a place of public accommodation and discriminate against people.


#15

Since when is adhering to the law a voluntary action?

Long understood? More like long misunderstood. Public accommodation laws were a response to coercive government action. They replaced one type of coercion with another.

So your answer to “Why not?” is “The law says so.”? That’s not much of an answer.


#16

There is a huge difference between refusing to sell a generic baked good to a person because of their sexual orientation, and declining a commission for a custom cake (or other artwork such as a poem, painting, music, etc.) specifically in celebration of a ceremony that is against one’s religious beliefs.


#17

Dear Imachine -

Just to clarify, you said that the bakers “rightly lost”, but I noticed your religious affiliation is Catholic. Are you saying you disagree with the Catholic belief that marriage is between one man and one woman?


#18

By running a business you are volunteering to follow the laws that regulate businesses. Businesses are held to stricter standards than individuals. It is not an attack on religious freedom to not allow discrimination against LGBT people because no one forced you to run a business in the first place, you chose to do so and follow those antidiscrimination laws.


#19

I think business should be allowed to discriminate. But it should be required for their discrimination to be publicly posted. Signs like “We don’t serve Jews”, “Blacks please use the back door” and “No F**s Allowed” must be posted clearly for the public to see.

It will better help me decide who I can then discriminate against when I’m choosing who to do business with.


#20

This.


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