One more bunny question - sorry


#1

We’re going to try to litter train our bunny. I did alot of searching online and there are so many differing opinions on what liter to use. Cat liter is out because of the clumping and the fact that bunnies will ingest :eek: the liter (Ewwwh) Anyway, there was one site that recommended some cat liter that were eco friendly so I’m a “litter” confused. :o

Help1


#2

[quote="Lucky_Scrunchy, post:1, topic:247863"]
We're going to try to litter train our bunny. I did alot of searching online and there are so many differing opinions on what liter to use. Cat liter is out because of the clumping and the fact that bunnies will ingest :eek: the liter (Ewwwh) Anyway, there was one site that recommended some cat liter that were eco friendly so I'm a "litter" confused. :o

Help1

[/quote]

Owned by two cats here. Hi. :yup:

There are cat litter made from wheat chaff, which our kitten dined on in addition to pooed in so we had to stop using that. There's also litter made out of newspaper and still more made from pine pellets. We prefer the pine stuff because not only do our cats not eat it, but it also does a really good job at odor control. All of these call themselves 'eco friendly.'

Because you're planning to use litter with a bunny, my advice is to check with your vet before you buy just to make sure that what you're planning to use isn't going to harm your furry friend.


#3

We used pellets made from recycled newspapers. All our rabbits were housetrained but one thing we learned was that the toilet has to be kept clean (changed at least once a day) if we expected them to use it.
Don't use anything made from pine chips as pellets or as bedding. It is dangerous for rabbits and other small animals:

Please read this site: rabbit.org/care/shavings.html It was invaluable to us.
From the site:

There are two major concerns with the use of cedar and pineshavings as litter. The first is the documented alterations in the liver's specialized tools, called enzymes, that can alter your rabbit's ability to handle standard drugs that your vet will use in the treatment of your pet. The second is the relatively poorly characterized cancer risk.

Gearoidin


#4

[quote="Lucky_Scrunchy, post:1, topic:247863"]
We're going to try to litter train our bunny. I did alot of searching online and there are so many differing opinions on what liter to use. Cat liter is out because of the clumping and the fact that bunnies will ingest :eek: the liter (Ewwwh) Anyway, there was one site that recommended some cat liter that were eco friendly so I'm a "litter" confused. :o
Help1

[/quote]

Hi LuckyScrunchy:

I probably should not answer this as I despise rabbits. I really, really don't like them. They get into my crops and eat everything they can, and despite my best efforts (fencing, scarecrow water sprays, chemicals) I just can't get rid of them. But that being said, we do have two indoor cats, and also looked for an alternative to traditional clay-based litter. We use "Yesterday's News", a cat litter made from newspaper (believe it or not). It is claimed to be a good choice for rabbits too, so that might be a good choice:

exoticpets.about.com/cs/rabbits/a/rabbitslt.htm

Jacques


#5

I have a female Hot Tot. She is about six months to seven months old. We keep her in a cage, outdoors during the day, indoors at night. I've noticed a strange behavior (and I might add that I've never owned a Hot tot before, always Dutches and Lops). When I bring her in at night, she hops back and forth at the front of the cage, getting up on her hind legs and putting her paws on the door. She does this with ALOT of intensity, and usually starts doing this as you approach the cage. Last night, she even started biting the door. I opened the door to put some hay in and she got up on her hind legs and bit my hand. She was so intense!!!

I've never had a rabbit do this before. Does she want to be taken out and held? Does she just want out to run? Is this a hormonal thing? Is it a territorial thing? Is my rabbit just super aggressive?

i tried to join a bunny message board last night to pose my question but I could not get past the stupid security stuff (where you have to type the letters that look all strange).

Thanks for any help!!


#6

[quote="Lucky_Scrunchy, post:5, topic:247863"]
I have a female Hot Tot. She is about six months to seven months old. We keep her in a cage, outdoors during the day, indoors at night. I've noticed a strange behavior (and I might add that I've never owned a Hot tot before, always Dutches and Lops). When I bring her in at night, she hops back and forth at the front of the cage, getting up on her hind legs and putting her paws on the door. She does this with ALOT of intensity, and usually starts doing this as you approach the cage. Last night, she even started biting the door. I opened the door to put some hay in and she got up on her hind legs and bit my hand. She was so intense!!!

I've never had a rabbit do this before. Does she want to be taken out and held? Does she just want out to run? Is this a hormonal thing? Is it a territorial thing? Is my rabbit just super aggressive?

i tried to join a bunny message board last night to pose my question but I could not get past the stupid security stuff (where you have to type the letters that look all strange).

Thanks for any help!!

[/quote]

All our rabbits bit their cages mainly because they did not want to be locked in. We eventually created a bunny room and left their cages in it but always open. They were free to come and go as they pleased.

They became much calmer once we got them spayed. If you are not planning on breeding her, then you really should consider spaying. Our bunny had a false pregnancy when she was about 8 or 9 months old. She started lunging and biting - super agressive. Also non-spayed rabbits can get cancer...

Gearoidin


#7

I can't speak on the process, but as far as the litter goes, I know my girlfriend's litter-trained rabbit gets Aspen shavings, because I've had to carry the bales from the store to her house on more than one occasion.


#8

So my son has been letting our female rabbit out of her cage quite a bit this summer to run, supervised, around the inside of our house. She has taken to loving our cat! Loving, as in, if I did not know she was female, I would think she was a he! So it is really quite funny - the cat will lounge in front of the cage, my son lets the rabbit out, who chases the cat until the cat gets tired. The cat then jumps up on a chair or the couch and the rabbit starts thumping! When it is time for the rabbit to back into the cage, the cat suddenly reappears and resumes lounging in front. It is hilarious to watch!


#9

Oh how adorable is that?!


#10

Hi Lucky!

If you want to talk about indoor rabbits, just PM me!! We have a florida white named Leah, she lives indoors, is litter box trained, and walks on a leash. She has pretty much free reign of dd's room, and we have a couple boxes in the corners.

We use this, it does a great job of controlling odor. Petsmart has a good selection of bedding made for small animals. You are right to not use kitty litter. I don't use cedar or pine shavings at all, for us it seems the shavings were way messier, plus the smell.....


#11

Actually I did buy kitty litter but not the typical kitty litter, it was made of pine pellets. Thats okay right?:bigyikes::bigyikes::bigyikes:


#12

My Cat uses those same pellets. I find it superior to clumping clay litters or silica pellets.


#13

No, you should not use anything made of pine or cedar for rabbits and other small animals.

Documented scientific research has already shown that aromatic softwood beddings are potent enough to alter biological functions of the liver (Vesell, E.S. 1967)

What is it in the wood that’s doing damage? Apparently it’s not a result of ingesting but rather inhaling the fumes, which contain phenols, or toxins which pass in the fumes from the lungs to the blood and are finally filtered through the liver.

The fact that a large number of indoor house rabbits live in an environment of pine or cedar may account for the large number of deaths due to liver damage and anesthesia fatalities.

This has been known since the late 1960s yet pet stores and pet suppliers still sell these to rabbit owners.

Please look at the House Rabbit Society site:rabbit.org/
They have some really excellent articles on rabbit care and behaviour.

Gearoidin


#14

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