Online survey reveals "favorite" liturgical music

I have a feeling this won’t go over well around here…

catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0600465.htm

The results don’t surprise me at all. People like the songs they hear that have emotional impact on them. All the songs listed can be sung in such a way as to have a very emotional impact on those who are singing/listening.

Most people sitting in the pews are not thinking about the deeper theological meaning behind the the words of the song or what implications the ‘voice’ of the song has on them. They feel something. And the feeling is the basis on which they judge the song.

I honestly don’t think its all TOO surprising. On Eagles Wings DOES, though I am loathe to admit it, have its moments. The 6th paragraph really clarifies this article though. Only 8% of people voted for number 1.

Fantastic! I would love to see the full list but I could not find it anywhere online.

Although I am anxious to see how “Gather Us In” fared, I am relieved to see “Lord of the Dance” squeaked into the top 25! :rolleyes:

Of the 3,000 respondents, I would guess that the majority of them are subjected to these songs so often that they do not know any better. Maybe it’s like holding hands during the Our Father; most people (like me) unsuspectingly think it is supposed to be thay way and go along with it until they learn that it is not.

What I find most interesting is this statement in the article:McMahon [the Association’s President] said, “I’m always surprised how many young people ask for ‘Ave Maria’ or ‘Panis Angelicus’ at weddings and funerals.”

So, when free to choose, many “young people” request things more traditional.

While there are plenty of rank and file Catholics that might like this music (it is what has become most familiar to them over the past few decades after all), I suspect these results are primarily based on the respondent who are liturgist types (that comprise the readers of a publication like “Pastoral Music”). So it pretty much tells us that the people who have implemented “spirit of VII” music like the music they’ve subjected us to. Surprise, surprise…

Here is an alternative point of view:
Top Ten Catholic Hymns
adoremus.org/0905Hymns.html

Five Fine Contemporary Hymns
adoremus.org/1005LucyCarroll.html

These songs are what people know.

So this hymn that ranked something like 14th, “The Summons.” Anybody got a read on how fast it goes? What’s the meter? The ten times in my life a group under my leadership has sung this at Mass, we’ve gone 1 beat to a bar at 60 beats-per-minute. The last time I heard someone else lead this hymn, it was 3 beats to a bar, and about 96 beats-per-minute. It was so slow that I fell asleep!

This is such a non story!!! The poll was taken in Pastoral Music, which is obviously aimed at music ministers. So, the audience who voted will mainly be music ministers. So the music they like to choose for Mass will be the music that shows up in the polls. This would be like having Hollywood actors decide which movies are the best ones.

On the positive side, no where on the list did I see “Gather Us In”…not that it means much.

:whistle:

[quote=Confiteor]Here is an alternative point of view:
Top Ten Catholic Hymns
adoremus.org/0905Hymns.html
[/quote]

**

**#7 **

“Stabat Mater Dolorosa” **

I love this one! When my girlfriend and I do the Stations of the Cross together she sings a stanza (in Latin) after each Station. :thumbsup:

not surprising since the people they polled have probably not heard anything except Gather, St Louis Jesuits, Haugan, Haas, Landry et al for decades. we are lucky to hear anything from the Adoremus list once or twice a year, or during Benediction or at a wedding, seldom during Mass.

I do not understand why people won’t use the traditional hymns, like those in the Adoremus hymnal. They can rearrange the songs so that they sound a bit more lively if that’s what people want (like they do on a lot of CD’s, and like you hear people do on the EWTN Backstage shows or on the little clips they show throughout the day).

Soul of My Savior (AH 522) :smiley: I really should buy one of these hymnals. They are great!

[quote=asquared]the people they polled have probably not heard anything except Gather, St Louis Jesuits, Haugan, Haas, Landry et al for decades.
[/quote]

It’s strange how people call this “contemporary”- we call popular music that is this old ‘retro’.

I do not see why the survey results would be upsetting. They are what they are. I find them useful because I like to sing mostly what the parish likes. That way they more fully participate. As long as I do not find particular lyrics to be uncatholic, I’m all for it.

[quote=MusicMan]So this hymn that ranked something like 14th, “The Summons.” Anybody got a read on how fast it goes? What’s the meter? The ten times in my life a group under my leadership has sung this at Mass, we’ve gone 1 beat to a bar at 60 beats-per-minute. The last time I heard someone else lead this hymn, it was 3 beats to a bar, and about 96 beats-per-minute. It was so slow that I fell asleep!
[/quote]

Music Man,
The meter signature is 3/4 and the tempo is a dotted half note = 63 / min … so your 1 beat/measure at 60/min is about what the composers intended.

Larry

Here is a story with the complete top 25 list taken from our Archdiocese newsletter:

Songs That Make a Difference…A Report on the NPM Survey

[font=Times New Roman]During the months of August and September, 2005, the National Association of Pastoral Musicians (NPM) conducted a national online survey called “Songs That Make a Difference.” We invited Catholics all over the United States to name a liturgical song that has made a lasting impact on their own life of faith and then to provide a brief explanation for their choice.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman][/font]
[font=Times New Roman]We were surprised and delighted to receive more than 3,000 responses to the survey. The questionnaire was completed by a variety of respondents, including directors of music ministries, choirs members, and average parishioners. Participants in the survey also reflected a wide assortment of ages, from elementary school students to retired persons.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]We hope in the not too distant future to procure funding for a more in-depth study of the practice and pastoral impact of American Catholic liturgical music. In the meantime, however, this survey of Songs That Make a Difference reveals some very interesting patterns among those who responded.[/font]

**[font=TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT]1. A very wide variety of songs. **There is no one song or style of singing that dominates the responses. In fact, the 3,009 survey respondents named more than 670 different songs. Although On Eagle’s Wings was chosen by more participants than any other single song, it was nonetheless the selection of just eight percent of those who participated[/font]

**[font=TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT]2. A wide variety of musical styles. **Most of the top twenty-five songs selected by survey respondents derive from two major streams:[/font]

[font=TimesNewRomanPSMT]o Catholic contemporary music (13), including compositions of Michael Joncas, Dan Schutte, Bob Dufford, sj, David Haas, Marty Haugen, Sebastian Temple, Suzanne Toolan, rsm, Cesáreo Gabaráin, Donna McCargill, osm, John Foley, sj, and Gregory Norbet.[/font]

[font=TimesNewRomanPSMT]o *Traditional Catholic music (6) *, both metrical and chant hymns, mostly in Latin, including Holy God, We Praise Thy Name; Ave Maria; Panis Angelicus; Ave Verum Corpus; Tantum Ergo; and Pange Lingua.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]The remaining six songs among the top twenty-five choices include hymns from traditional Protestant/ Evangelical and contemporary religious (not Catholic) sources.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]3. Associated with significant events .[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]In explaining the choice of a song that has made an impact on their faith, a large number of respondents related that it had been used at an important celebration —the funeral of a loved one or friend, the baptism of a child, a wedding, or a religious profession. Funeral celebrations were by far the most commonly cited occasions on which a particular song made a lasting effect.[/font]

**[font=TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT]4. Associated with childhood experiences . **Another large group of respondents chose songs that they recalled from childhood and that have continued to evoke and express a connection to faith and to the Church.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]These findings suggest several practical consequences for the ministry of pastoral musicians. Because the survey revealed such a wide variety of songs that make a difference, musicians and other pastoral leaders should be attentive to the many different musical styles that nourish and support the faith of American Catholics, taking care not merely to choose music from our own personal taste but to make selections out of a pastoral concern for the members of our communities.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]We need to take a critical look at the musical selections commonly used for major celebrations—especially funerals—through the lens of the Church’s evangelizing role. We should ask ourselves if these songs are able to bear the weight of inspiring and sustaining faith.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]Finally, pastoral musicians and other leaders should take very seriously the impact that our music making has on the children in our midst. Are we introducing our children to repertoire that can last a lifetime? The following are the top twenty-five songs identified by our respondents as making a difference in their own lives of faith.[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]1. On Eagle’s Wings (242)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]2. Here I Am, Lord (152)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]3. Be Not Afraid (146)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]4. You Are Mine (138)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]5. How Great Thou Art (76)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]6. Holy God, We Praise Thy Name (70)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]7. Amazing Grace (69)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]8. All Are Welcome (58)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]9. Prayer of St. Francis (43)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]10. Ave Maria (42)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]11. We Are Called (38)[/font][font=Times New Roman].[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]12. Let There Be Peace on Earth (36)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]13. I Am the Bread of Life (30)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]14. The Summons (30)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]15. Panis Angelicus (29)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]16. The Servant Song—Gillard (29)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]17. Pescador de Hombres (28)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]18. Servant Song—McCargill (28)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]19. Shepherd Me, O God (27)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]20. Ave Verum Corpus (26)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]21. Lord of the Dance (24)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]22. One Bread, One Body (24)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]23. Tantum Ergo (24)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]24. Hosea (23)[/font]
[font=Times New Roman]25. Pange Lingua (23)[/font]

[font=Times New Roman]What is your favorite song? Send us an email and let us know what song is your favorite and why. We will create our own top twenty-five songs for our area. Please email us at oremus@ archmil.org[/font]

Just a humorous… or perhaps sad side-story…

A Bishop of a Midwestern Diocese once informally attempted to ban On Eagle’s Wings by telling people at Diocesesan music workshops that he had grown tired of hearing the song at Confirmation. Unfortunately, a lot of church musicians out there think they’re above workshops, so they don’t attend, or if they do, they only listen to the things they want to hear.

I had been doing a lot of work in the local churches as an organist during my high school years, so I had attended a workshop or two. When it came time for me to be confirmed, I told my parish’s music director that the Bishop doesn’t like On Eagle’s Wings. I was told to mind my own business. My Mother, who had been with me at one of the workshops told the music director that I was right, and my Mother was told to mind her own business. Guess what the choir sang at Offeratory? That’s right! On Eagle’s Wings.

I watched the Bishop very closely when the Commentator announced the song. I swear to this day that I saw him very unsuccessfully try to keep himself from rolling his eyes.

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

[quote=frommi]I have a feeling this won’t go over well around here…

catholicnews.com/data/stories/cns/0600465.htm
[/quote]

I knew one church that liked to rock out to Salve Regina from Sister Act. they did it for a month untill thier bishop showed up by surprise. now they use a more traditional version.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.