Only 4% of America is Christian?


#1

I heard on a Christian (i.e. Protestant) radio station today that only 4% of the United States is Christian. As the man talked more, he quoted this statistic again but said ‘bible-believing Christians’. I’m assuming he didn’t include Catholics in that group since we don’t believe in ‘Scripture Alone’ and sadly that would seem to imply he doesn’t consider us Christians. But, the percentage surprised me even with that exclusion.

Anyone heard this statistic before? He didn’t quote a source.


#2

Right. My guess is he is excluding whole chunks of denominations he does not think are Christian. Without a source though I couldn’t say.

Scott


#3

Most of the time these preachers are excluding anyone outside their own small group, everyone else being disqualified as true Christians for not believing the Bible as interpreted by them.

Same old same old! :rolleyes:

Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty I’m free at last!

Jeanette


#4

No more surprising then the opposite statistic I have heard quoted that says fully 95 + % of America is Christian.

It all depends on what the definition of ‘is’ is…

smile.

Z


#5

[quote=Elzee]I heard on a Christian (i.e. Protestant) radio station today that only 4% of the United States is Christian. As the man talked more, he quoted this statistic again but said ‘bible-believing Christians’. I’m assuming he didn’t include Catholics in that group since we don’t believe in ‘Scripture Alone’ and sadly that would seem to imply he doesn’t consider us Christians. But, the percentage surprised me even with that exclusion.

Anyone heard this statistic before? He didn’t quote a source.
[/quote]

There is a tendency among some fundamentalists to view themselves as the only legitimate Christians. It leads to an ‘us against them’ sort of mentality.


#6

Honestly, it’s impossible to judge who is genuinely Christian. How can we know someone’s heart? It’s a pretty fruitless exercise.

Kendy


#7

[quote=Elzee]I heard on a Christian (i.e. Protestant) radio station today that only 4% of the United States is Christian. As the man talked more, he quoted this statistic again but said ‘bible-believing Christians’. I’m assuming he didn’t include Catholics in that group since we don’t believe in ‘Scripture Alone’ and sadly that would seem to imply he doesn’t consider us Christians. But, the percentage surprised me even with that exclusion.

Anyone heard this statistic before? He didn’t quote a source.
[/quote]

I think he’s excluding everyone excepting those he knows personally in his denomination. :frowning:

According Adherents.com, based upon American Religious Identity Survey (ARIS) conducted in 2001, with a sample size of 50,000 Americans, **76.5% of the US adult population **claim to be Christian. (source: adherents.com/rel_USA.html )


#8

[quote=itsjustdave1988]I think he’s excluding everyone excepting those he knows personally in his denomination. :frowning:

According Adherents.com, based upon American Religious Identity Survey (ARIS) conducted in 2001, with a sample size of 50,000 Americans, **76.5% of the US adult population **claim to be Christian. (source: adherents.com/rel_USA.html )
[/quote]

Does claiming to a Christian make one a Christian?

Kendy


#9

Exactly.


#10

[quote=Kendy]Does claiming to a Christian make one a Christian?

Kendy
[/quote]

A lot of people claim to be Christian because they aren’t anything else, kind of by default. There is of course a difference between a cultural Christian and a Christian who has had an inner conversion and personal committment to Christ and his teaching. The tares will grow up with the wheat, only Christ will determine who is who at the judgement.

A sober thought. :frowning:

God Bless,
Jeanette


#11

[quote=Kendy]Does claiming to a Christian make one a Christian?

Kendy
[/quote]

According to Catholic teaching, the sacrament of baptism or its desire brings its effect. Thus, in this sense those who have honestly claimed or believe themselves to be Christian may be understood to have at least an implicit desire for the sacrament of baptism, and thus may be understood to be joined to the Catholic Church in soul, although not necessarily in body, so long as their desire is animated by perfect charity and supernatural faith.

However, even Catholics who have been joined in body, are not necessarily joined in soul to Christ’s Church. Those who are visibily members of the Catholic Church through baptism may be separated from Christ through their wickedness. Thus, claims to Christianity mean very little in the eyes of God, if the sacrament of faith is not lived by the faith of the sacrament.


#12

[quote=itsjustdave1988]According to Catholic teaching, the sacrament of baptism or its desire brings its effect. Thus, in this sense those who have honestly claimed or believe themselves to be Christian may be understood to have at least an implicit desire for the sacrament of baptism, and thus may be understood to be joined to the Catholic Church in soul, although not necessarily in body, so long as their desire is animated by perfect charity and supernatural faith.

However, even Catholics who have been joined in body, are not necessarily joined in soul to Christ’s Church. Those who are visibily members of the Catholic Church through baptism may be separated from Christ through their wickedness. Thus, claims to Christianity mean very little in the eyes of God, if the sacrament of faith is not lived by the faith of the sacrament.
[/quote]

That’s what I meant to say! :smiley:

Jeanette


#13

[quote=deb1]There is a tendency among some fundamentalists to view themselves as the only legitimate Christians. It leads to an ‘us against them’ sort of mentality.

[/quote]

Hi
You mean like this?

From the CCC

“Outside the Church there is no salvation”

846 How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers?335 Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.336

847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation.337

848 "Although in ways known to himself God can lead those who, through no fault of their own, are ignorant of the Gospel, to that faith without which it is impossible to please him, the Church still has the obligation and also the sacred right to evangelize all men."338

Thanks.


#14

[quote=Jeanette L]Most of the time these preachers are excluding anyone outside their own small group, everyone else being disqualified as true Christians for not believing the Bible as interpreted by them.

Same old same old! :rolleyes:

Free at last, free at last. Thank God Almighty I’m free at last!

Jeanette
[/quote]

Good for you Jeanette! Isn’t it wonderful to finally find the truth and break free of those chains that bind in Protestantism?

It is certainly a “calling” to be called OUT of the Protestant faith!

Thanks be to God!


#15

Must be more than that.
22% of the US population is Catholic.


#16

[quote=NonDenom]Hi
You mean like this?

From the CCC

“Outside the Church there is no salvation”

846 How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers?335 Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.336

847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience - those too may achieve eternal salvation.337

848 "Although in ways known to himself God can lead those who, through no fault of their own, are ignorant of the Gospel, to that faith without which it is impossible to please him, the Church still has the obligation and also the sacred right to evangelize all men."338

Thanks.
[/quote]

That sounds surprisingly open to me, much more then any fundamentalist church that I attended, which seemed to view even other fundamentalist with suspicion.

From your own post:
**847 This affirmation is not aimed at those who, through no fault of their own, do not know Christ and his Church: **

I don’t know your particular beliefs but there are some fundamentalist who deny the concept of invincible ignorance.

Of course, I am not calling you a fundamentalist either.

It seems to me that many of the people that would deny Catholics the right to be called Christian would probably not call many Protestants Christian either.


#17

[quote=Kendy]Does claiming to a Christian make one a Christian?

Kendy
[/quote]

Well since we are to leave judgment to God, then I don’t see why we can’t give someone who claims to be Christian the benefit of the doubt.
This world is full of enough divisions like that 4% figure and that “Catholics aren’t Christians” nonsense for us to even think about perpetuating it further by trying to draw lines.
We can say a certain behavior may be unchristian or contrary to teaching but don’t exclude the people

Besides, who are we to know what is in someone’s heart?


#18

[quote=steveandersen]Well since we are to leave judgment to God, then I don’t see why we can’t give someone who claims to be Christian the benefit of the doubt.
This world is full of enough divisions like that 4% figure and that “Catholics aren’t Christians” nonsense for us to even think about perpetuating it further by trying to draw lines.
We can say a certain behavior may be unchristian or contrary to teaching but don’t exclude the people

Besides, who are we to know what is in someone’s heart?
[/quote]

This is actually a good point.


#19

[quote=deb1]This is actually a good point.
[/quote]

every once in a rare while the light comes on :wink:


closed #20

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