Only Catholics have daily Masses?

In a discussion about why there should not be married priests in the Catholic Church someone said: if there are Protestants ministers there can be Catholic priests, but someone replied: Protestants ministers only have to attend one Sunday service while Catholic priests often have to celebrate several Masses not only on Sundays but daily! Imagine Father telling you: there will not be 8 a.m. daily Mass anymore because I have to take my kids to school, and no 7 pm daily Mass either because I have to help them with their homework. It seems a good point. Is it true only Catholic priest celebrate daily religious services?

Alma

That is a nice point. Yes, I do believe that Catholics are the only one’s with a daily mass. Protestant services are mostly about the sermon. My friend’s methodist church only has communion once a month, but they don’t believe in the true presence so what would be the point of having a daily service in this case?

My church celebrates the liturgy on a daily basis, and twice on Saturday, twice on Sunday, along with other weekly services, and our priests are married.

God Bless,
Elizabeth

Do protestant ministers have “day jobs”? Or do they work on their sermon all week? This probably sounds a little offensive, but I don’t mean it to be such. I’m just curious what they do the rest of the week.

i’m just going to toss in a thought that has on occasions occurred to me.

how beautiful it is that, no matter the time of day or night, mass is constantly being offered. and, due to the international date line, the blessed sacrament is always present, some where in the world

Protestant churches have service twice on SUnday and usually, Wednesday night. Most of the wives of pastors seem to accept that they do not come first in their husbands’ lives. In fact pator wives are usually very involved in church ministries-which is admirable. At the same time, I am grateful that priests don’t have to choose to neglect their wives for their job.

Just as an aside as former members of our Independent Baptist Church, my husband and I, along with other church members, decided how much salary the pastor recieved. So the pastor I knew had a full time job in the church. I have known others that had to work outside to make ends meet.

[quote=jjwilkman]i’m just going to toss in a thought that has on occasions occurred to me.

how beautiful it is that, no matter the time of day or night, mass is constantly being offered. and, due to the international date line, the blessed sacrament is always present, some where in the world
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Check out Malachi 1:10-11 :slight_smile:

I used to be against any married clergy, but i have since determined that it stemmed from a lack of understanding of the eastern traditions that cam from my parents. I have sicne discovered the beauty and dignity of the non-latin rites. Personally i have no idea how eastern priests do it, but if it works, it works and i wont knock it. But also, dont eastern churches usually have multiple priests and so can acomodate for the needs of a married priest? Latin churches are lucky to have 1 priest.
As for latin priests. celebacy is a wonderful tradition just as the holy examples the married eastern presyters are, both should remain part of their rites, proudly.

Why do all of you insist on going on about a matter that is not up for discussion, in the Catholic Church?

[quote=Meggie]Why do all of you insist on going on about a matter that is not up for discussion, in the Catholic Church?
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I thought that we were just discussing the fact that only Catholics have daily mass. If you can tell us in a little more detail what we are discussing that is wrong then we might be able to agree with you. Do you mean celibacy for priests? I don’t think that anyone thus far is disagreeing with the Churches stance.

[quote=Meggie]Why do all of you insist on going on about a matter that is not up for discussion, in the Catholic Church?
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The celibate priesthood is disciplinary and therefore cannot be infallibly proclaimed. So it could change at any time. I don’t think it would be a good idea, but it could change.

[quote=deb1]I thought that we were just discussing the fact that only Catholics have daily mass. If you can tell us in a little more detail what we are discussing that is wrong then we might be able to agree with you. Do you mean celibacy for priests? I don’t think that anyone thus far is disagreeing with the Churches stance.
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this discussion has tured into just such a debate…questioning the value of celabate Priesthood

[quote=Catholicgolfer]That is a nice point. Yes, I do believe that Catholics are the only one’s with a daily mass. Protestant services are mostly about the sermon. My friend’s methodist church only has communion once a month, but they don’t believe in the true presence so what would be the point of having a daily service in this case?
[/quote]

Incorrect - Methdoists DO believe in Real Presence. But very few Methodists celebrate eucharist daily. In some churches (one I was previously appointed to), it was celebrated twice a week. A decent Methodist worship service ought to be mostly about worshiping God, not about the sermon.

Most United Methodist pastors are appointed to charges or parishes that have more than one church - some may celebrate two, three, or even four services a Sunday.

I am the senior pastor of a parish of five churches; one mother church and four small churches. I have an associate pastor (also ordained) and three lay assistants.

As far as what I do during the week… I usually work about a 60 hour week - most other clergy I know work similar weeks. Outside of a lectionary study group that meets weekly, I might spend 4-5 hours on a sermon. Pastoral counseling, worship planning, church administration, visiting the sick, adult catechism classes, mid-week morning prayer, prayer offices, youth confirmation classes, ongoing adult classes, a bible study class or two, and occasional conference (i.e. diocesan) meetings usually keep my week pretty busy. Saturday evening services are about 6 months away from becoming a reality, I suspect.

And I do have a wife and a daughter. And I do get to spend time with them. While my week can be hectic… who’s isn’t? And, my vocation does have some flexibility that others do not.

O+

Eastern Orthodox also have Divine Liturgy daily, though it is not always practical or possible in every diocese. For example, there are many missions where the priest is only able to come once a month or every two weeks to serve Divine Liturgy. My own church celebrates Divine Liturgy daily, but then we are the second largest parish in Greece :smiley:

John

P.S. Three of our four priests are married and have many children.

Many High-Church Anglican/Episcopalian congregations have one or two daily Eucharistic Liturgies. In addition, many of those same parishes have Morning and Evening Prayer daily.

A friend of mine is a lay assistant at, I believe, St. Peter’s in the Loop, an Episcopal Parish in Chicago. Morning and Evening Prayer daily, two communions daily, and something like four or six on Sunday.

As noted earlier, the Orthodox/Eastern Rites of the Church in Communion with Rome celebrate either a full Divine Liturgy or a Presanctified Liturgy on a pretty much daily basis.

I am not in communion with Rome, but in my practice, I celebrate or concelebrate six out of seven days a week, with the only reason I don’t on Saturdays is because I am usually travelling or otherwise not in a position to be at an altar. My bishop, who travels even more than I do for the most part, celebrates at least a Presanctified Liturgy on weekdays, but celebrates Divine Liturgy at least three or four times a week.

Rob+

Not all Protestant church’s have two Sunday services and a Wednesday evening one. Some just have one on Sunday…

[quote=Genesis315]Do protestant ministers have “day jobs”? Or do they work on their sermon all week? This probably sounds a little offensive, but I don’t mean it to be such. I’m just curious what they do the rest of the week.
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At one of the non denom churches we went to the Pastor had a part time job mowing lawns & doing landscaping. It was a small church & he probably needed to supplement his income because he had a wife & two children.

[quote=deb1]Protestant churches have service twice on SUnday and usually, Wednesday night.
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Actually only the fundamentalist minority of Protestants have church services on Sunday and Wednesday evenings.

The vast majority of Protestants (Presbyterians, UCC, Lutherans, Reformed, Methodists, Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), etc.) Have services only on Sunday morning.

BTW there are a lot of Episcopal churches that have daily Mass, also daily Morning and Evening Prayer, the Liturgy of the Hours.

I guess that everyone has heard the old joke about Protestant Ministers “Id love to have an easy job like yours where you only work one hour a week”.

The truth about ministers and Priests is a lot different though. Clergy (both Catholic and Prostestant) have a lot more to do than Masses/services, and sermon prep.

Weddings and funerals for instance. Hospital visitation, meeting of various commitees in the parish, marriage counseling, regular counseling.

And of course Catholic Priests have even more to do. Due to the shortage of Priests many spend a lot of time driving form church to church celebrating Masses. Spending hours sitting in the confessional. And here where I live they also have to do quncineras for Latino 15 years old girls.

It ain’t an easy job folks.

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