Only Catholics pray the Hail Mary?


#1

A non Catholic friend of mine aske me who composed the Hail Mary. I told him it was a very old prayer and that it was based on the Bible. :bible1:
He asked if only Catholics pray it and I was not sure what to respond. :confused:

I’d appreciate your comments on this.

Thank you!

:blessyou:

Alma


#2

[quote=Alma]A non Catholic friend of mine aske me who composed the Hail Mary. I told him it was a very old prayer and that it was based on the Bible. :bible1:
He asked if only Catholics pray it and I was not sure what to respond. :confused:

I’d appreciate your comments on this.

[/quote]

The Orthodox recite it and sing it in this form…

Virgin Mother of God, rejoice,
Mary full of grace, the Lord is with thee,
blessed art thou amongst women and
blessed is the fruit of thy womb
for thou hast borne the Saviour of our souls.

See
The Orthodox Prayerbook
myriobiblos.gr/texts/english/prayerbook/main.htm


#3

Episcopalians do it as well apparently, because I am attending a Living Rosary on Sunday at the Episcopal Church. It is an inter-faith ecumenical event. Both the Episcopal and Catholic Bishops will be there.


#4

[quote=Alma]A non Catholic friend of mine aske me who composed the Hail Mary. I told him it was a very old prayer and that it was based on the Bible. :bible1:
He asked if only Catholics pray it and I was not sure what to respond. :confused:

I’d appreciate your comments on this.

Thank you!

:blessyou:

Alma
[/quote]

The answer is that** anyone** can say the Hail Mary. That doesn’t mean that their particular church condones the prayer or that person wouldn’t come under a lot of fire from other church members for doing so.


#5

[quote=JackmanUSC]Episcopalians do it as well apparently, because I am attending a Living Rosary on Sunday at the Episcopal Church. It is an inter-faith ecumenical event. Both the Episcopal and Catholic Bishops will be there.
[/quote]

Anglicans (that is, the generic Church that Episcopalians are a specific form of) do it too, including in the singing of the Angelus.

JackmanUSC, I hope you report on how that goes. I note that there will be the monthly Latin Tridentine Mass that Sunday at the RC Church of the Good Shepherd.

GKC


#6

Some Lutherans pray the Hail Mary apparently since there’s a book by a Lutheran pastor called “A Protestatn Pastor Looks at Mary” or something like that.


#7

Christos Voskrese!

The Hail Mary is actually two prayers, joined together.

As constructed today some people have asserted that the prayer does not go back any further than the fifteenth century. Although it’s constituent parts are likely much older. I think that this magnificent prayer deserves some reflection.

From another website:

Words are taken from the Gospel of St. Luke and join together the words of the Angel Gabriel at the Annunciation (Luke 1:28) with Elizabeth’s greeting to Mary at the Visitation (Luke 1:42).

Hail: salute, greet or call

To say hail Mary! is to say hello. When the angel Gabriel greeted Mary at the annunciation it was like saying “hello Mary”, likely with great joy. As Father Ambrose points out, the Eastern version of the English translation has Gabriel telling Mary to rejoice instead of merely saying hello. So, was he saying “hello” joyfully? Or was he telling her to rejoice?

I think likely both, he was joyfully proclaiming that Mary was blessed by God, and asking her to rejoice with him, and we do too!

Rejoice! Mary full of Grace, the Lord is with you!
Blessed are you among women, and blessed is the fruit of your womb Jesus.

Mary is blessed, and Jesus is blessed! This becomes our blessing too.

The second half of the Hail Mary prayer was added at sometime during the 16th century.

The second part is a lot like the ejaculatory prayers early Christians were so very fond of, and may have been sung separately at one time. Another such prayer is the Jesus prayer, in its shorter form goes like this: “Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me a sinner!”

To say Holy Mary is as to say “saint Mary”. Mary is sanctified and deified, she is holy as we are all called to be holy. She is the great example. As we pray for each other, we especially appreciate her prayers for us, this is an appeal to her to keep us in mind and stay by our side.

Holy Mary, mother of God, pray for us sinners…
now and at the hour of our death.

Amen, amen, amen!


#8

Why is it that we Catholics do pray the Hail Mary and say the rosary? I was asked similar questions and never knew what the ‘official’ reason was.


#9

[quote=cantrell]Why is it that we Catholics do pray the Hail Mary and say the rosary? I was asked similar questions and never knew what the ‘official’ reason was.
[/quote]

We are fulfilling Scripture. Fulfilling Mary’s words that “All generations will call me blessed.”

From the CCC

971 “All generations will call me blessed”: “The Church’s devotion to the Blessed Virgin is intrinsic to Christian worship.” The Church rightly honors “the Blessed Virgin with special devotion. From the most ancient times the Blessed Virgin has been honored with the title of ‘Mother of God,’ to whose protection the faithful fly in all their dangers and needs. . . . This very special devotion . . . differs essentially from the adoration which is given to the incarnate Word and equally to the Father and the Holy Spirit, and greatly fosters this adoration.” The liturgical feasts dedicated to the Mother of God and Marian prayer, such as the rosary, an “epitome of the whole Gospel,” express this devotion to the Virgin Mary.


#10

[quote=cantrell]Why is it that we Catholics do pray the Hail Mary and say the rosary? I was asked similar questions and never knew what the ‘official’ reason was.
[/quote]

Until the 16th century, all European Christians were Catholics, and all prayed the Hail Mary.


#11

[quote=Alma]A non Catholic friend of mine aske me who composed the Hail Mary. I told him it was a very old prayer and that it was based on the Bible. :bible1:
He asked if only Catholics pray it and I was not sure what to respond. :confused:

[/quote]

Hi Alma -

The Rosary reminds us of what Jesus lived through and did for us. By praying the Rosary, people obtain a deeper appreciation of these events in His life.

The origin of the Rosary is not clear. During the earliest days of the Church, Catholics used prayer beads and the repetitive prayers. There is evidence that beads were used to assist prayers in the Middle Ages.

During the fifteenth century, the Rosary structure formed. Fifty Hail Mary’s were recited and were linked with verses of psalms. The prayer was called rosarim meaning rose garden. Later, the name became the Rosary.

Saint Dominick is the person that designed the structure of the Rosary. He was moved by a vision of our Blessed Mother. The Rosary became popular in the 1500’s. There were many wars, and people turned to the Rosary for comfort. On October 7, 1572, Pope St. Pius V established the Feast of the Holy Rosary.

The Rosary prayer brings human solidarity. It reflects the intent of Mary and Jesus. This prayer can be said by anyone in the world. The world is surrounded by tensions and war. The Rosary can help, and is necessary that prayers for peace be raised to God through out the world.

How to Recite the Holy Rosary.

Hope that helps
God bless,
Subrosa


#12

The rosary is a prayer rule. All chaplets are prayer rules and the rosary is the most popular.

We are to “pray without ceasing”.

The Liturgy of the Hours is one way of fulfilling this command. Christians from the earliest days all prayed at different times of the day, sanctifying time. In the apostolic era time was kept in discreet three hour segments called a “watch”, and Christians developed the practice of pausing at the turn of the watch to pray the Psalms.

Cenobites (monks) and hermits have kept this practice into modern times, changing it as needed over the years. Most monks and nuns of early days were not literate but had the benefit of memorizing the Psalms through repitition.

The local people, mostly poorly educated, wanted to also have a devotion that would serve the purpose of a prayerful and meditative experience. The rosary then, came to be that devotion.

To quote another website:
**The rosary did not originate in a miraculous way, given in a form never to be changed. Throughout the early middle ages, various ways were developed for participating in some way in the Church’s continual prayer of the 150 psalms in the Divine Office. At first, individuals said the Our Father 150 times; later, as the Hail Mary became more widespread, this prayer was repeated 150 times. **

**Our present form of the rosary developed in Carthusian monasteries in the 14th and 15th centuries. It consisted of the Scriptural verses of the Hail Mary with 50, then 150, little “inserts” (clausulae) added after the name of Jesus. The clausulae became the “mysteries” and were divided into three sets of fifty each. Finally, the clausulae or mysteries were reduced to the present fifteen joyful, sorrowful, and glorious mysteries. **

**In the middle ages, there were different forms for the second part of the Hail Mary. The present text appeared for the first time in the Roman Breviary (1568). No directive indicated that this form was to be used in the Rosary. In its original approbation (1569), the rosary was spoken of as the “contemplation of the mysteries of Christ combined with the Angel’s Greeting.” **The granting of indulgences caused the rosary’s form to remain unchanged for more than four hundred years. All indulgenced prayers were to be recited according to the prescribed form–without any deviation. Even commendable customs, such as the insertion of the clausulae, were suppressed unless an exception was granted, as was done for German-speaking areas where the clausulae were customarily added.

In light of the origins of the rosary as a substitute for the 150 Psalms, and it’s original form consisting of Paternosters, I am very flexible as to the prayer devotions I might recommend.

Usually if I find an interested inquirer who is put off by the rosary I suggest they try it as 150 Our Fathers or 150 Jesus Prayers. They can break it into decades with a doxology, or a creed, eventually trying the Hail Mary once between each decade.

There is no reason for this form of prayer to be a difficulty, especially considering the Mysteries that are such valuable meditiations for a new Christian.


#13

Thank you very much, your answers have been very useful, since I am writing an article on this wonderful prayer.

:tiphat:

Alma


#14

As pointed out, Catholics, Orthodox, and some Anglicans and Lutherans pray the Hail Mary.

It is in its most beautiful forms in
español -
Dios te salve, Maria,
tu eres llena de gracia,
El Señor es contigo!
Bendita tu eres entre toda las mujeres
y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesus.
Oh, Santa Maria, Madre de Dios,
ora por nosotros pecadores,
ahora y en la hore de nuestra muerte.
Amen.

and nothing beats the original Latin -
**Ave Maria, gratia plena
Dominus tecum
Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Jesus.
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei
Ora pro nobis peccatoribus
nunc et hora mortis nostrae. Amen.[size=2][font=Arial]

To hear Schubert’s version of the “Ave Maria” sung brings me to tears.
*[/size]
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*


#15

When we say “Hail Mary” we are directly quoting Scripture. Read Luke 1:26–56 please read all of it to get the full meaning. Notice Luke 1:28 says “Hail Mary, Full of Grace! The Lord is with you.” Some translations i.e my Catholic convert husband’s dusty Scoffield King J.V,which you might read, says : “Hail, thou who art highly favored, the lord is with thee: blessed art thou among women.” Luke 1:28 KJV If God wanted the Angel Gabriel, his messanger, to greet Mary that way there should be nothing wrong with us greeting her the same way!

The next part of our “Hail Mary prayer” is quoting Mary’s cousin Elisabeth **" And it came to pass that when Elisabeth heard the greeting of Mary, the babe leaped in her womb: and Elisabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit. And she spoke out with a loud voice, and said . ****Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of they womb" ****Luke 1:42 KJV **Now if Elisabeth so was filled with the Holy Spirit that she spoke this with a loud voice, it would be quite Biblical for us to proclaim the same.

The next line of the prayer comes from Elisabeth saying “And why is this granted to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?” Luke 1:43.KJV And so we take from this scripture the line Holy Mary, Mother of God (Lord is used to mean God)

Next please read Mary’s “Magnificat” a beautiful prayer. I want to point out two lines here: “My soul doth magnify the Lord, and my spirit hath rejoiced in God my Savior” Luke 46 KJV and the line**:"For he hath regarded the low estate of his handmaiden for behold from henceforth all generations shall call me blessed.** Luke 1:48KJV

**Now, you might ask why we would ask Mary to pray for us? **Jesus’ first public miracle took place at the Wedding of Cana. Mary asked him to perform his first miracle! **And when they lacked wine the mother of Jesus saith unto him "They have no wine. Jesus saith unto her "Woman what have I to do with thee? Mine hour is not yet come. His mother saith unto the servants Whatever he saith unto you do it. **and so Jesus proceded to turn the water into wine. She urged *her *Saviour and Son to have mercy on the bride and groom at the wedding of Cana and perform a miracle even though "his hour had not yet come.

For a non-Catholic who does not understand the concept of the Communion of Saints, or who rejects the idea that the saints in heaven can pray for us and with us, there is no convincing. Their hearts are hardened to the idea, but for those of us who believe that the Mother of Our Lord’s soul magnifies the Lord, by helping us to have a fuller understanding and relationship with her Son, Jesus Christ, and by being OUR Blessed Mother, whom Jesus gave to us just before His death on the cross, Mary points the way to her Son, instructing us to do everything he saith unto us. She doesn’t want glory for herself, but glory for her Son and the salvation of our souls. It is not necessary to have a devotion to Mary, but how wonderful and beautiful to have the Mother of Christ to pray with us and for us. My relationship with Christ because I imagine him through her eyes, I imagine their relationship as I rear my own children. I try to pattern myself after Mary, made perfect to be the mother of the lamb of God, God’s most perfect creation, a woman full of Grace whose soul magnifies the Lord. A woman who perfectly obeyed and desired the Will of God.

The “Hail Mary” prayer is totally Scriptural.


#16

[quote=JW10631]As pointed out, Catholics, Orthodox, and some Anglicans and Lutherans pray the Hail Mary.

It is in its most beautiful forms in
*español - *
Dios te salve, Maria,
tu eres llena de gracia,
El Señor es contigo!
Bendita tu eres entre toda las mujeres
y bendito es el fruto de tu vientre, Jesus.
Oh, Santa Maria, Madre de Dios,
ora por nosotros pecadores,
ahora y en la hore de nuestra muerte.
Amen.

and nothing beats the original Latin -
Ave Maria, gratia plena
Dominus tecum
Benedicta tu in mulieribus,
et benedictus fructus ventris tui, Jesus.
Sancta Maria, Mater Dei
Ora pro nobis peccatoribus
nunc et hora mortis nostrae. Amen.[font=Arial]

To hear Schubert’s version of the “Ave Maria” sung brings me to tears.


[/font]**
**
[/quote]

I think it sounds best in Italian :wink:


#17

[quote=tuopaolo]I think it sounds best in Italian :wink:
[/quote]

Here is what Mary actually heard - the words from the lips of the Archangel, in Aramaic…

Shlom lekh Mariam,

Maliath taibootho,

moran a’amekh,

mbarakhto at bneshey,

wambarakhoo feero dabkharsekh.

There should be a sound file of this somewhere on the Web?


#18

I use Anglican prayer beads (configured differently from a rosary)… but evidently, John Wesley (founder of Methodism) carried a rosary (click here).

O+


#19

All right for Mr Wesley!!
I keep my rosary with me, too. I have never been able to :confused: fathom why anyone would object to asking Jesus’ mother to pray for them when they have no problem asking their own mothers for the same…


#20

An interesting fact about the Hail Mary…As you recite the words you inhale and exhale at a correct rhythm. Anyone in a panic situation automaticly finds themselves calming down because of this fact. Neat Eh

st julie


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