Opponents of health-care law turn to faith-based nonprofits to cover medical expenses


#1

Susan Tucker is one of millions of Americans who dislike the health law and want nothing to do with it. But the 54-year-old Venice, Fla., homemaker took her opposition a step further: She opted out.

Tucker dropped the private health plan she had carried for more than a decade and joined Christian Healthcare Ministries, a faith-based nonprofit in which members pool their money to pay for one another’s medical needs — and promise to adhere to biblical values, such as attending church and abstaining from sex outside marriage.

“When all this came up with the ACA, I just realized I don’t want to be a part of any of this,” said Tucker, who views the Affordable Care Act as the government meddling in her personal health care. The Christian Healthcare program is not as comprehensive as insurance — she has to pay for her preventive care, for example — but the monthly payment of $150 can’t be beat, she said.

washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/opting-out-of-obamacare/2014/06/05/126e03de-df7e-11e3-810f-764fe508b82d_story.html


#2

In Feburary a reporter said Medi-share has about ‘75000 members’ and ‘$825 million has been shared among its members’

katv.com/story/24782483/christian-families-in-ar-pooling-their-money-to-pay-for-each-others-medical-bills


#3

QUOTE: “When all this came up with the ACA, I just realized I don’t want to be a part of any of this,” said Tucker, who views the Affordable Care Act as the government meddling in her personal health care. The Christian Healthcare program is not as comprehensive as insurance — she has to pay for her preventive care, for example — but the monthly payment of $150 can’t be beat, she said.

In my humble opinion, the most important component of health insurance is preventative care because the goal of preventative care is to promote health and to avoid the more expensive and painfully impactful treatment presented by more serious health issues. Health insurance that does not pay for preventative care creates a disincentive for people to seek preventative care for themselves and for their children. It is easy to justify avoiding the cost and inconvenience of going to the doctor when one is not feeling ill.

Secondly, the view that The Affordable Care Act is “the government meddling in her personal health care” is completely false. The ACA does basically two things:

  1. The ACA institutes new regulations for insurance companies that extend the same sort of benefits to people who buy individual policies as the benefits (such as preventative care) that are routinely available to people who have group policies negotiated by an employer - as well as new benefits such as the opportunity for parents to keep their adult children on their insurance policy for a longer time. None of which has to do with anyone’s “personal health care.”

  2. The ACA creates a market place where individuals purchase health insurance from private insurance companies. Just like group insurance, the market place has open enrollment periods during which individuals can buy insurance and change insurance companies. Again, the market place does not impact any individual’s “personal health care.”

Ironically, those of us who have the benefits of a group policy provided by our employer are familiar, comfortable, and appreciative of the benefits that The ACA intends to extend to everyone who does not have opportunity to participate in a group policy.


#4

Don’t you think that people who have lost their health care plans and their doctors because of effects from the ACA would disagree with you that about the effects of the ACA?


#5

I don’t know how these folks will ultimately view the ACA. But I do know that if they value their health, they will avail themselves of preventative care.


#6

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