Order of books in the new testament

Can anyone tell me who was responsible for putting the books of the bible in the order they currently appear? Where they always in this order or have they changed. What about the old testament?

Thanks

Most likely the councils that assembled the Bible put them together in chronological order.

An excellent question! I’d like to know the answer too.

I was just reading something and it mentioned in two sentences "Council of Trent (1545-1563). If anyone can confirm this, please do so. Thanks in advance.

The Synoptic Gospels (Mathew, Mark, Luke) are in the order that early church thought they had been written. In fact it is most likely that Mark was written first. Mark was secretary to St. Peter in Rome and so it is reasonable to assume that what we have in Mark is the reminisces of St. Peter himself shortly before his martyrdom in 64 or 65 AD. John was written, at the latest by 90 AD and was the last Gospel.

In fact Galatians (I think) was the first written contribution to what would become the NT, in 49 AD. With the question mark of Hebrews (which is not by St. Paul) as the exception, all the Epistles were collected and were being disseminated among the early Christian churches by 70 AD.

Revelations (or Apocalypse) was written and being distributed before 110 AD.

So the Canon, with a few small exceptions, was complete within the first 100 years of the Christian Church. The next 100 or so years saw additions and exceptions but the Canon was prettty fixed before the first Church Council at Niceae in 325. It was confirmed at Hippo in 397 (I think).

Because Luther and the other Protestant ‘reformers’ cast doubt on several books of the OT and the NT, Holy Mother Church in Council at Trent felt it necessary to reaffirm what the Canon was but it was not changed or altered from what it had always been since before the time of St. Jerome.

[quote=Cockney Clive]Because Luther and the other Protestant ‘reformers’ cast doubt on several books of the OT and the NT, Holy Mother Church in Council at Trent felt it necessary to reaffirm what the Canon was but it was not changed or altered from what it had always been since before the time of St. Jerome.
[/quote]

Don’t forget Erasmus, the great Cajetan, and the papal legate Cardinal Seripando- This cardinal was “aligned with the leaders of a minority that was outstanding for its theological scholarship” at Trent according to Catholic historian Hubert Jedin. All these Catholic men expressed “doubt” on particular books.

Regards, James Swan
ntrmin.org/rccorner-reformation.htm

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