Ordinary form private masses

Can the Ordinary Form Mass be said in private by priests? If so what are the rubrics?

Yes. I believe this can be found in the GIRM Chapter IV, section III.


which can be found about 2/3 of the way down here:

usccb.org/liturgy/current/chapter4.shtml#sect3

If by privately you mean only with the priest, no.

Chapter IV, section 3 of the quoted document is “Mass at which Only One Minister Participates.” That means there is a second person there to make the responses. There seems to be no provision for Mass for one.

If I’d actually read the document I would have seen this:

  1. Mass should not be celebrated without a minister or at least one of the faithful, except for a just and reasonable cause. In this case, the greetings, the introductory or explanatory remarks (monitiones), and the blessing at the end of Mass are omitted.

Yes.

Others have already provided links to the rubrics.

Could you provide a source for your information?

Quote from: **[FONT=Times New Roman][size=5]
[LEFT]CEREMONIES OF THE MODERN ROMAN RITE[/LEFT]
[/size][/FONT][LEFT]Chapter 9 Other Forms of Mass[/LEFT]
*Mass without a Congregation

**[FONT=Times New Roman][LEFT]Celebrating Alone[/LEFT]
*[LEFT]538. When a priest celebrates Mass alone, he will arrange the books and vessels on the altar. The above ceremonial is observed, however, he omits the acclamation after the Consecration, and he is even supposed to omit all the greetings and the blessing.
[FONT=Times New Roman] [/LEFT]
[/FONT][LEFT]539. According to the *General Instruction, *a priest may celebrate Mass alone only “in serious necessity”.[FONT=Times New Roman] [/FONT]However, the 1983 *Code of Canon Law *describes this in a more moderate and pastoral way as “a good and reasonable cause”.[FONT=Times New Roman] [/FONT]The devout wish of a priest to maintain his personal practice of daily Mass is a good and reasonable cause, which is serious enough to merit special mention in the Code of Canon Law: “Indeed, daily celebration is earnestly recommended, because, even if it should not be possible to have the faithful present, it is an action of Christ and of the Church in which priests fulfill their principal role.”[FONT=Times New Roman][/LEFT]
[/FONT]
[/FONT]

this reminds me of the Chaldean priest who is our substitute priest. he told a story where he went to the church to celebrate mass and wasn’t expecting anyone to be there. in fact, he told his parishoners not to come to church because there was a war ongoing (he’s from Iraq) so their lives were in danger. but a young boy came anyway, so he didn’t actually celebrate mass alone

usccb.org/liturgy/current/chapter4.shtml#sect3

I assume you mean section III. of that page, “Mass at which Only One Minister Participates”? Since the GIRM is a big document, it’s helpful to reference it by paragraph number whenever possible.

As it turns out, the first three paragraphs of that section state:
252. At a Mass celebrated by a priest with only one minister to assist him and to make the responses, the rite of Mass with a congregation is followed (cf. above, nos. 120-169) the minister saying the people’s parts as appropriate.

  1. If, however, the minister is a deacon, he performs his proper duties (cf. above, nos. 171-186) and likewise carries out the other parts, that is, those of the people.

254. Mass should not be celebrated without a minister or at least one of the faithful, except for a just and reasonable cause. In this case, the greetings, the introductory or explanatory remarks (monitiones), and the blessing at the end of Mass are omitted.
So it is permissible for a priest to celebrate Mass without anyone else present, provided he has a “just and reasonable cause.”

YES, a priest must celebrate mass ever day, with or without people.
most priests have a oratory where they can celebrate mass everyday
even if they are alone. some rectorys have altars for priests to use incase they are not holding public mass.

Must?:confused:

I have never heard that is an absolute requirement, (at least since VII, I know that pre-Vii the rules were a little different) more so of an ideal,
can you give me some reference for this,
because if this is the case, many of the priests in my diocese are not
fulfilling their “requirements.”

Actually, it’s not a “must” but rather a strong recommendation:

Can. 904 Remembering always that in the mystery of the eucharistic sacrifice the work of redemption is exercised continually, priests are to celebrate frequently; indeed, daily celebration is recommended earnestly since, even if the faithful cannot be present, it is the act of Christ and the Church in which priests fulfill their principal function.

I’ll take that as a no, you can’t provide a source for your original answer.

In this age of webcams and tv cameras, sometimes we have no idea how widespread our audience is. Where my father passed away in a hospital last year, they had noon mass available to watch in all the rooms. It was most valuable.

Good point.

Do you have any examples of what such a just and reasonable cause is? Or how frequently such a seeming rare exception is invoked?

You’re welcome to interpret or misinterpret my response as you see fit.

Ok then. Explain it to us please:

How do you reconcile this post of yours

With your explanation of that post, here in #11
forums.catholic.com/showpost.php?p=6701913&postcount=11

Which source reads:
254. Mass should not be celebrated without a minister or at least one of the faithful, except for a just and reasonable cause. In this case, the greetings, the introductory or explanatory remarks (monitiones), and the blessing at the end of Mass are omitted.

Since the “source” you use to justify your first post contradicts your first post.

I’m just not seeing it. Please explain.

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