Origin of the Universe


#1

I attended a lecture by Dr. Stephen W. Hawking on November 7, 2005 in San Jose. His spiritual presence seemed to surround and captivate the audience as his eyes pierced through eyelids that gently flickered to the sound of his computerized voice announcing, “God chose, for reasons we cannot know, the moment of creation, but it began 15 billion years ago when all galaxies were clustered.”

As I sat in row seven, seat thirty-seven, I soon realized that the wheel chair carrying Hawking’s frail, listless body contained one of the most brilliant minds of the 20th and 21st century, a soul’s lifetime journey into the origin of the Universe. Stephen Hawking’s heartfelt proclamation to us, “We are quantum fluctions in the universe.” And, he briefly mentioned that ‘extra dimensions are curled up like a donut’!

After his lecture, a very young girl appeared in the audience carrying a fresh bouquet of red roses with sprigs of baby breath. She proceeded to walk-up the stairs onto the stage then placed the flowers onto the lap of Stephen Hawking. It was a moving experience which he immediately responded to her gesture by saying, “God bless you.” Everyone stood up and applauded!

What are quantum fluctions? Any information regarding his comment ‘extra dimensions are curled up like a donut’ would also be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


#2

Quantum Fluctuations
Vacuum fluctuations are random and unpredictable oscillations in small regions of space. Where vacuum fluctions give rise to an instantainously high value, energy being momentarily stolen from adjacent space and then returned, virtual particles and virtual antiparticles, are formed. As energy cannot be created out of nothing one is positive and one is negative. Normally as the field fluctuates the positive and negative particles seek out and annihilate each other. Electromagnetic vacuum fluctions give rise to virtual photons and gravitional vacuum fluctuations give rise to virtual gravitons.

As to the donut thing…go here nap.edu/html/oneuniverse/frontiers_186-187.html

I prefer to just say I’m a dude created by God. I’m too simple to worry about how He did it :slight_smile:


#3

What a positive, lovely experience to have with such a great scientist and philosopher. It seems to me that the truly brilliant people in science see the Creator better than lesser minds in their fields. Louis Pasteur was the same as well as Einstein. They don’t let their minds be clouded with false ideas–it’s a big waste of their precious time and energy for one thing and unproductive for another. Bravo for Stephen Hawkings and all who see the transcendent within God’s natural universe.


#4

[quote=wildleafblower] …What are quantum fluctions? Any information regarding his comment ‘extra dimensions are curled up like a donut’ would also be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
[/quote]

This is what you get when science cannot accept observation after observation that earth is at the centerof the universe. Science gets more and more complex to avoid having to accept evidence that a God, to which we must answer, exists.

See this: Is Geocentrism Possible?

Mark
www.veritas-catholic.blogspot.com


#5

[quote=wildleafblower]“God chose, for reasons we cannot know, the moment of creation, but it began 15 billion years ago when all galaxies were clustered.”
[/quote]

Question - If “all the galaxies were clustered” then how could this have been the moment of creation? Creation means making out of nothing. Galaxies are not nothing. Therefore, if there were already galaxies to cluster, creation had already happened. If I am misunderstanding something, I am sure someone will correct me.


#6

[quote=Joan M]Question - If “all the galaxies were clustered” then how could this have been the moment of creation? Creation means making out of nothing. Galaxies are not nothing. Therefore, if there were already galaxies to cluster, creation had already happened. If I am misunderstanding something, I am sure someone will correct me.
[/quote]

The idea is that creation was a localized phenominon. So when all the matter (contained in the galaxies) was created, the galaxies all must have been co-located. After creation, the galaxies moved apart, to where they are now. Thus, we can determine the time when creation happened by asking when, based on the motion of the galaxies, they would have been clustered.


#7

[quote=Catholic2003]The idea is that creation was a localized phenominon. So when all the matter (contained in the galaxies) was created, the galaxies all must have been co-located. After creation, the galaxies moved apart, to where they are now. Thus, we can determine the time when creation happened by asking when, based on the motion of the galaxies, they would have been clustered.
[/quote]

Only if we know the speed of separation. It may not have been constant.

The initial expansion was of radiation. Only after expansion had cooled things down a bit could matter be formed.

While one might take the speed of light as an upper limit on the velocity of the expansion, it is not clear that one can take that as constant throughout all time - and one doesn’t have a standard to define constant against.


#8

A heartfelt thank you to everyone! :slight_smile:

"After leaving the Institute of Astronomy in 1973 Stephen Hawking came to the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, and since 1979 has held the post of Lucasian Professor of Mathematics. The chair was founded in 1663 with money left in the will of the Reverend Henry Lucas, who had been the Member of Parliment for the University. It was first held by Isaac Barrow, and then in 1669 by Isaac Newton.

“Stephen Hawking has worked on the basic laws which govern the universe. With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes. These results indicated it was necessary to unify General Relativeity with Quantum Theory, the other great Scientific development of the first half of the 20th Century. One consequence of such a unification that he discovered was that black holes should not be completely black, but should emit radiation and eventurally evaporate and disappear. Another conjecture is that the universe has no edge or boundary in imaginary time. This would imply that the way the universe began was completely determined by the laws of science.”

The above mentioned quotes were taken from the brochure handed out to attendees of the Hawking lecture on November 7, 2005.

What’s imaginary time? The Big Bang? We have to understand this before knowing where we came from. Right? And I should mention that Hawking is agnostic. Scientists don’t ask ‘why’ only ‘how’. Am I correct?

My thought runs in this direction regarding Hawking’s comment, “We are quantum fluctions in the universe.”

I’m the highest power of radiant energy in a sea of radiation that will forever permeate the entirety of the Universe. I shall never cease to exist, only travel to another dimension and take up residence there in my original form if I so desire. I have the power! All that “I am” here on Earth will be found there. :smiley:

Could this be a fair observation based on his statement?


#9

*"Stephen Hawking has worked on the basic laws which govern the universe. With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes.*Lest there be misunderstanding here, it was a Jesuit priest/mathematician, George LeMaitre of Belgium, who *first *postulated evidence for an expanding universe (what later became know as the Big Bang).


#10

[quote=Gilbert Keith]*"Stephen Hawking has worked on the basic laws which govern the universe. With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes.*Lest there be misunderstanding here, it was a Jesuit priest/mathematician, George LeMaitre of Belgium, who *first *postulated evidence for an expanding universe (what later became know as the Big Bang).
[/quote]

Thanks Gilbert for your input. :slight_smile: Lemaitre’s Primeval Atom Hypothesis (1927) helped in the Big Bang Theory? Does a hypothesis have postulated evidence or only a theory?

pathlights.com/ce_encyclopedia/02-star9.htm#Lemaitre

Lemaitre was ‘president of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences at Rome. Lemaitre’s theoretical ideas concerning the origin of the Universe were published in 1927, when he was 31, but the paper was largely unnoticed until the astrophysicist Arthur Eddington (1882-1944) called attention to it much later’. Are theoretical ideas used in a hypothesis and theory?

howcomyoucom.com/Universe/evolutionofgalax.htm

Here is more information about Stephen Hawking.

bbc.co.uk/cambridgeshire/science/2003/10/stephen_hawking.shtml

Thanks


#11

[quote=Gilbert Keith]*"Stephen Hawking has worked on the basic laws which govern the universe. With Roger Penrose he showed that Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity implied space and time would have a beginning in the Big Bang and an end in black holes.*Lest there be misunderstanding here, it was a Jesuit priest/mathematician, George LeMaitre of Belgium, who *first *postulated evidence for an expanding universe (what later became know as the Big Bang).
[/quote]

Note that the Big Bang was not the only theory for an expanding universe. I think it was Hoyle who proposed an eternal, infinite universe which was expanding. He postulated a continuing generation of matter which kept the density of matter constant in that universe.

In the fifties it was the universe according to Hoyle [continuous generation] vs. the universe according to Boyle [Big Bang] as I recall.


#12

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