Origins of the word 'mass'

Conventional understanding is that ‘mass’ comes from the dismissal at the end of mass (the Latin for mass is missa). I find it strange to name something after the point of conclusion when the mass is no more.

It may be more appropriate that the dismissal refers to the dismissal of catechumens after the Liturgy of the Word, as is currently practiced by the Eastern Rites. Dismissing the catechumens means that the real part of the mass of the faithful now begins.

Am I correct?

Ignore idiots like me.

Sorry, I thought that it is the word Eucharist that means thanksgiving.

Anyway, my question was on the origin of the word, rather than the meaning.:tiphat:

Oh derp. I think you’re right. Forgive me…I’m stupid.

Not likely otherwise you wouldn’t be on this forum!!:o

Hmm… the ‘World Cup’ is named after the thing that is won at the point of conclusion when the soccer tournament is no more; and no one seems to object to that name… :shrug:

It may be more appropriate that the dismissal refers to the dismissal of catechumens after the Liturgy of the Word, as is currently practiced by the Eastern Rites. Dismissing the catechumens means that the real part of the mass of the faithful now begins.

Am I correct?

Ouch… I can’t say that I think you are. After all, your argument seems to be saying that the Liturgy of the Word isn’t a “real part of the Mass”… :eek:

In the pre-Vatican days, it was clear that the Liturgy of the Word was definitely secondary to the Liturgy of the Eucharist. I am not sure how it was in the early days of the Church. After all, the Liturgy of the Word was then modeled after the Jewish service.

You can see the vestiges of this when the Liturgy of the Eucharist is referred to as the Liturgy of the Faithful, being exclusive for only the baptised to be present.

Anyhow, the parallel with the World Cup is not exact. A more exact parallel would be to name the entire World Cup campaign after the closing ceremony.

I guess the precursor to the word ‘Mass’ would be ‘liturgy’, from the Greek word, ‘leitourgia’, meaning, ‘the work of the people.’

I don’t know if we will ever know exactly, but one of the points of the Mass is to prepare us to go forth to be disciples, to spread the gospel. In that way missa could refer to not a single moment in the Mass, but rather its function in preparing to send us forth to proclaim the gospel.

Mass comes from the latin word “missa” as others correctly pointed out.

Missa (fem. past. part. of mittĕre) is a verb it means “to send” so in the missa we are prepared to be sent!

WHERE?

To convert the world, be like the Apostles.
It was so since the beginning of the Church that early Christians would come together on Sunday to learn the Catholic faith and be prepared to be disciples and Apostles of Jesus.
At the end and since the VII Century the formula “Ite missa est” was used customarily.

Peace :thumbsup:

I guess we can think of it as being related to the Latinate word, mission.

Interesting topic…

I always assumed that “Mass” was connected with “-mas” as in “Christ-mas” which I thought meant, “feast”…But maybe I’m way off…

Peace
James

It is connected but the other way round. Christmas means Christ’s mass.

OK - but see - since this is the "feast of the nativity of Christ - my natural assumption was Christ’s mass = Christ’s feast…After all, that is what we call these special days now…feast days…

Like I said…It was my assumption…guess I was wrong…:shrug:

Peace
James

The Latin word ‘missa’ means ‘sending’,

The Eucharistic Liturgy concludes with the words “Ite, Missa est” translated directly as 'Go, it is sent"

Or the Christ Mass, in much the same was as Candlemas is the Candle Mass

It seems that way. Very good, actually. :thumbsup:

Also the word “dismissed” comes pretty close as well, although it may have a much weaker connotation nowadays.

mitto, mittere, misi, missus - send, cast, put
dimitto, dimittere, dimisi, dimissus - send away, release, permit

Other forms:
admitto, amitto, emitto, permitto, remitto, submitto

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