Orthodox Catholic Protestant


#1

, many Orthodox I know classify Protestants simply as disobedient Catholics.

So how do Prostestants see their relationship with Orthodoxy and Catholicism?


#2

my Baptist friend believes that the Catholic Church went astray early on.


#3

She is wrong to think like that. Those who were lead astray were condemned as heretics by the Church Councils. She should get her facts strange.

Second, Jesus promised the Church will be protected from error. “The Gates of Hell shall not prevail against it.”


#4

Some Fundamentalist Protestants I know think Gregory The Great was the first Pope who asserted the claim of papal primacy, and that it was the Roman Church that broke from Orthodoxy in 1054 A.D.

Where as Orthodoxy began through Emperor Constantine at the Council of Nicea in 325 A.D. which then rapidly fell into apostasy and assimilated pagan rituals and customs.

Though there are other scenerios and conspiracy theories of how Orthodoxy or Catholicism came to be, but the definitive break from their Protestant brand of “true Christianity” is commonly believed to be at Nicea.

All a bunch of hooey of course…


#5

The truth is St. Ignatius of Antioch first called Jesus Christ’s Church Catholic in 107 A.D. He wrote, ** "You must all follow the lead of the bishop, as **Jesus Christ **followed that of the Father; follow the presbytery as you would the Apostles; reverence the deacons as you would God’s commandment. Let no one do anything touching the Church, apart from the bishop. Let that celebration of the Eucharist be considered valid which is held under the bishop or anyone to whom he has committed it. Where the bishop appears, there let the people be, just as where **Jesus Christ is, there is the Catholic Church. It is not permitted without authorization from the bishop either to baptize or to hold an agape; but whatever he approves is also pleasing to God. Thus everything you do will be proof against danger and valid."

St. Ignatius was taught by St. John, the Apostle, and St. John the Apostle was taught by Jesus Christ and knew him personally. He can’t be wrong. I don’t think John would teach Ignatius any erroneous doctrines.

This Epistle of St. Ignatius to the Smyrnaeans predates Emperor Constantine in 325 A.D. and predates the East-West Schism in 1054 A.D.

Before 1054 A.D, the Christian Church is Catholic.


#6

Of interest up until recently the US Army had no special category for Orthodox soldiers.

On their dog-tags soldiers had “P” for Protestant, “C” for Catholic and “H” for Hebrew (or “J” for Jew). The US Army gave a “P” to all Orthodox soldiers, counting us as Protestants!


#7

That is shameful. THe Army should had Othodox Christians.

You may have to discuss it with your local Chaplain…


#8

Generally Protestants have never heard of the Orthodox Church. If they have then they think that it an old church that has some interesting meditation prayers like the Jesus Prayer that can help you pray. I am speeking from personal experiance. I grew up in a Methodist family and became Catholic about 2 years ago. My brother is going to be confirmed into the Orthodox Church this spring. My parents are Methodist and are confused about us joining a pagan religion. They are more tolerant of my brother because they never heard of the Orthodox Church, but they do not like him praying to Mary. As for me…well lets just say that they do not like the Catholic Church. They have been supporting my brother and my descisions. They went to my confirmation and even bought me a rosary. Also they are going to my brother’s confirmation. Well that is my take on the situation.

It looks like my family could sit down and have a Eucemenical Council :slight_smile:

Pax Cristi


#9

I think that they do now, but it’s only in the last few years. Maybe they just thought that anyone Christian, and not Catholic *must be *Protestant.

PS, I’m not in America. But I thank you for your concern

Though if I was, I might contact one of these… :slight_smile:
goarmy.com/ProfileDetail.do?dir=/_res/xml/chaplain/&xml=bio_list.xml&fw=chaplain&sn=robb&profile=


#10

I was always taught that the Orthodox broke off…if they (Protestants) taught that Rome left, then the Protestants would have to claim that the Reformers are irrelevent and the reasons for their leaving are not important. It’s either that, or Restorationism, because they are certainly not Orthodox.

I’m 99% sure they do have Orthodox dogtags now, but I could call and ask, and they’d send a free t-shirt! :smiley:

Prayers and petitions,
Alexius:cool:


#11

That’s better than here. When I was a boy and wrote a letter to our army they sent me a few stickers.


#12

Well i only got to know the Easten churches from this website. To me Orthodox and Catholic are almost the same.:smiley:


#13

On the surface we may well be, but as far as doctrines of salvation Catholics and Protestants are two sides of the same coin … both believe in ‘satisfaction’ of God, only they differ in how you go about it. Protestants have a once-in-a-lifetime declaration of faith, and Catholics have a life-time of pedalling the penitential cycle


#14

Indeed, and Protestants typically overlook that all too Catholic sounding epistle from 107 A.D.(just 80 years after Christ’s death), the Church couldn’t of apostasized that quickly couldn’t it? Or they merely contend it was a post-Constantine papist forgery, in which case where is the evidence?


#15

But Protestants claim it was also the Orthodox who broke away from their type of Christianity around 325 A.D. at Nicea. That is if they know Eastern Orthodoxy exists, and how it differs from Roman Catholicism.


#16

American Protestants generally have even less of a clue about Orthodoxy than they have of Catholicism.

Here’s a quote from an article from the other side of the fence ie what Orthodox thought of Lutheranism:

Thus, it is extremely noteworthy that a group of Lutheran theologians from the University of Tübingen in Germany during the last quarter of the sixteenth century would initiate a dialogue with – and even seek approval from – the Patriarch of Constantinople, leader of the Orthodox Christians under Ottoman oppression in the East.

stpaulsirvine.org/html/lutheran.htm


#17

i know that he :stuck_out_tongue: is wrong…we’ve had 2-3 hour long discussions on various topics…we’ve never discussed in length tho, exactly when he thinks the C23 went astray.

Your training has been correct. If you draw a “family tree” of all Christian denominations, which each branch turning at an angle corresponding with the degree that it veers away from the early church, the C23 will be the only straight line you draw.


#18

It is interesting that the very criticisms of Catholicism by some of the sects, also applies to Orthodoxy. Yet the Catholic Church gets a real pasting, but Orthodoxy [by the grace of God] doesn’t even get a mention.

They can’t say ‘it is because we have the Pope’ as Orthodox have the Patriach :wink:


#19

Where does Ignatius mention the Pope?:confused:

In point of fact he notes that there’s no office higher than that of bishop.:thumbsup:


#20

Well, not really. The role of the patriarch in Orthodoxy is almost nothing like that of the pope in Catholicism.


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