Orthodox?


#1

I see this term thrown around a lot on this forum, and it occured to me that every time I see it, I’m confused by it. When did there become “orthodox” Catholics? Either you’re following the Catechism or you’re not…you’re either a practicing Catholic or you’re not. What’s this orthodox stuff all about? Is that the new way of saying “Catholic?” If so, what is everyone else? Catholic in name only, with a totally different way of living life that’s contrary to the church (thus not Catholic at all)? If being a Catholic means following the Catechism, and following that Catechism makes you “orthodox,” then either you’re orthodox or you’re not Catholic.

Enlighten me, please…


#2

I once heard of a Mass where the priest put on whiteface and clown makeup. He wore ordinary vestments, but with a clown head. Now, this is an insult to the dignity of the Mass, but as far as I know, there is no Canon Law or Magesterial teaching which says a priest cannot make himself up like a clown. So there is nothing *prima facia *which would invalidate such a Mass (though, I suppose, one may wonder about the priest’s intent), but I would HARDLY consider such a perfectly valid and licit Mass to be “orthodox” simply because it didn’t violate Canon Law or GIRM or Magesterial teaching.

There are many such practices going on today which “push the envelope” of proprietary, but are not technically improper. Many people use the term “orthodox” in the sense of excluding such practices.


#3

I suppose there’s not “law” that you can’t look like a clown, but there is a “law” about taking the focus away from the Eucharist. I would think something like that would fall in to a number of different legal categories, even if it is not spelled out “don’t dress like a clown.”

I see where you’re going with that, though. I guess I’m fortunate in that I"ve never experienced such a thing.


#4

[quote=DavidFilmer]I once heard of a Mass where the priest put on whiteface and clown makeup. He wore ordinary vestments, but with a clown head. Now, this is an insult to the dignity of the Mass, but as far as I know, there is no Canon Law or Magesterial teaching which says a priest cannot make himself up like a clown. So there is nothing *prima facia *which would invalidate such a Mass (though, I suppose, one may wonder about the priest’s intent), but I would HARDLY consider such a perfectly valid and licit Mass to be “orthodox” simply because it didn’t violate Canon Law or GIRM or Magesterial teaching.

There are many such practices going on today which “push the envelope” of proprietary, but are not technically improper. Many people use the term “orthodox” in the sense of excluding such practices.
[/quote]

The only place I’ve heard of clown liturgies is in the ELCA (and I only know of this one because my neighbor invited me to one where she [not even a pastor] was supposed to be the clown). Never heard of one purported except by schismatic Catholic groups promoting themselves as the “true” or “remnant” church.


#5

MamaSusie, you’re right on the money about being orthodox.
As for clown masses, unfortunately there have been several of them in Catholic churches in communion with Rome, and that’s a rotten shame.
Love, Jaypeeto3


#6

[quote=MamaSusie]I see this term thrown around a lot on this forum, and it occured to me that every time I see it, I’m confused by it. When did there become “orthodox” Catholics? Either you’re following the Catechism or you’re not…you’re either a practicing Catholic or you’re not. What’s this orthodox stuff all about? Is that the new way of saying “Catholic?”
[/quote]

Little “o” orthodox simply means adhering to the accepted or traditional and established faith and adhering to the Catholic faith as expressed by Ecumenical Councils and Magisterial teachings.

The term “orthodox” is usually thrown around on this forum to help members find good parishes, books, websites, etc. This forum was extremely helpful for me to find orthodox Catholic resources because (early on in my journey to Catholicism) I had ran into several Catholic websites that protested more things about the Catholic faith than many Protestants do (both arch-traditionalist and arch-liberal). By finding orthodox resources you can discern which positions are in line with the Magisterium.


#7

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