Other catholic churches and rites


#1

I hate to be critical of the search function but its sometimes pretty hard to find things.
I know that in the not too distant past some posters gave a list of all the Catholic Churches which submit to the Pope and also a list of the different rites.
If someone could kindly list them again I will copy, paste and save them.
thanks


#2

Go here


#3

[quote=Hans A.]Go here
[/quote]

Thanks.


#4

Better yet, go here, where you will see a list on our Eastern Catholic forum that is significantly more detailed and accurate than the one at ewtn.

Joe


#5

[quote=Joe Monahan]Better yet, go here, where you will see a list on our Eastern Catholic forum that is significantly more detailed and accurate than the one at ewtn.

Joe
[/quote]

Is there a similar link for the Western churches? That was very informative and incredibly detailed, thanks.


#6

[quote=MonkeyTape]Is there a similar link for the Western churches? That was very informative and incredibly detailed, thanks.
[/quote]

It is my understanding (and my “understanding” is VERY limited) that there is only one Western Church, the Roman or Latin Rite. All of the other Rites are Eastern Rites. Please, someone, correct me if I’m wrong.


#7

[quote=joshua_b]It is my understanding (and my “understanding” is VERY limited) that there is only one Western Church, the Roman or Latin Rite. All of the other Rites are Eastern Rites. Please, someone, correct me if I’m wrong.
[/quote]

EWTN lists the following Western rites. It gives a bit of info on each, but one of these previous posts on Eastern Rites had much more detailed info. I just wonder if there is a similar list of western rites.
• Roman - The overwhelming majority of Latin Catholics and of Catholics in general. Patriarch of this and the other Roman Rites is the Bishop of Rome.
• Mozarabic - The Rite of the Iberian peninsula (Spain and Portugal) known from at least the 6th century, but probably with roots to the original evangelization. Beginning in the 11th century it was generally replaced by the Roman Rite, although it has remained the Rite of the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Toledo, Spain, and six parishes which sought permission to adhere to it. Its celebration today is generally semi-private.
• Ambrosian - The Rite of the Archdiocese of Milan, Italy, thought to be of early origin and probably consolidated, but not originated, by St. Ambrose. Pope Paul VI was from this Roman Rite. It continues to be celebrated in Milan, though not by all parishes.
• Bragan - Rite of the Archdiocese of Braga, the Primatial See of Portugal, it derives from the 12th century or earlier. It continues to be of occasional use.
• Dominican - Rite of the Order of Friars Preacher (OP), founded by St. Dominic in 1215.
• Carmelite - Rite of the Order of Carmel, whose modern foundation was by St. Berthold c.1154.
• Carthusian - Rite of the Carthusian Order founded by St. Bruno in 1084.


#8

[quote=MonkeyTape]Is there a similar link for the Western churches? That was very informative and incredibly detailed, thanks.
[/quote]

There is one Western Church. Which is primarily Romen or Latin Rite. There as listed below some limited use liturgical Rites still around, generally only in specific parts of the world.


#9

The Catholic Faith is composed of 22 Churches spread across 6 Rites: [list]*]Alexandrean Rite
- Coptic Catholic Church
- Ethiopian (& Eritrean) Catholic Church

*] Antiochene Rite
- Syriac Catholic Church
- Syro-Malabarese Catholic Church
- Syro-Malankarese Catholic Church

*] Armenian Rite
- Armenian Catholic Church

*] Byzantine Rite
- Albanian Catholic Church
- Belarusan Catholic Church
- Bulgarian Catholic Church
- Croatian Catholic Church
- Georgian Catholic Church
- Greek Catholic Church
- Hungarian Catholic Church
- Italo-Greco-Albanian Catholic Church
- Melkite Catholic Church
- Russian Catholic Church
- Romanian Catholic Church
- Ruthenian Catholic Church
- Slovakian Catholic Church
- Ukrainian Catholic Church

*] Latin Rite
- Roman Catholic Church

*] Maronite Rite
- Maronite Catholic Church[/list]


#10

[quote=Sir Knight]The Catholic Faith is composed of 22 Churches spread across 6 Rites:

[list]
*]Antiochian Rite - East
[/list]

  • Syro-Malabarese Catholic Church
  • Chaldean Catholic church

[list]
*]Antiochene Rite - West
[/list]

  • Syriac Catholic Church
    • Syro-Malankarese Catholic Church
    • Maronite Catholic Church
      [/quote]

Just a small note, and it is a dabateable one to be sure, but I believe the Maronite church is best listed as part of the Antiochian rite rather than a class of it’s own.

It has changed a lot over the years because of it’s long contact with the church of the ‘Franks’ since the Crusades but I believe that it still uses the Liturgy of Saint James in common with the others.

The Armenian church originated from the Antiochian/Byzantine church in Cappadocia, some would list it as a distant variant of the Byzantine rite but I think it is so unique it is best left as you show it.

I have added the Chaldean Catholic church, which is East Syrian and centered in Iraq (Mesopotamia). It was once part of the “Church of the East” which is Nestorian. As a Nestorian church this Tradition had bishops from Arabia to southern China by the seventh century. It is also the mother church of the Syro-Malabar church in Kerala.

The reference thread linked by our brother in Christ Joe Monahan is very comprehensive. The next best source for information is CNEWA and all the work father Roberson has put in there, CNEWA could also use our financial support (shameless plug) for their important work. Let’s all back away from EWTN for info on the Eastern churches, it lacks a great deal. :wink:

+T+
Michael


#11

I may be incorrect but my reference sources list "Maronite " as one of the six rites of the Catholic faith and I just assumed that the “Maronite church” fell under that Rite. If it doesn’t, what church/churches fall under that rite?


#12

[quote=Sir Knight]I may be incorrect but my reference sources list "Maronite " as one of the six rites of the Catholic faith and I just assumed that the “Maronite church” fell under that Rite. If it doesn’t, what church/churches fall under that rite?
[/quote]

I think you are right to assume that, I am expressing an opinion. I believe the rite used by the Maronite church should be classified as West Syrian. The fact that it has adopted many Latinizations should not detract from that in* my *opinion.

Others may disagree. I just don’t think the Maronite usage is so different that it merits being classified separately.

To give you another example, the Anglican churches use a variation of the Latin rite (the big differences come from the Sarum ritual usage). Rome will not recognize it as a separate rite and Orthodox churches see it pretty much the same way. The differences are in* usage*. If the Anglican Church were ever to be accepted into the Catholic Communion (not likely but hey, we can dream) as a particular church similar to the eastern Catholic churches there would be two churches in the west sharing the Roman rite, the only differences being in local usage.

+T+
Michael


#13

[quote=Hesychios]I think you are right to assume that, I am expressing an opinion. I believe the rite used by the Maronite church should be classified as West Syrian. The fact that it has adopted many Latinizations should not detract from that in* my *opinion.

Others may disagree. I just don’t think the Maronite usage is so different that it merits being classified separately.

To give you another example, the Anglican churches use a variation of the Latin rite (the big differences come from the Sarum ritual usage). Rome will not recognize it as a separate rite and Orthodox churches see it pretty much the same way. The differences are in* usage*. If the Anglican Church were ever to be accepted into the Catholic Communion (not likely but hey, we can dream) as a particular church similar to the eastern Catholic churches there would be two churches in the west sharing the Roman rite, the only differences being in local usage.

+T+
Michael
[/quote]

The Maronite Church is from the Antiochian Tradition.


#14

But some sources (even other posts on this board) list it as a seperate Rite.


#15

The Maronite Rite may be listed as its own category for historical reasons. Again my knowledge is very limited in these things, but I believe that the Maronite Rite of the Catholic Church is the ONLY non-western Rite to never have fallen from communion with Rome (seems to me I remember hearing that on Catholic radio…the representative for the Maronites seemed to be very proud of that, so it sort of stuck with me.)


#16

[quote=Sir Knight]But some sources (even other posts on this board) list it as a seperate Rite.
[/quote]

There is a lot of confusion on this topic. Even official sources seem to differ on some points. The Maronite Church is from the Antiochian Tradition. The Maronite Rite is a unique liturgy used only in the Maronite Church. The Maronites never did split from the Bishop of Rome, but hid in the mountains for several hundred years. There is also one other Eastern Catholic Church that never split from the Bishop of Rome.


#17

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]There is a lot of confusion on this topic. Even official sources seem to differ on some points. The Maronite Church is from the Antiochian Tradition. The Maronite Rite is a unique liturgy used only in the Maronite Church. The Maronites never did split from the Bishop of Rome, but hid in the mountains for several hundred years. There is also one other Eastern Catholic Church that never split from the Bishop of Rome.
[/quote]

Hello brother Rich,

I should like to make two observations on these comments (not to be contentious).

The ‘other’ church you refer to is the Italo-Albanian church located only in Italy. But actually for most of that time it was not considered a separate church, but rather part of the Roman Catholic church. It never had anything like a choice to remain with Rome, it happens to be a remnant of earlier Byzantine Christians who existed under Roman Catholic bishops for many centuries. In fact the greater portion of the population of that group were actually Albanian Orthodox refugees who escaped from the Turks across the Adriatic at the time of the union of Florence, so for 500 years they were mostly Orthodox Christians in the Balkans.

The second point I would like to make is that the Maronites are something of a conundrum and most people prefer not to dig too deep here because the story is just too good the way we know it. Basically the Maronite church is cited by many authorities to have been heretical for centuries, starting in the mid first millenium. They definitely were not in communion with other local churches (Melkites) that were in communion with Rome at the time. New Advent has a good article on the subject.

*All competent authorities agree as to the history of the Maronites as far back as the sixteenth century, but beyond that period the unanimity ceases. They themselves assert at once the high antiquity and the perpetual orthodoxy of their nation; but both of these pretensions have constantly been denied by their Christian – even Catholic – rivals in Syria, the Melchites, whether Catholic or Orthodox, the Jacobite Syrians, and the Catholic Syrians.

*The difference seems to be that no formal documents of excommunication between Rome and the Maronites is extant, so they like to claim that they were always in communion.

So then: either the Maronites were heretics in communion with Rome, or the claim that they never broke with Rome is a popular unsubstantiated myth. Either answer is unsatisfactory, we would like to believe that they were never heretics and never broke with Rome, but I am convinced this claim is unsustainable.

+T+
Michael


#18

While the Maronites are of the Antiochene Rite originally - as were the Chaldeans - both are generally classed as representing separate Rites (the Syro-Malabarese are also of the Chaldean Rite).

I would agree with Michael on the matter of the controversy surrounding the claims of the Maronites to have never separated, as well as his remarks with regard to the Italo-Grieco-Albanians.

Someone asked about the Latin Church and its Rites. As Brother Rich offered, the Rites of the Latin Church (other than the Latin Rite itself) are very limited in their celebration. As already noted, these include the three geographically based Rites - Ambrosian, Bragan, and Mozarabic - as well as the Religious Order Rites. There are, in fact, 8 of the latter:

Benedictine Rite
Carmelite Rite (or Rite of the Holy Sepulchre)
Carthusian Rite
Cistercian Rite
Dominican Rite
Franciscan Rite
Norbertine Rite (or Premonstratensian Rite)
Servite Rite

The o/l Catholic Encyclopedia article on “Rites” contains details as to the particulars of each of the Religious Order Rites, although these have changed somewhat as a consequence of Vatican II.

In the Latin Church, there are also (as I’m sure most folks know), an Anglican Usage, as well as the indult for the celebration of the Mass in Latin according to the Tridentine ritual. There is also a very limited indult in existence for the so-called ‘Glagolitic Mass’, which is said in an ancient Slavonic language that is not a vernacular tongue (the term is a misnomer, as ‘Glagolitic’ is the alphabet in which the liturgical service books are written, rather than the tongue in which the Mass is said). Neither the usage nor either of the indults can be properly termed as Rites.

Joe


#19

[quote=Joe Monahan]There are, in fact, 8 of the latter:

Benedictine Rite
Carmelite Rite (or Rite of the Holy Sepulchre)
Carthusian Rite
Cistercian Rite
Dominican Rite
Franciscan Rite
Norbertine Rite (or Premonstratensian Rite)
Servite Rite
[/quote]

I thought that these was classified as “usages” within a ‘church’ :confused:

This is getting really confusing.


#20

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