Our Holy Father speaks of forgiveness and acceptance


#1

With the common misconception going around regarding the Catholic Church and issues such as sexism and homophobia, I’m really hoping our Pope’s humility and compassion can bring to our society a better understanding of the nature of our Catholic faith and the love of Christ. He sticks to Church teaching but emphasizes love, forgiveness, and humility… and of course, our job is to love, not judge. I am so proud to have such a humble and truly loving person as the leader of our Church. :heart:

bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23489702

God Bless Pope Francis!

:extrahappy:


#2

;)Deborah - what a beautiful way you describe dear Pope Francis. He is actively trying to bring the Church to follow the Gospels such as helping the “least of us” and becoming more welcoming to all people. I feel a strong connection to this “missionary to the entire world”, I’m glad to hear there are others here on CAF who feel the same connection.


#3

We love you Pope Francis !


#4

Amen!!!


#5

All this talk of gays being marginalised. What about Christians being marginalised in society for taking a stance against gay marriage? I have seen Christians being labelled bigots, irrelevant, outdated. Is the Pope now suggesting that society is correct in its assessment? The problem with the Catholic Church is that Catholics don’t know where they stand anymore, from abstaining from meat on Fridays to getting to grips with yet another change to the liturgy. “Who am I to judge?” is a rather odd statement, which, incidentally, the Holy Father then goes on to contradict by stating that homosexual acts are sinful.

Best wishes,
Padster


#6

It is not odd at all, and neither is it contradictory. Everything he said was 100% in line with Church teaching. God bless him!

As for the meat on Fridays thing… I have no idea where you pulled that one out of. :shrug:


#7

I stand behind Pope Francis!!


#8

I think your hopes, which are the hopes of us all, are already being realized.

My husband left the Church as he was entering his teens. He hadn’t been to Mass in over 20 years. After Pope Francis, my husbands father came to our state to visit. We live in MI and the in-laws live in FL. The in-laws were only visiting for a few days and booked solid. My husband really wanted to do something with his father. Since his father never misses Mass, my husband was desperate enough to go to Mass just to be with his dad. He was as unhappy with the parish of his childhood as ever. I’d have put good money on him never entering a church again judging by what he said when he came home.

A few weeks later, on a slow news day, my husband was online looking at news of the Pope because he was all over the news and had been for weeks. He read and read about Pope Francis and discovered he very much liked and admired the man. He then called a few Jesuit priests and left messages wanting to talk. The priest who responded was very understanding, helpful, and just all around awesome. So, my husband started attending Mass at his church. Within weeks, the girls joined him and so did I.

If Pope Francis hadn’t been so humble and compassionate I am pretty sure we wouldn’t be attending Mass weekly and would still be living under some misconceptions about the nature of Catholicism.


#9

Praise God!

I must admit I definitely have a bias for Jesuits. :heart:

My husband and brothers went to a Jesuit High School, and my mother’s spiritual counselor whom I’ve had a few sessions with was a Jesuit priest. I really like their approach to things.


#10

Me, too! We drive about 30-40 minutes depending on traffic to go to a Jesuit church. There are literally 2 churches near us and quite a few on our route, but we really like the Jesuits.:thumbsup:


#11

I am blessed to attend a Jesuit parish that has 5 priests assigned! I am always blown away by how thoughtul and relevent their homilies are. My 28 year old daughter was lucky enough to attend an awesome Jesuit university and law school!:slight_smile:


#12

We discussed this same topic at work today. (I work for the Church). Pope Francis has not changed the Church’s teaching, but he has changed our focus. On the role of women, we all agreed that the Church needs to reflect deeply on the gift of womanhood. For those who are gay, we often hear, “Hate the sin, love the sinner,” but we spend so much time focusing on the sin without regard to the unique human dignity of the person. We also seem to think that their sin is so much worse that our own personal sin. Jesus doesn’t say this. He says to take the log out of our own eye before we take the splinter out of our neighbors. So we are walking around with giant logs whacking people with them at every turn. No wonder they don’t believe it when we say we love the sinner. Pope Francis says love the sinner, welcome them into the family, and only when a deep relationship is formed will there be a mutual reflection of our sinfulness.


#13

Whoa, great post!! :clapping:


#14

Very well said.:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup:


#15

This is so great.


#16

Amen. Love what he is doing - we need to show the world the real love of Christ.


#17

So, I was watching The Daily Show. Quote that made my blood boil in regard to the Pope’s stattement during the interview “Same hateful message, but the tone has changed.”

What part of pre-marital sex is a sin and this applies to hetero and homosexuals equally do people not understand? Accept and love homosexuals. Separate the person from the sin they may have committed if they are truly seeking God. Don’t judge. But marriage within the faith is still between a man and a woman, so anyone who is unwilling or unable to have such a marriage…regardless of sexual preference…is required to be celibate. I don’t see how that is a hateful message.


#18

The media is very liberal and has 0 tolerance for views that are different from their own. Just let it roll off your back and move on.


closed #19

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